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1 hour ago, MyTwoSense said:

 

This isn't what I meant, but that would happen.  The issue I see is less services for children and less programs.  East High has closed, now if Collinwood closes, cramming students into that one building causes and issue with travel and safety.  Children who live further away, will be less likely to attend classes and their parents less likely to attend events. and that is the very tip of the iceberg.  Teachers and administrators along with school programs are different discussions.


I do agree with the travel issue, especially becuase so many students walk or take RTA to class. But below is what the district said about enrollment sizes and services investment. I can see where it would be a drain to have to maintain these massive buildings, and instead focus more money to existing programs.

 

There are just 305 students in Collinwood High School, a building with capacity for 1,625 students, the district says. Glenville has 384 students in an 1,800-student building.

 

D40D12C5-0EC4-4A15-A46F-AEB2C34992FD.jpeg

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2 hours ago, MyTwoSense said:

I have read it but i notice you didn't answer my questions.  that are has seen resurgence, they needed a new high school.  Not all of those children will fit into LW nor should they all go there.

Yes I did. I said a school shouldn’t be built on a prime stretch of developable land. Oh well. I’m sure you have some numbers to back up an increase of high school age students in the area that would necessitate a new high school. Especially when a new high school was just built 2 miles away. 

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1 hour ago, Enginerd said:


I do agree with the travel issue, especially becuase so many students walk or take RTA to class. But below is what the district said about enrollment sizes and services investment. I can see where it would be a drain to have to maintain these massive buildings, and instead focus more money to existing programs.

 

There are just 305 students in Collinwood High School, a building with capacity for 1,625 students, the district says. Glenville has 384 students in an 1,800-student building.

 

D40D12C5-0EC4-4A15-A46F-AEB2C34992FD.jpeg

 

Again, why is the district saying enrollment is below 400 for these buildings when the OHSAA says there's many more students than that?

 

I feel like CMSD is trying to "get creative" with numbers here to justify not having to pay to maintain a big old building.

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10 minutes ago, jam40jeff said:

 

Again, why is the district saying enrollment is below 400 for these buildings when the OHSAA says there's many more students than that?

 

I feel like CMSD is trying to "get creative" with numbers here to justify not having to pay to maintain a big old building.

Cleveland has a significantly large transient student population. 400 is probably a correct number for students that attend a full year at this schools. 

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11 minutes ago, KFM44107 said:

Cleveland has a significantly large transient student population. 400 is probably a correct number for students that attend a full year at this schools. 

 

That may be so, but transient students still take up space.  If 400 students attend a full year, but at any given time there are many more transient students moving in and out, you need space for more than 400.  The OHSAA takes a snapshot enrollment figure at the end of October.  October 31, 2018 put both Glenville and Collinwood at nearly double what CMSD has them at.  There has to be something else going on.

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1 hour ago, jam40jeff said:

 

That may be so, but transient students still take up space.  If 400 students attend a full year, but at any given time there are many more transient students moving in and out, you need space for more than 400.  The OHSAA takes a snapshot enrollment figure at the end of October.  October 31, 2018 put both Glenville and Collinwood at nearly double what CMSD has them at.  There has to be something else going on.

 

Seniors aren't generally counted in stats for the following year, so it's a estimate, that is why they look at 9-11.  I think it's funny math at the state level on how the student body is calculated.

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21 hours ago, MyTwoSense said:

 

Seniors aren't generally counted in stats for the following year, so it's a estimate, that is why they look at 9-11.  I think it's funny math at the state level on how the student body is calculated.

 

I know that, but my point is that the numbers for 9-11 for each school are significantly higher than the numbers CMSD gives for 9-12.

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There are a lot of specialized HIgh Schools in CMSD now. Is it possible that the schools without teams are lumped into the schools with teams?

 

I assume the kids would be able to choose to be on one of the teams that exist? Just a guess. 

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11 hours ago, jam40jeff said:

 

I know that, but my point is that the numbers for 9-11 for each school are significantly higher than the numbers CMSD gives for 9-12.

I keep looking at this and the only thing I can come up with is CMSD is only reporting one sex, not both sexes.  This is a mystery.

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Collinwood, Glenville residents plead with Cleveland school district to save Collinwood High

Updated Oct 29, 2019; Posted Oct 28, 2019

By Patrick O'Donnell, The Plain Dealer

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Collinwood and Glenville residents pleaded with the Cleveland school district Monday night to halt plans to close Collinwood High School and merge it into neighboring Glenville High School.

 

Residents complained that shutting Collinwood and putting a fence around it would be a huge eyesore for the neighborhood.

 

They worried that forcing rival schools to become one will draw violence from students and from the different gangs in the neighborhoods. And they begged the district to not make students travel a few miles to school, instead of a few blocks now, on overcrowded buses or by walking on dangerous streets.

 

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2019/10/collinwood-glenville-residents-plead-with-cleveland-school-district-to-save-collinwood-high.html

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Seems like a lot of fights occur in Cleveland schools. Lots of blame to go around...poorly run schools, absentee parents, bad socioeconomic conditions, nervous system-destroying lead paint, etc. etc.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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^To the point @X was alluding to though, I don't believe the fights are the school district's fault. First, we've all been to high school and know that fights happen period. Maybe not huge brawls all the time, but some one on ones definitely. Second, CMSD is dealing with all those issues you mentioned @KJP on a mega scale and only how the schools are run can it control, which I argue is only a small part of it. You drop all those widespread issues on any school district and are almost guaranteed to watch it crumble. 

 

Until the socioeconomic issues within the city CMSD serves and the issue of absentee parenting is resolved, these issues will continue to plague the district.

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48 minutes ago, Mov2Ohio said:

^To the point @X was alluding to though, I don't believe the fights are the school district's fault. First, we've all been to high school and know that fights happen period. Maybe not huge brawls all the time, but some one on ones definitely. Second, CMSD is dealing with all those issues you mentioned @KJP on a mega scale and only how the schools are run can it control, which I argue is only a small part of it. You drop all those widespread issues on any school district and are almost guaranteed to watch it crumble. 

 

Until the socioeconomic issues within the city CMSD serves and the issue of absentee parenting is resolved, these issues will continue to plague the district.

 

It's why that I can never move to the city of Cleveland as long as my son is of school age. And I can't afford the other schooling alternatives.

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Now why do I think this nonsense doesn't happen in Asian or Western Europe? The race to the bottom continues, and we're all losing.

 

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2020/02/ohio-graduates-wont-have-to-be-proficient-in-math-or-english-under-state-superintendents-plan.html

 

Ohio graduates won’t have to be “proficient” in math or English, under state superintendent’s plan

 

 

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On 11/28/2019 at 10:54 AM, KJP said:

 

It's why that I can never move to the city of Cleveland as long as my son is of school age. And I can't afford the other schooling alternatives.

 

Reminder --

Quote

Unless Ohio’s legislators find a way this week to address the EdChoice voucher crisis, one has to assume that the pro-voucher ideologues in the Ohio Senate intend to take advantage of the coronavirus pandemic to allow—on April 1, 2020— the total number of Ohio’s EdChoice Designated public schools to grow to 1,200.

https://janresseger.wordpress.com/

 

 

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We are actually considering a school in Cleveland for my son, if he can test in to it. Whenever that test will be......


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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On 2/23/2020 at 9:25 PM, TBideon said:

Now why do I think this nonsense doesn't happen in Asian or Western Europe? The race to the bottom continues, and we're all losing.

 

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2020/02/ohio-graduates-wont-have-to-be-proficient-in-math-or-english-under-state-superintendents-plan.html

 

Ohio graduates won’t have to be “proficient” in math or English, under state superintendent’s plan

 

 

I can't help but think that if a high school student struggles with these most basic math concepts, shouldn't they be in some sort of vocational program that can give them skills to be employable in some fashion?  

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