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Cleveland: Cleveland State University: Development and News

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There's enough unused open space on CSU's campus.  Whether or not this is because of the low quality of the space or if there aren't enough people interested in populating it, I don't know at this point.

If the university needs anything though, without a doubt it's a higher density of different uses at street level, engaging the street and sidewalk, and defining Euclid Avenue as the main focus of the university.  Another campus green in addition to the one at the Levin Urban Affairs Building (E18th and Euclid Ave) will do absolutely nothing for campus or city life.

 

While there is decent amount of open space, there isn't any well-planned open space. If there were at least a small quad that was surrounded by dorms that opened up to it, you would encourage more lively interaction. CSU needs some kids with frisbees and hacky-sacks who will enjoy hanging out on campus. I agree that we need more diverse uses on Euclid, but that is all part of the plan. CSU needs both if it wants to move towards a residential college that creates a lot of vibrant street life.

 

I would rather see mixed-use than open space, and if it's to be open space I certainly don't want bare grass.  A nice quad surrounded by dorms would work.  That is, something mid-block and surrounded by buildings.  NOT another suburban lawn fronting a major downtown street.  Grass for the sake of grass, which most "green space" seems to be these days, is no good at all.  That we have too much of throughout the city.  Unfortunately the majority of Euclid through there is already developed, much of it with ugly buildings that don't belong.  So we're only talking about the area to the north.

 

That's absolutely right.  Having residences surrounding this green space is key.  Forcing students to walk by it to go to class, the rec, etc will liven the space.  Green space without any intention or reasoning wouldn't benefit the area.  Given the proximity to the dorms and CSU's vision to have kids on/near campus, this would be a better fit than the ballpark.

In addition, eliminate both 380 parking lots.

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http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2009/04/clevelandmarshall_college_of_l.html

 

Cleveland-Marshall College of Law plans to build new mock trial courtroom

by Alison Grant/Plain Dealer Reporter

Monday April 20, 2009, 5:08 PM

 

 

CLEVELAND -- Justice is for sale in Cleveland.

 

A judge can be had for $100,000. Defense lawyers for $50,000. A juror for $10,000.

 

This isn't some John Grisham-type scheme to bribe the court, though. These sums are for enhancing legal justice.

 

The Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University is appealing to attorneys and law firms to chip in on a $1 million mock trial courtroom. Naming rights for features of the room, from the judge's bench to an individual jury seat, are one way to contribute. A style show fund-raiser Wednesday evening, organized by female lawyers in Cleveland, is another...

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Where exactly will this room go?

 

If I had to guess, it would be in the part of the building that used to be the library.  That would be the wing that jettisons out to the east.  Depends on how big they want to make it.  Some of the lecture halls could provide a smaller option.

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Where exactly will this room go?

 

If I had to guess, it would be in the part of the building that used to be the library. That would be the wing that jettisons out to the east. Depends on how big they want to make it. Some of the lecture halls could provide a smaller option.

 

But that section was built into new classrooms, boardrooms, and clinics just last year.  No way they tear it up again...?

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Where exactly will this room go?

If I had to guess, it would be in the part of the building that used to be the library.  That would be the wing that jettisons out to the east.  Depends on how big they want to make it.  Some of the lecture halls could provide a smaller option.

 

But that section was built into new classrooms, boardrooms, and clinics just last year.  No way they tear it up again...?

 

I wasn't aware the old library had been adapted for other uses.  I guess that would leave one of the larger lecture halls as the only option.  Specifically, maybe the one on the second floor that sits on top of the connection between the main atrium and the library?

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Maybe they are putting it in the space where the lockers currently are.  I know those go-getters on SBA are looking to purchase new lockers.  Or, maybe where the cafeteria is, and find another space for the cafe.

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Maybe they are putting it in the space where the lockers currently are. I know those go-getters on SBA are looking to purchase new lockers. Or, maybe where the cafeteria is, and find another space for the cafe.

 

The new locker purchase fell apart... not sure what happened.  Maybe it was too financially ambitious.  It doesn't seem like any of these spots is big enough, except maybe the big lecture hall mentioned above, formerly known as Sea World.  But they need that room for big classes.  I'm wondering if maybe they'll expand the building eastward.  There is a lot of empty space there, the Corlett building is doomed, and I think plans for the new arts building have been shelved.

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The Gavel said the new courtroom will be on the ground floor of the old library where the clinic offices used to be. I never really venture over to that part of the building but wasn't it just rennovated?

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I have come to understand that the wind turbine (box) is in the process of being built/placed on the roof of the maintenance building.  Anyone seen any evidence of such activity?

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^Funny you should mention that.  I was just going to say that I saw the construction of the box/cylinder portion of it today.  It is being constructed on the ground on the West side of the building and should be hoisted up in a few days, possibly over the weekend. 

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This is in front of the Chester I-90 West on-ramp. CSU Maintenance Bldg on left. This is freestanding and not on top or connected to the building itself:

 

<img src="http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt189/cleveland_ohio/IMG_1641.jpg">

 

<img src="http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt189/cleveland_ohio/IMG_1642.jpg">

 

<img src="http://i610.photobucket.com/albums/tt189/cleveland_ohio/IMG_1643.jpg">

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^It will be hoisted on to the top of the building at some point.  I believe it will resemble a water tower with 4 turbines surrounding it.  I saw a rendering of it a while ago and it looked exactly like a water tower.  Funny they have to build a water tower to study the use of wind turbines on the side of a water tower... but whatever.

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CSU College of Education Bldg:

 

Spring2009097.jpg

 

Spring2009098.jpg

 

 

CSU Student Center

Spring2009099.jpg

 

Spring2009100.jpg

 

Spring2009103.jpg

 

Marous Bros Construction on south side of Euclid, across from Corlett

Spring2009101.jpg

 

Spring2009102.jpg

 

Spring2009104.jpg

 

Spring2009105.jpg

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whats ha'apin girl in yellow in the 6th picture, haha.

These few buildings are going to do wonders for that part of Euclid ave. Hopefully once developers see the success of these it will kickstart other development with the other buildings and empty lots in the area.

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^Good find.

 

I know this isn't the appropriate place, but is there a rhyme or reason as to the size of the street signs?  Back in the day, I remember the street signs being a much smaller blue sign.  Then, about 10-15(?) years ago, they went to the bigger street signs (evidenced by the pic with the seemingly hot chick in yellow).  Now, around the Clinic, I notice the smaller blue street signs.  Are only the main intersections getting the big blue ones?  Anyone know what the hell I am talking about?

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whats ha'apin girl in yellow in the 6th picture, haha.

These few buildings are going to do wonders for that part of Euclid ave. Hopefully once developers see the success of these it will kickstart other development with the other buildings and empty lots in the area.

 

um, playa, don't you have a girlfriend??

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whats ha'apin girl in yellow in the 6th picture, haha.

These few buildings are going to do wonders for that part of Euclid ave. Hopefully once developers see the success of these it will kickstart other development with the other buildings and empty lots in the area.

 

um, playa, don't you have a girlfriend??

 

True, but that doesnt mean i still cant look

 

 

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whats ha'apin girl in yellow in the 6th picture, haha.

These few buildings are going to do wonders for that part of Euclid ave. Hopefully once developers see the success of these it will kickstart other development with the other buildings and empty lots in the area.

 

um, playa, don't you have a girlfriend??

 

True, but that doesnt mean i still cant look

 

 

Touche!

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Looks like she's got bad hair, but otherwise...

 

You're a straight man, do you really care what her hair looks like?

 

I know...I know...way of topic

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Looks like she's got bad hair, but otherwise...

 

You're a straight man, do you really care what her hair looks like?

 

 

FYI yes we do kinda care about that.  Probably not as much as girls think we do, but we do.

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Looks like she's got bad hair, but otherwise...

 

You're a straight man, do you really care what her hair looks like?

 

 

FYI yes we do kinda care about that.  Probably not as much as girls think we do, but we do.

 

Who knew??  Ya learn something new everyday.

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^Good find.

 

I know this isn't the appropriate place, but is there a rhyme or reason as to the size of the street signs? Back in the day, I remember the street signs being a much smaller blue sign. Then, about 10-15(?) years ago, they went to the bigger street signs (evidenced by the pic with the seemingly hot chick in yellow). Now, around the Clinic, I notice the smaller blue street signs. Are only the main intersections getting the big blue ones? Anyone know what the hell I am talking about?

 

I seem to remember a discussion about this a long while ago in the Avenue District thread.  Take a look in there.

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The new solar/wind study they are building at the CSU maintenance building is almost complete. It now looks like a water tower and has the CSU logo all over it. It is going to standout when it hits the top of the building. Very nice.

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http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/06/cleveland_state_university_to_1.html

 

Cleveland State University to keep Wright Center after revising plan

Posted by Janet Okoben/The Plain Dealer June 09, 2009 16:22PM

Categories: Real Time News

 

Cleveland State University can keep a $24 million grant for the Wright Center for Sensor Systems Engineering.

 

CLEVELAND — Cleveland State University's $23 million state-funded center for sensor technology is back in business with the blessing of state leaders, just months after the university risked losing the whole project because of management issues.

 

CSU remains the host of the Wright Center for Sensor Systems Engineering, the formal name of the project, which is charged with helping businesses develop new products. Prospective companies must prove that their technologies or products will be commercially marketable within three years, according to the new plan.

 

More at http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/06/cleveland_state_university_to_1.html

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^ Ah thanks, I just drove by that a few days ago and had no clue what it was. Is that parking on the upper levels?

 

that is all csu parking.  the transit center hasn't started yet.  it will be on the surface lot that is immediately north of the parking garage.

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from Cleveland Scene: http://www.clevescene.com/cleveland/positive-spin/Content?oid=1593269

 

 

POSITIVE SPIN

CSU prof makes wind turbines city-friendly

by Nik Salontay

 

 

On the roof of Cleveland State University's plant-services building, four wind turbines hang off the side of a 20-by-25-foot cylinder. A large motorized truss atop the cylinder turns them toward the wind every few minutes. Another turbine spins slowly nearby. It's the control that will determine whether the setup is the forbearer of a renewable energy revolution or a $400,000 method for scaring birds away from water towers.

 

"Make sure you point out in your story how the control turbine isn't spinning," says Dr. Majid Rashidi, builder of this elaborate experiment.

 

The control turbine isn't spinning, but the other four, attached to the cylinder, are whirling away. "The cylinder basically amplifies the energy," Rashidi explains, "It makes the turbines happier."

 

And happy turbines produce more power.

 

A Clevelander for 31 years, Dr. Rashidi earned his Ph.D in mechanical engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 1987, and after a brief stint at NASA's Glenn Research Center (back when it was the Lewis Research Center), he began teaching at CSU. After 22 years of teaching, he's now chairman of the engineering technology department. Armed with $1.5 million of funding from the state of Ohio and the U.S. Department of Energy, he's been working hard on this prototype since 2005.

 

As wind hits the cylinder, it's forced around the sides, amplifying the wind velocity around it by roughly 1.8 times. A computer system measures wind direction and controls a motor that adjusts the turbines automatically to catch it. In theory, this should result in turbines that produce as much as four times more energy than normal. According to Rashidi, the turbines each generate about two kilowatts of electricity. Together, the prototype's four turbines generate enough electricity to power eight typical households.

 

Of course, it's still a theory. As the wind flies in from constantly changing directions, the system isn't always able to adjust itself quickly enough. There are awkward moments when the control is spinning wildly while the tower sits still, waiting to be reoriented. Rashidi admits there were still some kinks in the prototype's computer system, but project manager Jon Erdmann reported later that the problems had been sorted out.

 

"There's really no rulebook that says, 'This is how you chase the wind'," says Erdmann. "When you're inventing something, you have to expect there to be some kinks to work out."

 

With the tower in working order, the next step is to begin collecting a year of constant data to prove the concept's validity. "So far, I'm very pleased with the results," says Rashidi.

 

Rashidi's concept is hardly the first design to generate that level of wind-energy production. But what sets it apart from the dozens of other prototypes in the high-hype renewable-energy market is its potential in the urban environment. Most turbine designs, like the massive one in front of the Great Lakes Science Center, are impractical for city use because of their size. He calls this prototype a "design evolution" — more compact and affordable than previous turbines.

 

The sprawl of large buildings in cities usually cuts wind speed below what's necessary to create wind energy affordably. Plus, Rashidi's cylinder nearly doubles the velocity of the wind, making turbines effective in areas with much lower wind speed. The turbines are smaller too. Each turbine is about 7 feet in diameter — compared to the 88-foot turbine standing in front of the science center — allowing them to be installed on buildings without the danger and cost of other designs. Making it even more affordable, Rashidi points out that the cityscape is riddled with cylinders like water towers, chimneys and silos, just waiting to have his turbines strapped alongside them.

 

The idea isn't just to cover Cleveland in wind turbines, but to produce them here as well. Every part of the project was created in Cleveland except the turbines themselves, and there's no reason why they can't be made in town as well.

 

"I hope this creates some kind of economic impact in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio," says Rashidi.

 

There is talk that Rashidi is planning to install at least one more wind turbine in the city. According to Erdmann, the next project will be based on Rashidi's earlier design — a 15-foot wide spiraling tower with multiple turbines placed on it. Those involved aren't ready to make the location public yet but have described the site as "extremely high-profile."

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This got mentioned in some thread, I don't remember which, but apparently it wasn't here.  The Cortlett/Cadillac building is undergoing some kind of demo.  It's still difficult to tell if it's partial or complete, but there's a small crane there and a big hole knocked in the side of the building.

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Hi All,

 

Longtime lurker, first time poster.  Geez, I'm nervous.  I feel like Tom Watson standing over yesterday's putt on eighteen.  Here's hoping I don't end up with one of those 'this topic has been pruned...' deals.  Anyway, caught this in the Cleveland Stater and thought you all might like to read.  Some really good stuff happening down at CSU.  Don't care for the FieldTurf playing surface, but sounds promising otherwise.

 

http://www.csuohio.edu/class/com/clevelandstater/Archives/Vol%2011/Issue%202/sports1.html

 

New baseball field highlights CSU expansion plan

BY NICK CAMINO

 

What began as a simple exploratory discussion of campus expansion in 2003 is becoming viable at Cleveland State University, and construction of a brand-new varsity baseball field is the central focus of the project’s development.

 

The entire project, which also included improved campus housing, along with new parking lots, went out for public bids and received five different proposals, according to Vice President for Business Affairs and Finance Jack Boyle.

 

“We are currently in the process of evaluating all the proposals,” Boyle said. “If there is a viable bidder, the board could award a contract this summer and construction could start in 2010 with completion in 2011.”

 

A new field in downtown Cleveland would not only benefit the Cleveland State Vikings baseball team, but a number of other prominent components to the city as well, Boyle explained.

 

“The Cleveland Indians have expressed interest in using the field for their summer instructional program and St. Ignatius High School has expressed interest in using the field for its games,” Boyle said. “It would be an artificial turf field, so it could also be used for concerts and other campus outdoor activities.”

 

Building a new field is a very realistic goal, but there are a number of hurdles to go over, said third-year Cleveland State head baseball coach Kevin Kocks.

 

The largest single hurdle is simple, the price.

 

The stadium itself could cost $5 million to $8 million, but that has not hindered the board of trustees or the athletic department from going forward with the discussions about the construction of a new baseball field, Boyle said.

To say that Cleveland State needs this type of facility is an understatement, Kocks said.

 

“Our baseball program is struggling right now,” Kocks said, referring to his Vikings’ underwhelming win-loss record over the past few seasons. “But if you give us a $5 million to $8 million facility in downtown Cleveland right on campus, it will give us an above-average recruiting edge and will help us compete consistently with Mid-American Conference and Big Ten schools.”

 

The Pipe Yard, Cleveland State’s current home stadium, is located 40 minutes away from campus in Lorain, Ohio.

Despite the beautiful facility in Lorain, the ultimate goal is to be downtown, Kocks said.

 

“We coaches teach our players to respect great facilities, and if we had one in downtown Cleveland, that is exactly what we would do,” Kocks said. “Anything we can get closer to campus would be a blessing,” he added.

 

Players on the team simply enjoy playing the game of baseball, but a stadium downtown would be ideal, senior first baseman John Brown said.

 

“Being downtown would give the student body, as well as more faculty, an opportunity to support the team,” Brown explained. “It would create a good atmosphere.”

 

After six years of discussion and preparation, it is exciting to finally see these plans in the works, Boyle said.

“[What is] particularly exciting is the enthusiasm of the developers who spend a lot of time and money to put together extremely exciting proposals for the campus,” Boyle said.

 

“Right now there are so many great things going on here at Cleveland State with the new president of the university and this impressive new expansion plan,” Kocks said.

 

“This is the closest we have ever been to getting a new stadium on campus,” he added.

 

“That fact, coupled with other elements of the newly proposed campus transformation, makes this an exciting place to be and, hopefully, a place where we can begin to win some championships.”

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That's a good image to get an idea of what is going on for this area.  Two thoughts- One, I wish they would "wrap" those parking garages with some sort of use, instead of leaving them exposed, almost boldly standing out.  Two, I hope they buy extra window panes for the units around the baseball field.  Am I the only one here who's familiar with Dennis the Menace?

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I just hope they open the field up to the entire student body any time the baseball team isnt using it.

And i HATE, HATE, HATE, HATE, HATE field turf as well.

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I'd assume they'd get some form of impact resistant glass. It's commonly used in buildings in Hurricane prone areas in the south. I should hope it would be able to take a baseball.

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I just hope they open the field up to the entire student body any time the baseball team isnt using it.

And i HATE, HATE, HATE, HATE, HATE field turf as well.

 

Well sadly you'll have to pick one or the other since the statement is contradictory.  Having a collegiate field with real grass pretty much locks the gates on any other use.  Having field turf would allow for more use, but again, I can't imagine it'll be open season to use if the baseball team isn't on it.  The most I can imagine is it being allowed to be used for intramurals and university sanctioned events.  Although, I'd love to have a pickup game on it :)

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