Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest grasscat

Covington, KY: Jacob Price Redevelopment

Recommended Posts

Jacob Price residents wary

Covington housing authority stresses there's no decision on razing

By Andy Foltz | Cincinnati Enquirer, February 17, 2005

 

The future of the Jacob Price Homes has not been decided.  Members of the Housing Authority of Covington could not stress that enough in a meeting Wednesday afternoon.  Still, residents of Jacob Price - a 163-unit, rent-subsidized complex in Covington's Eastside - are concerned about the future of their homes. The HAC may demolish the current complex instead of spending $13 million to $16 million on renovating it.

 

"I've been living there for 30 years, and I've been in the area for 64 years," said Barbara Housley. "As hard as I worked to get into Jacob Price, I would cry. I'd rather they just bury me.  Some people believe that this is a done deal, and that we're doing this in a vacuum as far as the community is concerned, and that's not the case," said Bill Simon, executive director of HAC. "We're looking for a solution that is economically feasible and acceptable to all parties."

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050217/NEWS0103/502170365/1059/NEWS01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Community center idea praised

Revitalization plan intrigues college, neighborhood

By Mike Rutledge | Cincinnati Enquirer, April 14, 2005

 

The presidents of Gateway Community and Technical College and Covington's Eastside Neighborhood Association are intrigued by a businessman's plans to buy the closed Northern Kentucky Community Center and return it to public use.

 

Covington businessman and philanthropist Oakley Farris this week told the Enquirer he wants to buy the center and turn it over to a trust that would be controlled by three entities - Gateway, Covington's schools and the community center. Gateway President Ed Hughes - who has wanted to establish a campus within Northern Kentucky's "urban core" of Covington and Newport - said he was eager to discuss the concept with Farris.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050414/NEWS0103/504140364/1059/NEWS01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it time to tear down Jacob Price?

By Jeanne Houck | Kentucky Post, June 30, 2005

 

Residents of Jacob Price Homes will be asked during a survey beginning today what they think of plans to raze the subsidized-housing community in the Eastside and relocate residents in homes scattered throughout the city.  Members of the Jacob Price Residents Council oppose plans by the Housing Authority of Covington to demolish Jacob Price.

 

But residents council President Vivian Cook said Wednesday that members will help distribute the survey written with the help of consultants hired by the housing authority.  Residents who want to complete a survey form can find them today in Apt. 3, an empty apartment near the Jacob Price office often used for residents council meetings, she said.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050630/NEWS02/506300373/1011/RSS02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Housing projects will go

Jacob Price residents to be moved this year

By Cindy Schroeder | Cincinnati Enquirer, May 4, 2006

 

The demolition of Covington's Jacob Price housing projects will begin by year's end, the lawyer for the Housing Authority of Covington said Wednesday. Residents will be relocated. Federal officials told the housing authority's board of directors last week that they've approved tearing down three buildings housing 24 units on Robbins Street, Housing Authority Attorney Steve McMurtry said. Those residents will be moved to vacant apartments within the 163-unit, rent-subsidized complex on Covington's Eastside.

 

The Housing Authority of Covington plans to make an announcement on the future of Jacob Price this afternoon. The housing authority's plan calls for tearing down all 23 buildings in the Jacob Price complex at Prospect Avenue and Robbins Street, McMurtry said. The demolition would be done in four phases.

 

Although the housing authority has estimated it will take about five years to demolish the complex, the timetable will be largely determined by funding, McMurtry said. The full plan has yet to be approved by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, but HUD's regional office in Louisville has given its blessing, he said. Once approval is granted, the next step would be securing low-cost housing tax credits from the Kentucky Housing Corp.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.nky.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20060504/NEWS0103/605040375

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Demolition work is under way

Jacob Price is being razed

By Greg Paeth | Kentucky Post, November 9, 2006

 

Covington has started tearing down its 67-year-old public housing project to make way for future development.  Work began Tuesday to demolish three of the 23 buildings in the Jacob Price housing complex in the city's troubled Eastside neighborhood.  It's the start of a four-year process to level the entire complex, said Tom Schmitz, interim executive director of the Covington Housing Authority.

 

Covington is following a similar path as neighboring Newport, which in February began tearing down its public housing along the Licking and Ohio rivers. Northern Kentucky developer Corporex Co. plans a 13-acre retail, office, entertainment and upscale housing development on that site.  Long-range plans for Covington's six-acre tract are undecided, Schmitz said. Options include a new housing complex that would be run by the housing authority, or selling the property to a private developer, he said.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061109/NEWS02/611090340/1014

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jacob Price residents could avoid eviction

By Mike Rutledge | Cincinnati Enquirer, March 6, 2008

 

Some residents of Jacob Price public housing project will receive another chance to continue living there, despite violating a newly enforced policy about rent payments.

 

"We are working with other agencies to try to arrange for 'payees' for individuals - maybe they don't have the best excuse in the world to pay late, but if they're willing to pay through a payee, or a professional third party, then we'd be willing to make an exception," said Adrian Early, director of operations for the Housing Authority of Covington.

 

Two agencies, Welcome House and FreestoreFoodbank, are among those that can receive residents' paychecks and pay their rent and other bills, Early said. At Welcome House, for example, "they'll charge a very nominal monthly fee, basically to have your check from work or your benefit check deposited to them, and then they pay your bills for you - and make sure it's done timely," he said.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.nky.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20080306/NEWS0103/803060384

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is  ashame this is happening to these people.  I had the chance to work on a studio project a few years ago in Jacob Price.  Very, very nice people.  Rando, I think you were apart of that too?  These buildings did need to go, the old army barracks style was not very sufficient for modern day living.  Let's just hope they will be able to find a better place to live and be allowed to still have the subsidized rent available to them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Renters at Price resent policy

Late payers told to establish payee

BY Mike Rutledge | CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, March 7, 2008

 

Residents of the Jacob Price housing project should not be forced to use third parties to pay their rent when it was the Housing Authority of Covington that was in the wrong in changing its rent policies without proper notification, residents and local advocates said Thursday.  Also, the two agencies that Adrian Early of the housing authority said could serve as payees for Jacob Price residents apparently cannot do so.

 

"We don't have ... the resources or the personnel power" to handle payee services for Jacob Price, said Tina Carnevale of Welcome House, one of the agencies Early said could provide the service. Members of the housing project's residents' council said they were told the other agency, FreestoreFoodbank, does not provide payee services to Kentuckians.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.nky.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20080307/NEWS0103/803070401

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jacob Price on housing agenda

 

The city's housing authority is speeding up its timetable for determining what should be done with the 6-acre property occupied by the Jacob Price public-housing projects, officials announced Monday.  The Housing Authority of Covington soon will demolish three more Jacob Price buildings, containing 30 apartments, in Covington's Eastside neighborhood. If the authority stays on schedule, the site will be leveled by July 2010.

 

The brainstorming - not only for the Jacob Price property, but for the surrounding area - begins tonight, when officials from consulting firm Gilmore Kean LLC of Washington, D.C., take suggestions from residents, business people and agency officials about what they would like to see happen.  The meeting will happen at 6:30 tonight at Howard Hall, 25 E. 11th St.

 

Read full article here:

http://nky.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20080930/NEWS0103/809300378

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Redevelopment plans continue to evolve for Jacob Price site in Covington

http://www.soapboxmedia.com/devnews/1013jacobprice.aspx

By Randy A. Simes | Soapbox Cincinnati, October 13, 2009

 

For years the Jacob Price housing site (map) in Covington has been a hot bed for discussion amongst residents, community leaders, urban planners and even the casual observer.  The discussion is similar to one previously had in Cincinnati's West End where consolidated housing projects were replaced by a mixture of market rate and affordable housing units in addition to some retail - all of which was done in a smaller more human scale than the previous Corbusier style housing that previously existed.

 

In Covington's Jacob Price housing projects there are no towers in the sky, but the block style approach is easily identifiable in the 70-year-old development.  As a result, community members are looking to take back the community with a better urban design and plan that encompasses a variety of uses, income levels and architectural styles.

 

In 2006, the City of Covington began demolishing the Jacob Price housing project piece-by-piece leaving only about two-thirds of the original number of housing units behind.  City officials expect another two years are needed to completely demolish the site with redevelopment plans following.

 

Recent plans by the Housing Authority of Covington include income mixing, more businesses, and more owner-occupied homes in the heart of Covington - something that residents feel will help reduce crime and raise property values in the nearby area.

 

Like the City West development in Cincinnati's West End neighborhood, Covington will apply for a Hope VI grant this November.  The $20 million grant would help spur the development of 117 new or newly renovated rental units on the Jacob Price housing site as well as the renovation of some surrounding properties.

 

Of the rental units, approximately 30 percent will be market rate, 30 percent preserved for tenants making under 60 percent of the average median income for the region, and the remaining 40 percent would be developed as public housing units - some of which would include senior living units.

 

In 2005, the Jacobs Price housing site was studied by University of Cincinnati planning students who proposed a variety of redevelopment strategies for the site with many focusing around the development of new park space for city residents in addition to new housing options.

 

The current plan is also expected to include more greenspace and could get started as early as 2011 if Covington secures the necessary grant funds.

 

jacobprice_520.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High hopes for housing in Covington

Mixed-income units designed to appeal to all

5:11 AM, Oct. 24, 2011 

Written by

Mike Rutledge

 

 

COVINGTON - Apartments that will replace the Jacob Price public housing projects in Covington's Eastside neighborhood will be so attractive that even people who won't need public assistance will want to live in them, city officials believe.

 

And people who aren't poor will, in fact, be allowed - and invited - to rent some of them.

 

http://nky.cincinnati.com/article/AB/20111023/NEWS0103/110240334/High-hopes-housing?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|FRONTPAGE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...