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Columbus: Harrison West / Dennison Place Developments and News

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16 hours ago, wpcc88 said:

 

Price is two lanes max! It's not happening and for good damn reason. Also literally nobody said they want SN to look like Hilliard, I hate that area to be honest. Like I said unless you're invested, you have zero room to complain to the commission and need to stay right here on this forum, especially if you don't live there. I was hardly worried about the traffic but more about the 15 story building that was a half block off High Street that would look like the death star. They could've went back to the drawing board and came up with a compromise but again they decided to publicly pout because they didn't get their way, too damn bad.

 

I may be mistaken, but isn't Price a one way street with a light where it hits High? If every other development has managed to be built without causing a traffic apocalypse then I am pretty sure this would have been fine as well. I also vividly remember Kaufman adjusting this proposal 6-8 times before giving up, so maybe you mean map instead of drawing board.  You just seem like the truest NIMBY right now, you're here claiming you support density as long as it isn't where?... Oh, as long as it isn't in your back yard. 

 

Dude, all of these responses are right. You're gatekeeping development input and opinions but that's just not how it works. I go to a lot of these commission meetings but I don't own property in any of them. I live in German Village but I care about how the city grows and develops as a whole.

Edited by DevolsDance
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We could go around and around about the Kauffman/Price Avenue project, but this is the Harrison West/Dennison Place thread--SO BACK ON TOPIC, please. 

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On 5/18/2017 at 4:03 PM, ColDayMan said:

Four-Story Building to Bring More New Apartments to Harrison West

 

A four-story mixed-use building is under construction in Harrison West, bringing another 26 new apartment units to the neighborhood.

 

The project, at 840 Michigan Ave., sits just to the north of the 140-unit Trotters Park apartment complex, which was completed in 2015.

 

More below:

http://www.columbusunderground.com/four-story-building-to-bring-more-new-apartments-to-harrison-west-bw1

 

timthumb.php?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.columbusunderground.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F05%2FMichigan-Ave.jpg&q=90&w=650&zc=1&

 

CU has a photo of this project - http://www.columbusunderground.com/four-story-building-to-bring-more-new-apartments-to-harrison-west-bw1 - at the northwest corner of Michigan and Buttles (840 Michigan Avenue) just to the north of the 140-unit Trotters Park apartment development completed in 2015.  Photo from the CU construction update at https://www.columbusunderground.com/construction-roundup-short-north-university-district

cons-mar-2019-34.jpg

 

Unfortunately that's not good news.  This construction project has been stalled since Summer 2017 (check out the google streetviews from August 2017 and July 2018.  And UO posters have noticed the lack of progress over the past two years:

 

On 7/31/2017 at 5:35 PM, wpcc88 said:

This project has been shuttered all summer, anyone know what happened?  The stairwells and elevator shaft are both complete or near completion too,  just plain weird.

 

On 12/27/2018 at 9:28 AM, aderwent said:

 

This is still just sitting. Some framing done for the retail spot. Looks like the owner (SWAC IV LLC) is delinquent on their property tax, too...

 

On 12/27/2018 at 9:58 PM, cityscapes said:

This should restart shortly there are new permits under review to complete the project. 

 

Now its even got a reddit post:  https://www.reddit.com/r/Columbus/comments/b84nvi/abandoned_development_in_harrison_west/

 

Quote

Posted by funkymoses17 - 3 days ago - Abandoned Development in Harrison West

Does anyone have any information on the abandoned development on the corner of Thurber and Buttles in Harrison West. They started construction on it 2 years ago and then abandoned it after awhile. They occasionally will cut the grass (after waiting entirely too long each time) and have stashed construction equipment on the site before but it's a huge eye sore and is just surrounded by temporary fencing.

 

tlb919 gave this reply on reddit, but I wonder if anyone else has any updates?

 

Quote

tlb919 - 3 days ago

It's actually Mulberry who is developing it. It was originally supposed to be an "extended stay hotel" aka apartments using a zoning loophole. Either way, I believe I read they halted due to a change in how they wanted to build the site and while its tied up in approvals they are focusing their resources on building out the silver of land they have in Jeffrey Park first.

 

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The King and High project will be presented at the University Area Commission Zoning Committee this afternoon. Hopefully the St. Louis based developer is proposing something interesting. From the last meeting it seemed the developer was interested in utilizing some of the existing buildings. Also being reviewed is the 5th and Forsythe project (former 5th Ave school). 

 

I'm looking forward to seeing the concepts!

https://universityarea.org/2019/05/june-3-2019-zoning-committee-agena/ 

 

Edited by Pablo

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The photo is from a Facebook group - someone snapped it during the committee meeting. It's 13 stories tall - I'm surprised no media has reported on this project. The view is looking southwest, the Hippie Hut building is in the foreground. 

 

61904105_10158664366850031_8797715982974

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I don't hate it, well I don't hate the massing and height for the location. I think the design could use a bit of refinement but thats to be expected with early conceptual reviews. 

Being the area is mostly renter dominated, I really doubt we will see much fight on this one like we did at Price and High. 

 

I'm curious if anyone was there what the general response was like?

Edited by DevolsDance

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It looks good and I love how they preserved the older building on the corner but I feel like it would be better if they flipped the taller portion to be at the intersection and the shorter massing located at the south so you don't have a really tall buildings adjacent to the lower buildings on the same block. 

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^Looks like the row houses on King and the Ohio Exterminators building are still there.

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King and High Proposal to be Heard by Board

 

Screen-Shot-2019-07-19-at-11.15.50-AM-62

 

A proposal to build an 11-story building at the southwest corner of King Avenue and North High Street will be presented to the University Impact District Review Board (UIDRB) next week.

 

The mixed-use building would contain 289 apartment units, about 10,000 square feet of ground floor retail space and a parking garage with room for 278 cars. Three of the five buildings that currently occupy the site would be partially preserved, according to documents submitted to the city.

 

Of the 289 apartments, 150 of the units would be small studios, ranging in size from 351 to 418 square feet. 

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/king-and-high-proposal-to-be-heard-by-board-bw1

 

KingandHigh-1-1150x550.jpg


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Proposal for King and High has 11-story complex with 289 apartments

 

A new-to-town developer has big plans near Ohio State University.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/07/22/proposal-for-king-and-high-has-11-story-complex.html

 

King-and-High2.png


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As-is... A development that tall will never be approved in that location. I expect this to get watered down to absolute garbage by the time the commission and NIMBYs have a chance to chime in on the project on Thursday.

 

Personally I think this is a killer spot for some density and height to be added. The area is mostly rental properties and it's adjacent to a grocery, its sandwiched between two of the densest parts of the city, and it's a gateway intersection in a sense. I also am holding out hope that eventually Kroger will see the parking lot as more valuable as something... anything other than a surface lot. 

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Sorry - didn't see the article posted above. The renderings are strange, are they trying to mimic old sepia toned photos? I like the density, hopefully it won't get too diluted. The developer has made steps to save portions of the older buildings.

Edited by Pablo

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6 hours ago, DevolsDance said:

As-is... A development that tall will never be approved in that location. I expect this to get watered down to absolute garbage by the time the commission and NIMBYs have a chance to chime in on the project on Thursday.

 

I'm indifferent to this project overall but I have the exact opposite feeling about what will happen with the commission. I could easily be wrong though. 

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Is this under the University commission or Vic Village? I would worry more if it were VV, but.....I hope it doesn't get reduced.

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21 minutes ago, Zyrokai said:

Is this under the University commission or Vic Village? I would worry more if it were VV, but.....I hope it doesn't get reduced.

 

University Impact Review Board, they're not nearly as insane as VV is but they still have a tendency to push back on variance requests. 

I am curious to see how this one plays out being that the specific development falls in UARB discretion but also considered part of the SN overlay. 

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CU reported in May 2018 about an adaptive reuse proposal for the historic church at 1334 Neil Avenue in the Dennison Place neighborhood.   The church at the corner of West Sixth Avenue and Neil was built in 1880 as the Neil Avenue United Presbyterian Church, but has been vacant since 1998.  CU reported that J.C. Hanks, of Legacy Management Services (LMS), hoped to close on the property in the summer of 2018 and start the renovation soon after.  His plans called for a coffee shop in the main sanctuary area and four apartments in what used to be the church’s office and meeting spaces.  An adjacent building – once the church’s parsonage – currently holds two apartments, which would remain.

 

Apparently, the project is now complete.  Columbus Navigator reports that the apartments are finished.  Although its the new Stauf’s Coffee Roasters that moved into the church's sanctuary space that is getting all the attention.  And rightly so.  Below are multiple links about the Stauf's opening and a sampling of photos:

 

https://www.columbusnavigator.com/staufs-neil-avenue/

https://www.columbusunderground.com/first-look-staufs-on-neil-avenue-we1

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/09/06/from-church-to-chai-check-out-the-new-staufs.html

 

Here's what the church corner looked like prior to the renovation:

Neil-Ave-Church.jpg

 

Here's a look at the same corner just prior to Stauf's opening:

staufs-07.jpg

 

And here's the Stauf's patio filled with customers:

Staufs-Neil-Ave-10.jpg

 

Now for the interior:

Staufs-Neil-Ave-6.jpg

 

The former sanctuary space, transformed:

Staufs-Neil-Ave-1.jpg

 

Staufs-Neil-Ave-12.jpg

 

And those stained glass windows (!)

staufs-11.jpg

 

Order up!

Staufs-Neil-Ave-5.jpg

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This is why I hate to see old churches torn down, like the one in Franklinton and recently in OTE.  They have such unique architecture that adaptive reuse should always be the first solution instead of demolition (not that that's necessarily different from other types of buildings).  A lot of developers seem to shy away from them, probably because of potential maintenance or renovation costs, but they really do make very cool projects.

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Can't remember if this is technically Short North or Unviersity District....but the King & High Tower has been reduced by one floor, from 11 down to 10. Queue the outrage.

 

I can't read the article, so I don't know what other type of info it has.

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/09/27/developer-shortens-proposed-tower-at-king-and-high.html?iana=hpmvp_colum_news_headline#i/11387055

 

image.png.5af72535ba77166757af41a9336de86d.png

 

This rendering still depicts the 11-story version.

 

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17 minutes ago, cbussoccer said:

Can't remember if this is technically Short North or Unviersity District....but the King & High Tower has been reduced by one floor, from 11 down to 10. Queue the outrage.

 

I can't read the article, so I don't know what other type of info it has.

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/09/27/developer-shortens-proposed-tower-at-king-and-high.html?iana=hpmvp_colum_news_headline#i/11387055

 

image.png.5af72535ba77166757af41a9336de86d.png

 

This rendering still depicts the 11-story version.

 

 

Some really interesting discussions and points are brought up in the article.

 

- Project falls under the UIRB

- Overall the developers say the project is a few million off target, but that they've overcome larger hurdles than that with other projects.

- They are shifting the tower to the center to avoid it being "overwhelming" to the neighborhood.

- Historic structures will be restored and renovated, not demolished and rebuilt.

- Unit pricing will be "attainable" for Young Pros and Students, starting around $1,000/month for micro units.

- 279 units, 419 beds

- 233 space garage

- Developer sees strong market potential and is planning more projects in the city

 

Interesting nugget of info, the commission seems split on the project. One commissioner strongly dislikes the project, feels it isn't a fit for the neighborhood and will be one of the tallest structures on High Street at 118' tall. Local residents concerned about heavy traffic congestion at the intersection and immediate area from increased density. However, on the flip, one of the commission members said  "They have been trying to be as reasonable as they could. The truth is, within a few years, much of the rest of the city will be like this (with buildings of this height.)" and is pushing for quality materials vs focusing on the height and density.

 

 

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^ This project is located in the Dennison Place neighborhood, which is north of 5th Avenue (which is the official northern boundary of "The Short North").  CbusSoccer's post and DevoIsDance's reply have been moved into this thread.

 

Below is an excerpt of the Business First article:

 

Developer shortens proposed tower at King and High

 

St. Louis-based Collegiate Development returned to the University Impact District Review Board on Thursday with retooled plans for a mixed-use tower at the southwest corner of King and High streets, which would build on some of the historic retail buildings on that site today.

 

The latest iteration drops a floor from the 11-story version proposed in July and reduces the height a bit to 118 feet.  The developer also says it has shifted the mass of the building to the center of the site so its height doesn't loom over the neighborhood.

 

The new look cuts the apartment mix to 279 units and 419 beds.  Half of the units would be "micro" units with the rest a mix of one-, two-, and four-bedroom units.  The top floor would have an amenity deck with a sky lounge, according to the plans.  About 233 parking spaces would be built into an interior garage.  ...  Other changes include shifting the entry point for the garage off High Street so it doesn't choke traffic in the area.  The new building would be right across the street from the Short North Kroger.

 

The building would be the tallest High Street structure in its immediate vicinity, surpassing the 105-foot Jackson building a few blocks away.  The 138-foot White Castle development and 132-foot Moxy Hotel to the south are the next closest recent building projects to pass this height. ... The building must return to the University Impact District Review Board for formal approval.

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/09/27/developer-shortens-proposed-tower-at-king-and-high.html

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I've never had an issue with the density, but the massing was off IMO. Hopefully moving the tower to the middle helps. And I agree that the focus should be to make sure the design and materials are right. 

 

Still a shame they dont seem to be able to incorporate the service station. May take some out of the box thinking and may not necessarily maximize every last inch but I think it would be worth it in the end. 

Edited by DTCL11
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Also great to hear that they’re preserving and restoring the historic buildings. And honestly if this stays at 10 stories, I’ll be happy. I assume with most projects facing predictable height/density concerns that the developer knows they’re going to receive pushback, so they initially propose something higher than they want to build, then “compromise” to their original target.

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My Sunday run took me on the bike path along the Battelle project. Parking garage construction is underway. 

 

 

E2354D1B-7A30-4423-9360-8FCAE4A63B79.jpeg

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Unfortunate news regarding the King and High development. This seems to be a lose-lose situation for both preservationists and urbanist. The developer seems to want to cut losses and just get lazy. And while I'm not a pitchfork and torches type of person, I do see THIS as an unfortunate precedent if it succeeds. This isn't a stand alone, beyond repair, set of buildings. I'm ok with the occasional demolition but this is less than ideal, especially to replace it with a building that us going to be under 72 ft. 

 

Screenshot_20191101-151557_Chrome.jpg

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Just saw this on FB - this really sucks.

 

Maybe the developer should have donated to Ginther's reelection - probably would have greased the skids a bit.

Edited by Pablo
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22 minutes ago, DTCL11 said:

Unfortunate news regarding the King and High development. This seems to be a lose-lose situation for both preservationists and urbanist. The developer seems to want to cut losses and just get lazy. And while I'm not a pitchfork and torches type of person, I do see THIS as an unfortunate precedent if it succeeds. This isn't a stand alone, beyond repair, set of buildings. I'm ok with the occasional demolition but this is less than ideal, especially to replace it with a building that us going to be under 72 ft. 

 

Nobody wants to admit it, but this is going become a much more common occurrence if every development proposal continues to be met with the density and height battles at every single neighborhood commission meetings in high growth areas and corridors. 

 

The reality is that this project (and many others) hit a road block and at a certain point developers are pretty much losing money. Once a project hits a block like what happened here they have to either commit to financial losses and continue to push at meetings against (outdated) height and density restrictions, they proceed like this by saying screw it and just building what is allowed (usually cutting costs by removing pieces like historic preservation and good urbanism), or they walk away from the project all together. This could have been avoided by the UAIRB focusing on architectural quality/materials and less on how they feel about the short north pushing north or their traffic concerns. The commissions in this city are an amazing asset that so many boom cities lack, but if their power to decide on density, parking, and height isn't reigned in, situations like this are going to become much more common.

 

I'm officially dubbing this a spite project. 

Edited by DevolsDance
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1 minute ago, DevolsDance said:

 

Nobody wants to admit it, but this is going become a much more common occurrence if every development proposal continues to be met with the density and height battles at every single neighborhood commission meetings in high growth areas and corridors. 

 

The reality is that this project (and many others) hit a road block and at a certain point developers are pretty much losing money. Once a project hits a block like what happened here they have to either commit to financial losses and continue to push at meetings against heigh and density restrictions, they proceed like this by saying screw it and just building what is allowed (usually cutting costs by removing pieces like historic preservation and good urbanism), or they walk away from the project all together. This could have been avoided by the UAIRB focusing on architectural quality/materials and less on how they feel about the short north pushing north or their traffic concerns. The commissions in this city are an amazing asset that so many boom cities lack, but if their power to decide on density, parking, and height isn't reigned in, situations like this are going to become much more common.

 

I'm officially dubbing this a spite project. 

 

100% agree. 

 

This site had so much potential to follow the North Market AC Hotel model to be amazing and that's been lost. 

 

I think this may also be because it's an out of town developer. As we get more outside investment, are they going to be less likely to put up with commissions in the same way that many local developers have in the evolution of the Short North, VV, and IV? I Love that we are getting outside investment but the commissions are going to have to learn quickly that not every developer is going to be as forgiving as woods, kaufman, puzutti, etc..  Outside developers will be more likely to drive what they fear most: indiscriminate bulldozing. 

 

I will say I was a bit surprised that there seems to be no recourse in terms of appropriateness of demolition for these buildings. 

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36 minutes ago, Pablo said:

Just saw this on FB - this really sucks.

 

Maybe the developer should have donated to Ginther's reelection - probably would have greased the skids a bit.

 

 

Pretty sure the whole Ginther re-election campaign budget was $10,000

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2 hours ago, DTCL11 said:

Unfortunate news regarding the King and High development. This seems to be a lose-lose situation for both preservationists and urbanist. The developer seems to want to cut losses and just get lazy. And while I'm not a pitchfork and torches type of person, I do see THIS as an unfortunate precedent if it succeeds. This isn't a stand alone, beyond repair, set of buildings. I'm ok with the occasional demolition but this is less than ideal, especially to replace it with a building that us going to be under 72 ft. 

 

Screenshot_20191101-151557_Chrome.jpg

What a disaster of an outcome. 

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Those buildings have no character and no architectural significance at all.

Whether than prejudge the future development and jump on the negative bandwagon,  I say wait until the proposal is submitted. Some people were quick to condemn German Village residents over a Hotel proposal that did not fit the historic  character of the neighborhood, but now want to save a group of building simply because they are old.

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14 hours ago, Rowntowner said:

Those buildings have no character and no architectural significance at all.

Whether than prejudge the future development and jump on the negative bandwagon,  I say wait until the proposal is submitted. Some people were quick to condemn German Village residents over a Hotel proposal that did not fit the historic  character of the neighborhood, but now want to save a group of building simply because they are old.

I think there's a little bit of a difference between building in an empty parking lot next to a highway and tearing down buildings along our cities most prominent street. Not every old building is worth preserving, but I think these should have been saved and incorporated somehow. Otherwise if just tear everything down you end up with the ugly bland could be anywhere newness that is campus now. 

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On 11/1/2019 at 7:50 PM, Rowntowner said:

Those buildings have no character and no architectural significance at all.

Whether than prejudge the future development and jump on the negative bandwagon,  I say wait until the proposal is submitted. Some people were quick to condemn German Village residents over a Hotel proposal that did not fit the historic  character of the neighborhood, but now want to save a group of building simply because they are old.

 

I'd say maybe the GV residents deserved being condemned over their reaction to a quality development next to a freeway on a surface lot and a 1970s stucco office building. The GV project architects specifically jumped through hoops and designed sections of the hotel to blend into the historic architecture, thats quite different than what is happening here. The project being discussed here is a developer who wanted to go tall but preserve the history and is now saying "eff it" and razing old buildings with character to build out the plot to the max allowed because they are sick of dealing with the commission. Yep, totally the same.

 

Edited by DevolsDance
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quote from the Old North Columbus thread that was relevant to this Harrison West thread:

On 11/3/2019 at 3:54 PM, wpcc88 said:

Thank you for posting these, however this was pretty bad work on CU's part.  They posted a picture in Victorian Village of the apartment project between Thurber & Michigan Ave's during this "update" even though the project has been stalled for almost two years.

 

I noticed that in the comment section.  Even though it was an error, I guess we can still appreciate the update.  Even if the update is "there is no update"(!)  The last post here about this project was by me on April 4 at https://forum.urbanohio.com/topic/360-columbus-harrison-west-dennison-place-developments-and-news/?do=findComment&comment=885582.  At that time there was a reddit poster who speculated that the developer - Mulberry - might be focusing their resources on building out the silver of land they have in Jeffrey Park before finishing this Harrison West project.

 


As an aside, this kind of construction interruption is very rare in Central Ohio.  Off-hand I can only recall two recent similar projects halted like this - and they both occurred during the Great Recession:

  • One was the Hickory Chase luxury senior-living development in Hilliard.  Its first phase was nearly complete when its developer - Baltimore-based Erickson Communities - filed for bankruptcy in 2009.  Since then the City of Hilliard bought the two-story clubhouse, donated it to Columbus Public Libraries, who renovated it into a new Hilliard library branch that opened last year.  The remainder of the Hickory Chase development was purchased by a California-based developer, who is building out the project into a 22-building. 492-unit market-rate apartment development:  https://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20171003/hickory-chase-taking-shape

 

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Hyatt extended stay hotel coming to $200M Harrison West development

 

 

A five-story, 152-room Hyatt House is beginning construction this month at 543 W. 5th Ave. in the Founders Park development in Harrison West. Continental Hospitality Group, the development's general contractor, is aiming to open the property in the summer of 2021.

 

Hyatt House is an upscale extended stay brand of Hyatt Corp. that typically features studio and one-bedroom suites with living rooms and bedrooms, as well as central gathering spaces and on-site laundry in addition to other typical hotel amenities. Hyatt has opened 98 of these hotels in 89 cities.

 

image.png.4380ca2411c0a530bf221196ea0d28d5.png

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/11/08/hyatt-extendedstay-hotel-coming-to-200m-harrison.html?iana=hpmvp_colum_news_headline

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^ That Business First article about the Hyatt House extended stay hotel also contained this update about the overall Founders Park development:

Quote

 

Work is well underway on the $200 million Founders Park development off 5th Avenue in Harrison West.  The 21-acre site, formerly owned by Battelle, is set to include 38 single-family homes, 50 townhomes, 342 apartments and a 200-unit senior housing development, as well as a 6.5-acre public park.

 

A joint venture of Fortress Real Estate Cos. and Thrive Cos. – formerly Wagenbrenner Development – are the master developers for the overall Founders Park project, which will also include housing built by M/I Homes and some commercial spaces designed by Daimler Group.  New Avenue Architects & Engineers worked on site design.

 

The city granted incentives for the project last year, including a 10-year, 75% tax abatement for the residential components and a reimbursement from the city of as much as $2.2 million of the developers’ costs associated with creating the public parkland.

 

In return, the incentive requires 10% of the non-senior housing units to be affordable to people making 80% of the area median income and another 10% for those making 100% of the area median income.  For the senior housing units, 10% will be affordable to those making 100% of the area median income for 15 years.

 

 

And if you look carefully at the above update - it contains one other update that I haven't seen before.

 

"Thrive Cos. – formerly Wagenbrenner Development"

 

Apparently, Wagenbrenner Development is now known as Thrive Cos. -- https://thrivecos.com/about

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