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Cleveland: League Park

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Wow, what genius penned that headline for that article?  I expected to read about a $2M federal earmark or something.

 

Good news though.  Could be a very cool facility.

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They'll probably do some kind of "Buy a Brick" donation campaign to raise money, or atleast they should.

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Alot of 150K will need to be spent on site plans and architectural plans.  Maybe they are planning on donations for the rest.  You would think the Indians/Dolans/Shapiro's would pony up some cash.

 

Plans were drawn up and approved by the Planning Commission about 3 or 4 years ago. They were done by City Architecture, including an attractive 3D computer rendering. I believe these plans were used to secure this money.

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Don't know if it would have worked but it could have been cool if league park was restored +/- 100%  to be the home of CWRU/CSU/current Lake County Captains.  Maybe the AAA team could play a 1/2 dozen "home" series a season in Cleveland (15-20 games?).  How would MLB feel about a team using a smaller stadium on Mondays and Tuesdays?  Indians vs Royals on a Monday night isn't a huge draw these days... This is rather far fetched but just throwing an idea out there... 

 

 

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How would MLB feel about a team using a smaller stadium on Mondays and Tuesdays?  Indians vs Royals on a Monday night isn't a huge draw these days... This is rather far fetched but just throwing an idea out there... 

 

KStay's no doubt right that it would never happen today, but this is exactly what happened for most of the 30s If I remember correctly- the Indians played in both Cleveland Municipal and League Park.

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I can see CSU/CWRU using it, especially CSU.. but MLB.. no way.  AAA, nope, not in the same city. 

 

I could also see East Technical or East High playing there as well.  It could be a home to a little league team (sponsored by MLB as they are trying to bring baseball to the inner city - but thats another subject). OHSAA games.  Many, many uses.

 

 

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The Indians played at League Park for some home games until 1946.

 

The site is not large enough for a modern MLB stadium - as it was, the distance from home plate to the right field fence was only 290 feet - and there were no seats behind that wall - balls hit over that fence landed on Lexington Avenue.

 

Cle2032 - the Lake County team is the single-A affiliate but I don't know who runs Classic Park and I doubt they would want to share dates.  The Lake County club is very much identifiable as a "Lake County" team, just from what I gather in my visits out that way - so I doubt they're interested in having games in the ghetto.

 

As far as I can tell there are very few minor league teams, at least at the AA and AAA level, that play in cities that already have major league teams.  But CSU and/or a host of high school teams could probably use a good facility.

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Case recently built a new field with a pretty hefty donation from an alum, so I don't see that happening - high schools, certainly though. 

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Chasnnel 3 just did  a small blurb on the League Park Renovation effforts. There was some official announcement today. Hopefully there will be something in tomorrow's PD. 

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I think some of my friends were at this event.  They signed up for a historical baseball league that wants to use League Park regularly.  Old uniforms, old rules, etc.  They've talked to the League Park people and the idea was well recieved. 

 

Apparently, in old days, you could catch the ball on first bounce and still get an out.

 

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http://www.examiner.com/x-6513-Cleveland-Sports-Examiner~y2009m6d22-League-Park-A-connection-to-Clevelands-past-and-future

 

League Park: A connection to Cleveland's past and future

June 22, 8:35 PM

By: Cory Felegy

 

 

league_park_old1.jpg

Ariel view of the original League Park.  (Photo from ballparks.com)

 

Take a drive down Lexington Avenue on the east side of Cleveland and you’re likely to see a blend of urban decay peppered with pockets of renewal. Boarded houses and demolished lots are mixed with new construction and fresh coats of paint.

 

Drive far enough, to East 66th and you’ll reach a vintage-looking brick building connected to an aimless brick wall running the length of the block. For Cleveland baseball fans, you have reached hallowed ground: the remains of League Park, the original home of the Cleveland Indians.

 

Before the days of the enormous Municipal Stadium, Cleveland had its own neighborhood ballpark, very much in the style of Fenway Park in Boston. Originally built in 1891 and renovated in 1910, League Park was the site of several historic landmarks in baseball history. It’s where Babe Ruth hit homerun number 500. Joe DiMaggio hit in his 56th consecutive game at the park. And it was the site of the 1920 World Series that included the only unassisted triple-play in Series history.

 

After the 1946 season the Indians moved to Municipal Stadium full-time and League Park was dismantled in several stages by the city after it took over the property in 1951. All that remains is the ticket building, the wall running along E66th, and a large empty field. Without some kind of intervention soon, those remnants will crumble with the rest of the park.

 

Since the 1970’s there have five different plans to restore League Park and all have failed for one reason or another. But a new group has emerged to take up the cause - The League Park Society. Founded in 2008 after the latest renovation plan fell through, this group’s sole purpose is the restoration of a storied Cleveland landmark.

 

The society’s Director Russ Haslage is a passionate baseball fan who is leading the way to rebuild. Upon our meeting out at the location, he was eager to show me around. “Can you believe this is the spot where Ruth stood when he hit number 500?” We were at the approximate location of home plate, looking out to right field where a 60 foot wall once stood. (The short porch in right, only 290 feet from home, demanded a high wall to keep baseballs from landing on passersby on Lexington Avenue. The Green Monster in Fenway is only 37 feet high by comparison.)

 

Haslage envisions a complete restoration of the park in the vintage style of brick and green trim (see concept drawings in the slideshow and below). The surviving ticket building and wall of course would remain. But a new ballpark would be created including grandstands, a museum and gift shop, and of course a ball field. The infield would be artificial turf that could be peeled up to allow different levels of play, from little league all the way to pro dimensions.

 

Proposed events include baseball camps, little league games, vintage-style games, neighborhood and city events, and even a potential homerun derby by current Indians players. The Cleveland Indians currently support the venture but are reluctant to become directly involved. This is because the city has yet to throw its support behind the project by leasing the lot to the League Park Society; a step that is crucial to the success of the development.

 

“We’re not asking the city for a dime,” says Haslage. “But we need the city’s support to begin the project.” Without a lease, the League Park Society can’t apply for the federal grant money it needs to finance the plan. Right now the society is relying on donations alone, and hopes to receive corporate sponsorship once the renovation begins. Total cost is approximately $10 million but only a fraction of that amount is needed to get the project off the ground.

 

“Once we have the city on board, we can put in a playing field right away. That’s the easy part. Then construction can start while games are being played here.”

 

The city could be dragging its feet due to the overwhelming amount of other problems the mayor and city council are currently dealing with. Crime, foreclosures, and job loss are all immediate concerns. But a restored League Park has the potential to become a cornerstone in the revival of an entire neighborhood. There is already new residential development right across the street from the site.

 

Say’s Haslage, “It’s the neighborhood’s park. It belongs to them.” He emphasized the fact that this would be a public park, open to all when not in use for previously booked events. The support by the neighborhood is evident as residents passing by expressed interest in Haslage’s concept drawings.

 

A major step in the process of happens this week as the League Park Society has a scheduled presentation with the Cleveland Planning Commission at a community meeting. This is an opportunity for the group to state their case to key area leaders and hopefully move the plan from the backburner on the city’s list of concerns.

 

To bring League Park back from the brink of total destruction will require a monumental effort from the League Park Society and a commitment from the city. But the wheels are in motion. What a loss it would be for the game of baseball if the development of a condo or a convenient store rises where legends of the game once walked. This is Cleveland sports history in our midst and it deserves a revival.

 

For more info: To join the League Park Society or donate to the renovation please visit their homepage at www.leaguepark.org

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Pretty exciting...I watched a documentary on the Brooklyn Dodgers last night...reminded me some of what happened with League Park/Cleveland.  That could be a good anchor for that neighborhood.

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It still needs a team, or teams.  Maybe a little league tournament?  I think that'd be really cool.  I know I played there in middle school, but a tournament to correspond with the opening/renovations would energize.

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The Cleveland Blues vintage baseball team plans to make League Park their home by the end of this season.  Last Saturday they played a split doubleheader at Lakewood Park and the new stadium in Avon.  The Blues are actually Cleveland's second team in that league... maybe League Park could house them and the Forest Citys.  A little league tournament at League Park would be great too.  It would also be helpful if CSU would drop the idea of building a competing facility only a mile or two away. 

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I love this project.  Huge Fan.  To bad there isn't any Minor League team that could call Cleveland home.  All the Indians Minor League teams have new digs, so that is out of the question.  Regardless I love this project.  Great for Cleveland, and baseball fans.

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http://www.examiner.com/x-6513-Cleveland-Sports-Examiner~y2009m6d29-City-of-Cleveland-committed-to-League-Park-restoration

 

City of Cleveland committed to League Park restoration

June 29, 9:04 PM

By Cory Felegy

 

distance_lp.jpg

The League Park ticket building, on the corner of Lexington and East 66th.

 

(This article is a follow-up to a previous article published last week.)

 

Things are stirring at the corner of Lexington and East 66th.

 

In a recent community meeting, the city of Cleveland has shown clear intentions to restore historic League Park. The former home of the Cleveland Indians and the Cleveland Buckeyes (the city’s Negro League team of the era) was once the centerpiece of the Hough neighborhood during the first half of the 20th century.

 

The restoration was supported by former Councilwoman Fannie Lewis, and the push to continue her efforts after her passing are being carried on by current Ward 7 Councilman TJ Dow and Mayor Frank Jackson. A plan proposed before her death is being revisited, this time with action to back it up.

 

Currently, the city is working to obtain the last two private parcels in the northeast corner on the block that would give the city full control over the lot. Those parcels are currently in foreclosure and should be in the city’s hands soon.

 

And according to Eric Wobser, the Assistant Chief of Staff for the Mayor’s Office, the city has $2.5 million in dedicated funds for the project, obtained through the sale of Parks and Recreation Bonds. They hope to obtain up to $2 million more in the same fashion this year.

 

At the community meeting that took place last week (just across the street from the site at the Lexington Faith Baptist Temple), two proposals were presented to residents and city officials. One proposal came from City Architecture, the other from the League Park Society and Osborn Engineering (designers of the original League Park). While these two proposals are not competing plans, they do have differences in style that will need to be ironed out before ground is broken.

 

There is also concern from residents who feel like neither plan accommodates their needs. Some of their requests include a playground, facilities for football practice (which is one of the uses on the site currently), and even a water park. Said Dow: “This is the first conversation with the neighborhood. There are still many details to be worked out.”

 

And it’s important to consider that the ball field wouldn’t encompass the entire site, there would be room on the eastern side of the park to satisfy some of the residents’ requests. Either way, the site will remain a city park, under jurisdiction of the city of Cleveland.

 

The next step is to hash out a plan that works for all parties involved. That could be difficult as the city, the residents, and the League Park Society all have specific interests. When a plan is agreed upon, groundbreaking would occur in 2010 with the installation of a ball diamond that could be placed into use immediately.

 

This recent activity is reason for optimism. But several plans have come and gone in the past, so proponents of the restoration should remain cautious until dirt is moved. Steps are being taken to begin the process, but there is still a long road ahead before some form of League Park rises again.

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Amazing... Sort of "Wrigley Field-ish" They have a website for League Park and its latest news. League Park Dot Org, I think. There is a poster in The Only Cleveland Store in Tower City that depicts League Park in full color in its heyday. It is a great poster. It seems that with all the money in MLB, that the league would have some sort of grant available to help preserve the game's history. Especially its earliest parks. A great place to have tournaments and historic themed games or events.  :clap:

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I would take League Park just like that over Jacobs Field any day.

 

That picture with all the homes and buildings around it reminds me of White Hart Lane (Tottenham Hotspur), Highbury (Arsenal) or Craven Cottage (Fulham) in greater London.

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The city seems determined to rebuild Hough in a very different manner than what's shown in that picture.

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The city seems determined to rebuild Hough in a very different manner than what's shown in that picture.

 

I dont expect anything like whats seen in the picture, i know whats reasonable and not. But Fenway and Wrigley have survived the times, it would have been nice if League Park could have as well.

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Could you imagine taking the streetcar from your perfectly safe urban neighborhood and getting off at League Park for the 1920 World Series?  Damn...If i coul djust have one week in Cleveland in this era...

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Could you imagine taking the streetcar from your perfectly safe urban neighborhood and getting off at League Park for the 1920 World Series? Damn...If i coul djust have one week in Cleveland in this era...

 

Ill let you know when my time machine is finished

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The city seems determined to rebuild Hough in a very different manner than what's shown in that picture.

 

What you've seen done over the past couple decades was the brain child of essentially one woman, Fannie Lewis.  Whatever master plan guided development in Hough existed only in her head.  Without her, it is hard to know what the future of Hough will actually be.

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The city seems determined to rebuild Hough in a very different manner than what's shown in that picture.

 

What you've seen done over the past couple decades was the brain child of essentially one woman, Fannie Lewis. Whatever master plan guided development in Hough existed only in her head. Without her, it is hard to know what the future of Hough will actually be.

 

I did not know that.  Maybe one person can make a difference, even if it's an ugly suburban diference.  I can't help believing that the future of Hough is ours to decide.  A change in direction seems paramount.  Renovating League Park is a big part of that. 

 

I don't think density and transit, as per the photo, are unreasonable expectations.  But until the zoning code is changed to ban Solon and require urbanity, more Solon is the only reasonable expectation... because it's mandatory.  IIRC, the setbacks of the "townhouse" debacle between Euclid and Chester were somehow required by code.  This sort of travesty need not be repeated.  If I had a time machine, I'd go back about 10-15 years and get a variance for that development.  One piece of paper, timely filed, could have improved today's Hough dramatically.

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It is interesting you mention about the setbacks. Someone I spoke with from Glenville Redevelopment was telling me about how developers come in a lot and describe projects with these huge suburban-like setbacks. This person from the organization always tries to educate them as to why these large setbacks are archaic ideas in developing the new urban grid.

 

They act surprised and assume everyone wants big parking lots, driveways, etc..  They have preconceived notions of what people would want based on living in the automobile dominated urban landscape for the last 55-60 years or so. (that number is up for debate as to when things started shifting so auto. My number is just sets things back to the start of the end of a lot of mass transit to about 1950-55) The suburban style trends helped to create the mind-set that has so many assuming these days that we need huge setbacks and big parking lots. I think otherwise.

 

I feel, for example, when offered a rendering of what a "1920's Hough" looked like in a new-ish way, versus the "Solon-esque" stuff... I am sure many more than we think would chose the former.  I have a friend with a Grandmother who is well, alive and kicking..and very alert. She is 98-ish and tells stories of Cleveland neighborhoods that are truly amazing! 

 

She was lucky to have seen this era and remember it well. Her stories left me with the feeling that so many of us have totally lost the concept of what a real neighborhood/community was really like--and the logic that has so many developers under the assumption that we all want parking lots and big setbacks, pretty much tells how much we have forgotten.

 

Anyway, If any of you get a chance, go check out that poster. Maybe Hough can even be made better than it was.

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There are a whole lot of reasons Hough looks the way it does, from our awful zoning codes, to the misguided ideas that if we build the city like suburbia everything will be fixed... However... This is a thread about the redevelopment about League Park, not a thread on the greater thoughts of what happened to Hough and why it is what it is, and how to change everything about the city... so let's get it back to League Park  :)

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The Cleveland Blues vintage baseball team plans to make League Park their home by the end of this season. Last Saturday they played a split doubleheader at Lakewood Park and the new stadium in Avon. The Blues are actually Cleveland's second team in that league... maybe League Park could house them and the Forest Citys. A little league tournament at League Park would be great too. It would also be helpful if CSU would drop the idea of building a competing facility only a mile or two away.

 

Are they really moving along on this fast enough for this to happen?

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The Cleveland Blues vintage baseball team plans to make League Park their home by the end of this season. Last Saturday they played a split doubleheader at Lakewood Park and the new stadium in Avon. The Blues are actually Cleveland's second team in that league... maybe League Park could house them and the Forest Citys. A little league tournament at League Park would be great too. It would also be helpful if CSU would drop the idea of building a competing facility only a mile or two away.

 

Are they really moving along on this fast enough for this to happen?

 

Hard to say.  Everyone's optimistic.

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Hi Everyone,

 

It is so good to see such positive discussion regarding League Park.  The League Park Society is a non-profit 501©3 organization that has done a great deal of research, networking and team building in an effort to raise awareness and fascilitate the salvation, restoration and rebuilding of the historic park.  League Park is one of a kind and we believe that if it is saved and rebuilt in an historic and thoughtful manner, it could create many great things for the area.

 

Besides for local and national events...the home games of the Cleveland Blues and new Cleveland Buckeyes and a "little league" team we will sponsor and so much more...League Park can draw national events from all over the country.  In addition, we have networked with area pro sports teams about free sports camps and clinics for area youth and so much more.

 

League Park can be a functional museum with a hall of fame, meeting and party rooms and much more, able to accomodate baseball (all leagues and ages), softball, football, soccer and more.  In our 16 months of work we have heard from a movie producer, people in charge of world youth baseball tournaments and more.  League Park can also be the home of local civic and church events, company picnics and meetings, birthday parties and so much more.

 

I hope you might all consider being a part of the League Park Society.  There's nothing to join...just help.  Visit our website at http://www.leaguepark.org .  Send us a note and we'll add you to the database.  We ask only that you do what you can and want to do to help.  From writing to Cleveland city officials to spreading the word, any help is a great gift to saving the Grand Lady of Baseball.

 

I hope you will join our work to save League Park and celebrate that history and make the future something spectacular.  I am sure that if we build it, great things will come.

 

Russ Haslage, Director

The League Park Society

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Welcome, Russ, and thank you for your contribution. Please don't hesitate to keep us up to date and informed as your project proceeds. You have a very interested audience here.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Hi Everyone,

 

It is so good to see such positive discussion regarding League Park.  The League Park Society is a non-profit 501©3 organization that has done a great deal of research, networking and team building in an effort to raise awareness and fascilitate the salvation, restoration and rebuilding of the historic park.  League Park is one of a kind and we believe that if it is saved and rebuilt in an historic and thoughtful manner, it could create many great things for the area.

 

Besides for local and national events...the home games of the Cleveland Blues and new Cleveland Buckeyes and a "little league" team we will sponsor and so much more...League Park can draw national events from all over the country.  In addition, we have networked with area pro sports teams about free sports camps and clinics for area youth and so much more.

 

League Park can be a functional museum with a hall of fame, meeting and party rooms and much more, able to accomodate baseball (all leagues and ages), softball, football, soccer and more.  In our 16 months of work we have heard from a movie producer, people in charge of world youth baseball tournaments and more.  League Park can also be the home of local civic and church events, company picnics and meetings, birthday parties and so much more.

 

I hope you might all consider being a part of the League Park Society.  There's nothing to join...just help.  Visit our website at http://www.leaguepark.org .  Send us a note and we'll add you to the database.  We ask only that you do what you can and want to do to help.  From writing to Cleveland city officials to spreading the word, any help is a great gift to saving the Grand Lady of Baseball.

 

I hope you will join our work to save League Park and celebrate that history and make the future something spectacular.  I am sure that if we build it, great things will come.

 

Russ Haslage, Director

The League Park Society

 

Just wondering if anyone else on this thread wrote or called the city in support of this project, as outlined by Russ....

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^ I did not, but I donated some $$ to the League Park Society via their website and signed the online petition.

 

So did I, I'm just wondering why they are located in Amherst?  :?

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^ I did not, but I donated some $$ to the League Park Society via their website and signed the online petition.

 

So did I, I'm just wondering why they are located in Amherst?  :?

 

Maybe the person who is taking the time and effort to spearhead the project lives there?

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A lot of people who are helping make things happen in Cleveland do not reside right in the city proper. That's good that interest is being gained from the outside. An effort to restore Woodland Cemetery is spearheaded by someone in Mentor, all part of the greater metro region, anyway. Thanks for the donation!

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^ I did not, but I donated some $$ to the League Park Society via their website and signed the online petition.

 

So did I, I'm just wondering why they are located in Amherst?  :?

 

Maybe the person who is taking the time and effort to spearhead the project lives there?

A lot of people who are helping make things happen in Cleveland do not reside right in the city proper. That's good that interest is being gained from the outside. An effort to restore Woodland Cemetery is spearheaded by someone in Mentor, all part of the greater metro region, anyway. Thanks for the donation!

 

I get that.  However, if I was leading a group, I would make sure to have an office in the zip code/neighborhood entity I'm spearheading.  That's all.  Just seemed odd to me.  No need to discuss any further.

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Maybe for a small nonprofit a separate office is unnecessary overhead and a burden.

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L05.jpg

 

Wow, just stumbled upon this thread. Seriously, this park > all other ballparks in America. I love what I'm seeing here and the urban integration looks top notch. This park's exterior actually looks quite impressive, better than Wrigley, better than Fenway, and yes, better than my beloved and demolished Tiger Stadium. Most of the historic parks actually had limited detail. This one bucked that trend. I wish this was still the site of the Cleveland Indians. Sigh.

 

Also, I can't help but notice the similarities to Toledo's Swayne Field. The neighborhoods looked very similar.

 

 

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L05.jpg

 

Wow, just stumbled upon this thread. Seriously, this park > America. I love what I'm seeing here and the urban integration looks top notch. This park's exterior actually looks quite impressive, better than Wrigley, better than Fenway, and yes, better than my beloved and demolished Tiger Stadium. Most of the historic parks actually had limited detail. This one sure as hell bucked that trend. I wish this was still the site of the Cleveland Indians. Sigh.

 

Also, I can't help but notice the similarities to Toledo's Swaynce Field. The neighborhoods looked very similar.

 

 

 

Did you see the color post card photo? It is even better. It will make you want to crawl right into the photo!

 

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Hi All,

 

Thanks for the good words.  We appreciate the support of our work to save League Park.  Thank you for the donations.  Every cent of every donation goes toward operating expenses.  None of us is paid a cent.

 

To answer a question, our mailing address is in Amherst because I live there and since I do my League Park work in my home office, the post office box there just makes it easy to pick up the mail.  In the next couple of weeks you'll see our new address in downtown Cleveland.

 

The League Park Society is a diverse group.  Thanks to the wonders of the Internet, the members of the Society can live all over and we still get things done.  Some of the key members of the LPS live in Cleveland, Parma, Medina and other areas.  We all donate our time and talent, mostly from home.

 

I hope you can join us at League Park on Sunday, September 12 for some vintage base ball and fun.  We hope to have more information on the new Cleveland Buckeyes and on our new campaign to get Shoeless Joe Jackson into the MLB Hall of Fame.  Come out and join us if you can.  The games start at 1.

 

Russ

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Ohhh...a few more quick notes. 

 

We've added a few new things to the League Park website.  Have a look at the letters of support from the Indians, Red Sox and others.  Also, we are starting to list partners who are working with us.  The famous Bertman's Base Ball Mustard, Cleveland Blues and Osborn Engineering are listed and we're always open to partnering with other organizations and corporations.

 

Russ

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It’s a beautiful day for baseball here at League Park!

 

We’ve got a great event coming up this Saturday at the park.  I hope many of you can make it.  But before the big event, I wanted to bring you up to speed on what’s been happening.

 

Representatives of Osborn Engineering and I met with the Ward 7 League Park Committee last week and it went very well.  The Committee is charged with the task of gathering information and making recommendations to Councilman Dow on the future of League Park.  Though they have not yet chosen the design for the park, we all agree that construction MUST begin no later than Spring 2010.  Over the past year, the remaining structures at the park have deteriorated quite a bit and we all agree that restoration can no longer wait.  That is terrific news.

 

I am also very happy to report that The League Park Society has entered into a partnership with Bertman’s Original Ball Park Mustard.  If you’ve been to an Indians game in the last 75 years, chances are good that you know Bertman’s.  Their mustard was introduced to the world at League Park, and this Saturday it will be back at the park that started it all.  Bertman’s has been called the best mustard in the big leagues by a number of sports writers.

 

Also, the Baseball Heritage Museum has offered to host a League Park display at the museum and also to allow us to start holding meetings at the museum.  We will begin holding bi-monthly meetings at the museum in downtown Cleveland starting in November.  That will allow us to delegate some duties and prepare for Opening Day 2010.  Watch for news about meeting dates coming soon.  If you’d like to perform some duties for LPS, try to attend our November meeting.  Opening Day 2010 will be Saturday, April 24 and will celebrate the 100th birthday of League Park II.  (Opening Day 1910 was on April 21, but that is a Wednesday next year, so we’ll go with Saturday to allow more people to attend.)

 

The League Park Society has begun to look into acquiring what is left of 7209 Lexington Avenue in Cleveland.  That was the address of Shoeless Joe Jackson when he played in Cleveland.  He lived just two blocks past the outfield fence and walked to the park for each home game.  A new house has been built at 7211 Lexington and it appears that they may have purchased all or some of the 7209 lot.  If any part of the lot remains, we will explore purchasing that space.  If the owners of 7211 own it, we will ask permission to make it an historic spot to celebrate Cleveland’s rich baseball history.  We hope to put in some of Mrs. Jackson’s favorite plants that grew there during their time in Cleveland, a bench and a plaque and care for the area.

 

Speaking of Shoeless Joe, we have started working on a campaign to get the ban holding him back from the Baseball Hall of Fame lifted.  Joe was found not guilty in a court of law, yet the rule banning him from the Hall of Fame continues in force.  We have begun working on the campaign with the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum, the Cleveland Blues and others.

 

Part of the rich history of Cleveland Baseball and League Park includes the Cleveland Buckeyes.  LPS has registered the rights to the name and hopes to field a new Cleveland Buckeyes team in 2010.  The team will honor the noble history of the Negro Leagues team and will help celebrate and educate kids about its history.  We are now seeking sponsors to help us purchase new uniforms for the team.  We will be announcing the new team to the media at Saturday’s event.

 

Speaking of Saturday, I hope you can join us for a day filled with base ball.  Yes, two-word base ball because it will be a day of vintage base ball featuring our home team Cleveland Blues.  The Blues have invited the Cleveland Forest Citys, Hoover (PA) Sweepers and the Pittsburgh Franklins to play four games starting at 1.  Two games will be ongoing simultaneously.  Before the games begin, you’ll get a chance to see the new vintage team from Cleveland’s Whiskey Island hold a practice starting at noon.  At 12:30 a press conference will take place to tell fans and the media of our new partnerships with Bertman’s and the Ward 7 Committee.  We’ll also be introducing the new Cleveland Buckeyes team, featuring Ted Toles (1947 Cleveland Buckeyes) officially passing the torch to the new team.  Vern Fuller, former Cleveland Indians second baseman will throw out the first pitch in the first Blues game.  Bottles of Bertman’s will be on sale to help raise funds for LPS to pay for the event.  And to go with the mustard, League Park Foods will bring their hot dog cart with hot dogs, chili dogs, beer brats, chips, peanuts and soda pop.  Remember to bring some lawn chairs or a blanket to sit on.  We don’t have bleachers yet.  Bring your baseball gloves as well.  It should be a great day of fun and celebration.  Come to the park for any or all of the event.  The fun starts at noon and the games start at 1 and will continue until about 4.  Of course, I am always honored to show fans some of the historic parts of League Park and show the Osborn concept for the future.  Come get some mustard and autographs and photos.  Spread the word to friends and your local media.  If the media wants more info, have them contact me for the press release.  Let’s make this event something special.

 

Things are looking great.  Come support the Grand Lady of Ballparks as we celebrate her past and her future.  If you have any questions or need anything at all, I am always available for you.  I hope to see you on Saturday!

 

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Terrific news about League Park!

 

It is great to hear about the association with Bertman's Mustard and the Baseball Heritage Museum. That is the kind of synergy needed to get things done.

 

Thanks for keeping us informed.

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