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Cincinnati: Festivals, Music Concerts, & Events

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My band Elk Creek is playing at the Southgate House Revival tomorrow (Valentine's Day). Opening bands are Sohio and Billy Alletzhauser of The Hiders. Cover is $5 but if you come up to me and say the secret word "ColDayMan" I'll buy you a drink.

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/685937324751047/

 

Show is cancelled due to the snow tonight... supposed to get 4-6 inches of snow in NKY.

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DRINK!?!!?!??!?


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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^^...wow...


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Well, considering it linked to these threads, which nearly brought me to tears, it probably wasn't terribly hard to guess who'd've paid to advertize them!

 

http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,8555

http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,8556

 

Anyway, back on topic - sorry to hear the Elk Creek show was cancelled, though since I couldn't make it anyway, maybe there's a better chance for whenever you get your rain check...er...snow check!

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Kind of an underwhelming line-up this year although I am happy to see Flaming Lips as a headliner.  Hopefully they come up with a good band for the final slot although I usually enjoy the lesser known acts more - there are some diamonds in the rough but it is just not a deep roster.

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I predict this will be the final year for Bunbury. This is a completely weak lineup, especially in an age where seemingly every city is hosting a music festival.  Outside of the Flaming Lips, there is not a single band that even remotely interests me. 

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I predict this will be the final year for Bunbury. This is a completely weak lineup, especially in an age where seemingly every city is hosting a music festival.  Outside of the Flaming Lips, there is not a single band that even remotely interests me. 

 

I've been underwhelmed with the headliners every year. They usually have one good one.

 

There are a lot of bands I would want to see, though. Maybe not enough to buy a ticket, but there are a bunch I am interested in (and some I've seen and really enjoyed).

 

Kishi Bashi, Robert Delong, Cults, Kopecky Family Band, The Lighthouse and the Whaler, Saintseneca, and Heartless Bastards are all good. I don't recognize a lot of bands, but I'll definitely look them up. Hopefully the final headliner is a little more enticing and I may volunteer again.

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I'm past the age of recognizing a significant number of bands in a festival line-up, haha.

 

I love the Flaming Lips, though. Veruca Salt is still around?

 

Midpoint is clearly the better local festival. Bonnaroo and Pitchfork are close enough that, if I were interested in going to a summer festival, I probably wouldn't consider Bunbury. They've had GBV and the Flaming Lips, though, so it's not all terrible (but Pitchfork has like 10 bands of that caliber every year). It's not really an indie festival, it's not a pop festival...they either need to hammer down an identity or go broader. I think they could benefit from adding some EDM and alternative hip-hop.

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Yeah more electronic rock sounds. The introspective strummy rock sound that kicked in in the '90s and went for so long has lost young people. Emo (their older brother's music), Nu-Metal and Nu-Country (NASCARland genres) left a bad taste in their mouths about laying out personal experiences too specifically in song and it affected all rock.

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Music isn't over, but the album is. I try not to be crotchety about it, but it does bother me. I don't like mixes and singles, with the exception of a well-choreographed mixtape.

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I'm not giving up the clickwheel that easy; it's too dangerous to skip tracks if you have to stare at a screen to do it while running. And the phone is too big and expensive to be useful while doing jock-y stuff.

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My clickwheel iPod died a year ago, when a bottle of beer leaked in my bag. I replaced it with a $25 Sansa Clip thingamabob, which takes microSD cards (4GB internal). Only complaint is that it takes a long time to reload a large SD card if you fully power it down (gotta keep it in sleep mode), but it's tiny, practically weightless, holds a lot of music, expandable storage, works great.

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Ha...I am older than most on here and I recognize  more than a few bands, but I listen to a lot of music.  You touched on something interesting in that this festival needs to decide what it wants to be.  Midpoint is a great festival that brings truly indie bands to the city each year. 

 

This has been a mix of indie, alt, and bands that have moved to pop (although they likely started as alt.  While I would prefer a show with the Pixies, Pavement, Afghan Whigs, and even somebody like Death Cab every year that is not going to happen.  I also can appreciate a festival that has Flaming Lips and bands like Young the Giant and Wild Cub and even Hunter Hunted (who does a nice Pixies cover). 

 

I will say that each year I have had a great time as it is great to be out by the river in the summer with a bunch of friends.  The set up allows easy access to see which bands you want and socialize (and drink) if you want - I just like seeing live music though. 

 

I'm past the age of recognizing a significant number of bands in a festival line-up, haha.

 

I love the Flaming Lips, though. Veruca Salt is still around?

 

Midpoint is clearly the better local festival. Bonnaroo and Pitchfork are close enough that, if I were interested in going to a summer festival, I probably wouldn't consider Bunbury. They've had GBV and the Flaming Lips, though, so it's not all terrible (but Pitchfork has like 10 bands of that caliber every year). It's not really an indie festival, it's not a pop festival...they either need to hammer down an identity or go broader. I think they could benefit from adding some EDM and alternative hip-hop.

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Music isn't over, but the album is. I try not to be crotchety about it, but it does bother me. I don't like mixes and singles, with the exception of a well-choreographed mixtape.

Music isn't over, but the album is. I try not to be crotchety about it, but it does bother me. I don't like mixes and singles, with the exception of a well-choreographed mixtape.

 

 

When I was a kid, people walked around with ghetto blasters playing confrontational music.  I remember being at King's Island around 1989 and seeing some skinny kid with a sideways floppy hat playing Public Enemy on a boom box on his shoulder, walking around back by where the line starts for The Beast.  How did he sneak that thing in?  Didn't he know he was going to get it taken away?  It was a bold display, all around, and music was the medium. 

 

Is any kid today bringing a boom box to their pickup baseball or football games at the park?  No, and if they are, whatever they're playing is weak.

 

 

>I will say that each year I have had a great time as it is great to be out by the river in the summer with a bunch of friends.  The set up allows easy access to see which bands you want and socialize (and drink) if you want - I just like seeing live music though. 

 

I agree, it's a pretty good location for a festival, with plenty of places to get out of the sun.  The Atlanta Shaky Knees festival has moved to a city parking lot next to Atlantic Station.  It would be like going to a music festival at Broadway Commons, before the casino.   

 

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Music isn't over, but the album is. I try not to be crotchety about it, but it does bother me. I don't like mixes and singles, with the exception of a well-choreographed mixtape.

Music isn't over, but the album is. I try not to be crotchety about it, but it does bother me. I don't like mixes and singles, with the exception of a well-choreographed mixtape.

 

 

When I was a kid, people walked around with ghetto blasters playing confrontational music.  I remember being at King's Island around 1989 and seeing some skinny kid with a sideways floppy hat playing Public Enemy on a boom box on his shoulder, walking around back by where the line starts for The Beast.  How did he sneak that thing in?  Didn't he know he was going to get it taken away?  It was a bold display, all around, and music was the medium. 

 

Is any kid today bringing a boom box to their pickup baseball or football games at the park?  No, and if they are, whatever they're playing is weak.

 

 

The late '90s to mid-2000s made people leave music. Look at what was big:

 

nu-metal: fist-wailing dumb rock about crappy childhoods aimed directly at overweight trailer park teens

 

modern rock: aimed directly at overweight giant SUV-driving divorced women in their 40s. Nickelback.

 

boy bands: not even Pop since it sold poorly to anyone except girls under 16. Easily grown out of.

 

mainstream rap that went too far: mostly focused on spending money, the rap of the time got very boring and predictable. Again with the trailer park teens.

 

emo: depressing breakup music only. easily grown out of.

 

nu-country: aimed at the same overweight forty-something divorcees as modern rock; those women were the most important consumers of music throughout the decade rather the young, cool people the industry courted for the previous 50+ years. Young edgy people don't like to be ignored, but this genre did it.

 

None of this music was aimed at thinkers or trendsetters and made anyone remotely enigmatic barf. You need cool people buying and listening to music. I think music made it back OK, but it is a lot more electronic since the rock was so bad for so long. But the main problem with music is that it has no visuals on its own and therefore doesn't provide the constant visual stimulation young people demand today.

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Ehh, there was a lot of good stuff going on then. Modest Mouse, Flaming Lips (reinventing themselves awesomely), and the Elephant 6 bands, to name a few. Indie was hitting its stride, really, and the blogs and hipsters hadn't done their damage to it yet.

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I think the whole boom box thing was more about a techno fad than anything to do with music. At some point people realized that lugging those things around & keeping batteries charged was just a PITA.

That & you were pretty much just broadcasting, "rip me off rip me off".

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Bunbury Music Fest adds 4 bands, including headliner

 

The alt-rock Bunbury Music Festival, set for July 11-13 at Sawyer Point and Yeatman's Cove, has announced its remaining headliner, Empire of the Sun, and three additional acts: Cage the Elephant, Dead Sara and The Black Cadillacs.

 

Bunbury also revealed the schedule for the weekend.

 

Cont


"It's just fate, as usual, keeping its bargain and screwing us in the fine print..." - John Crichton

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Bill Donabedian was a guest on the most recent "OTR Podcast" and provided a lot of great insight on the festival. He talks quite a bit about how they choose bands. Essentially, Bunbury picks bands that are not playing any other dates in the Midwest, and bands that are up-and-coming (i.e., cheap) but they expect to become bigger in the near future. They also get some artists as part of package deals -- for example, Fall Out Boy, Paramore, and New Politics were already on tour together, so it was inexpensive to add Bunbury as another stop on their tour.

 

He also talks smack about Forecastle, saying that they are making a mistake by booking more expensive bands, making the tickets more expensive and making it much harder for the festival to make a profit.

 

Finally, he talks about how the Buckle Up festival is helping to spread out the infrastructure costs so they can spend more on artists and promotion. (Many of their rentals are monthly, so there was not much additional cost to keeping everything in place and holding a second festival the following weekend.) He also hints that he has several other festival ideas which will be added in future years.

 

http://otrpod.libsyn.com/bill-donabedian-of-bunbury-and-buckle-up-music-festival

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Many of these festivals force bands to sign contracts agreeing not to play anywhere else in the region for the time preceding the festival and for a year or more after, and within a prescribed radius.  Lollapalooza in Chicago has a "zone" that extends as far as Detroit. 

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While Lollapalooza has a pretty large radius clause (6 months before and 3 months after the festival within 300 miles of Grant Park) they apparently wave that for just about any acts if they ask (obviously they would say no to a headliner's show in Chicago or Milwaukee leading up to the festival). http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2012-04/new-lollapalooza-deal-blown-opportunity-98257

 

The article states that most other music festivals (Coachella, Bonnaroo, Pitchfork, etc) have radius clauses that last several weeks around the festival.

 

Is Lallapalooza's radius clause excessive? Yes. But I highly doubt festivals like Bunbury have large non-compete radii. They just don't want the headliners playing Indianapolis, Dayton, Columbus, and Louisville leading up to the festival. I think it's reasonable.

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^A lot of artists that play Coachella do smaller, quasi underground shows in LA the week before, between, or after the festival weekends.

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Many of these festivals force bands to sign contracts agreeing not to play anywhere else in the region for the time preceding the festival and for a year or more after, and within a prescribed radius.  Lollapalooza in Chicago has a "zone" that extends as far as Detroit. 

 

It doesn't sound like Bunbury has a strict radius, but he did mention one example of choosing not to book a band because they were playing somewhere on the east coast within a few weeks of the show. He also mentioned that many of the bands are only playing a handful of dates across in the US this entire year. The result is that people have come from all 50 states, and other countries, to attend Bunbury and see particular bands.

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Thanks for posting this!  I thought this was very insightful and helps give a good perspective on the festival.  Imgagine Dragons (which he specifically discusses) and Grouplove were the first two acts I thought of on the "buy early and cheap with the expectation they will get bigger by the time of the festival" philosophy.  I think Morning Parade and obviously Young the Giant are building some steam for this year.  I also liked the explanation around Empire of the Sun, which seemed like an eclectic choice.

 

Bill Donabedian was a guest on the most recent "OTR Podcast" and provided a lot of great insight on the festival. He talks quite a bit about how they choose bands. Essentially, Bunbury picks bands that are not playing any other dates in the Midwest, and bands that are up-and-coming (i.e., cheap) but they expect to become bigger in the near future. They also get some artists as part of package deals -- for example, Fall Out Boy, Paramore, and New Politics were already on tour together, so it was inexpensive to add Bunbury as another stop on their tour.

 

He also talks smack about Forecastle, saying that they are making a mistake by booking more expensive bands, making the tickets more expensive and making it much harder for the festival to make a profit.

 

Finally, he talks about how the Buckle Up festival is helping to spread out the infrastructure costs so they can spend more on artists and promotion. (Many of their rentals are monthly, so there was not much additional cost to keeping everything in place and holding a second festival the following weekend.) He also hints that he has several other festival ideas which will be added in future years.

 

http://otrpod.libsyn.com/bill-donabedian-of-bunbury-and-buckle-up-music-festival

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geez, I couldn't even find a thread for the Cincinnati Symphony :wtf:, but if anyone cares, they're appearing tonight at Carnegie Hall, along with the May Festival Chorus, and it will be broadcast live on WQXR in New York if anyone cares to tune in:

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/cincinnati-symphony-plays-john-adams-and-dett-oratorio/?utm_source=local&utm_media=treatment&utm_campaign=carousel&utm_content=item0

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MPMF (September 25-27) released the first round of artists last week.

 

Below is the list:

 

The Afghan Whigs • Panda Bear • Real Estate • The Raveonettes • Sun Kil Moon • Tycho • Deafheaven • St. Paul & the Broken Bones • Ex Hex • July Talk • EMA • The Cave Singers • Gardens & Villa • Rubblebucket • Speedy Ortiz • Barrence Whitfield & the Savages • Milagres • Ex-Cult • Landlady • Low Cut Connie • The Tontons • Cheerleader • Miniature Tigers

 

There is also the Indie Summer Series for free every Friday on Fountain Square starting May 30th.

 

Some of the highlights include WHY?, Local H, and MAN MAN.

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New wave of bands announced. http://mpmf.com/bands

 

Headliners: Afghan Whigs, OK Go, Chromeo

 

Full list of acts announced this time around:

 

OK Go • Wussy • Joseph Arthur • WHY? • Dessa • Liturgy • Lost In The Trees • Earth • Empires • Maserati • Coves • Body Language • Kid Congo Powers and Pink Monkey Birds • Froth • Blues Control • Gizmo • The Appleseed Collective • All Them Witches • Across Tundras • Ancient Warfare • Mr. Elevator and the Brain Hotel • Drowners • Corners • Bailiff • Dresses • Mustered Courage • Lab Partners • Love X Stereo • Buffalo Clover • Quiet Life • Caroline Glaser • The Ghost Wolves • Pujol • Shivering Timbers • Good Graeff • Public • Parallels • Heavy Hinges • The Ridges • Darlene • Holy Ghost Tent Revival • Young Heirlooms • Moonbow • Automagik • Wild Leaves • Steelism • Modoc • Pop Goes The Evil • Fort Wilson Riot • Smasherman • Jeecy and The Jungle • Prim • Alpha Consumer • Arum Rae • Apache Dropout • Electric Citizen

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fyi, they didn't have to change their name. They chose to because playing shows in England they realized they were getting confused with the other band. No one will confuse this Earth with the 1969 English band that didn't go anywhere.

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