Jump to content
UncleRando

Ohio Census / Population Trends

Recommended Posts

I'd definitely say the latter. There seems to have been a rise in "amenities cities" in the past decade or longer, most notably with Portland and Denver, but also to a lesser extent places like New Orleans and Missoula. NOLA in particular is interesting since it doesn't seem like there has been all that much economic growth down there, but the post-Katrina housing prices are getting pretty outrageous.


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd definitely say the latter. There seems to have been a rise in "amenities cities" in the past decade or longer, most notably with Portland and Denver, but also to a lesser extent places like New Orleans and Missoula. NOLA in particular is interesting since it doesn't seem like there has been all that much economic growth down there, but the post-Katrina housing prices are getting pretty outrageous.

 

I have recently read that New Orleans is fairly insular. That by its nature it just isn't desirous of drawing a significant number of newcomers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a big fan of their methodology.  People in that age bracket don't just move to a place, they also grow up there naturally, and that population counts the same, IMO. There isn't some reason to think that Millennials that are from a specific city are wholly different than those that move there, so it makes more sense to me to show the overall change in population of that age group. 

 

Doesn't who "counts" entirely depend on what you're trying to measure? If you're trying to measure where Millennials are moving, you don't count those who are staying in place.

 

They don't actually say how they got those numbers other than saying from the Census and using 1-year ACS estimates, but not specifically which ones.  They don't answer if this only included domestic movers rather than also international, for example.  Also, even using ACS 1-year data, it only includes previous residences of those who moved TO a particular city, not those moving away, so it doesn't explain where they got those net numbers.  There is no acknowledgement that the 20-34 population may not actually represent the Millennial population.  The start and end year for that generation is not agreed upon, and some of the older fringe has already aged out of that range but would still otherwise be Millennials.  So all they're really doing is showing the growth of that specific age group presumably only for domestic migration.  It's not really a Millennial comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cincinnati and Columbus both rank in top 25 for net millennial gain.

 

https://smartasset.com/mortgage/where-are-millennials-moving-2018-edition

 

I'm not a big fan of their methodology.  People in that age bracket don't just move to a place, they also grow up there naturally, and that population counts the same, IMO. There isn't some reason to think that Millennials that are from a specific city are wholly different than those that move there, so it makes more sense to me to show the overall change in population of that age group. 

 

It's millenniasl moving there minus the millennials leaving so it captures people who grow up somewhere and stay there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a big fan of their methodology.  People in that age bracket don't just move to a place, they also grow up there naturally, and that population counts the same, IMO. There isn't some reason to think that Millennials that are from a specific city are wholly different than those that move there, so it makes more sense to me to show the overall change in population of that age group. 

 

Doesn't who "counts" entirely depend on what you're trying to measure? If you're trying to measure where Millennials are moving, you don't count those who are staying in place.

 

They don't actually say how they got those numbers other than saying from the Census and using 1-year ACS estimates, but not specifically which ones.  They don't answer if this only included domestic movers rather than also international, for example.  Also, even using ACS 1-year data, it only includes previous residences of those who moved TO a particular city, not those moving away, so it doesn't explain where they got those net numbers.  There is no acknowledgement that the 20-34 population may not actually represent the Millennial population.  The start and end year for that generation is not agreed upon, and some of the older fringe has already aged out of that range but would still otherwise be Millennials.  So all they're really doing is showing the growth of that specific age group presumably only for domestic migration.  It's not really a Millennial comparison.

 

It's net migration, so it includes both domestic and international. I'm not sure I understand your comment about destination-location? All you need is migration, who is leaving and who is staying, to compile this list. It doesn't matter if the people leaving Cincy are moving to LA or San Fran or Houston. They're still migrating away. 1980 to 1996 are the birth years most commonly used for millenials, so that would put them at 22 to 38 years old right now, give or take. 20 to 34 is the age bracket reported by the Census Bureau so it's the closest approximation available for the data.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cincinnati and Columbus both rank in top 25 for net millennial gain.

 

https://smartasset.com/mortgage/where-are-millennials-moving-2018-edition

 

I'm not a big fan of their methodology.  People in that age bracket don't just move to a place, they also grow up there naturally, and that population counts the same, IMO. There isn't some reason to think that Millennials that are from a specific city are wholly different than those that move there, so it makes more sense to me to show the overall change in population of that age group. 

 

It's millenniasl moving there minus the millennials leaving so it captures people who grow up somewhere and stay there.

 

That would just be migration, not natural growth.  I looked at the 2016 1-year estimates for mobility/migration and I haven't been able to find any combination that matches their numbers.  There's not enough information to know what they used. 

 

BTW, here are the numbers for major Ohio cities 2005-2016 in terms of the total change in that age group, which would be the net of both migration and natural growth.

 

2005-2016

Akron: 0

Canton: -1,346

Cincinnati: +13,505

Cleveland: +11,519

Columbus: +55,851

Dayton: +8,053

Toledo: +264

Youngstown: -1,536

 

2010-2016

Akron: +1,462

Canton: -626

Cincinnati: +531

Cleveland: +6,673

Columbus: +21,084

Dayton: +4,680

Toledo: -2,268

Youngstown: -1,137

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change for 20-34 over time isn't a good measure, because lots of people in the group in 2005 or 2010 have aged out by 2016, just as people who were too young in 2005 or 2010 will be counted in 2016. Did you move the ages around? 9-23 in 2005 and 14-28 in 2010?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change for 20-34 over time isn't a good measure, because lots of people in the group in 2005 or 2010 have aged out by 2016, just as people who were too young in 2005 or 2010 will be counted in 2016. Did you move the ages around? 9-23 in 2005 and 14-28 in 2010?

 

You're right, and that's why I made the comment about that link not really being about Millennials, but about just the change in that age group at the time.  I made that same comparison for the numbers above that was used in the link, only over a greater time and using total change rather than just supposedly migration. 

 

The closest thing I could find to what the other site did was to look at mobility 2015-2016.

 

Here were the total numbers of people who moved to each city in that 20-34 age group 2015-2016 from outside the city.

 

Akron: +4892

Cincinnati: +13,030

Cleveland: +6,230

Columbus: +27,270

Dayton: +2,911

Toledo: +4,765

Youngstown: +1,085

 

Basically if someone could point me to the specific numbers they used, I would appreciate it.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have those numbers for Lakewood and Cleveland Heights? I'd be interested to add those two to CLE's total, because I think they get a lot of that population, where in Cbus and in Cincy they mostly go to the city proper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have those numbers for Lakewood and Cleveland Heights? I'd be interested to add those two to CLE's total, because I think they get a lot of that population, where in Cbus and in Cincy they mostly go to the city proper.

 

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t

 

Use the buttons on the left to find any information you're looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Census released demographic estimates for counties and metros yesterday.  I looked at the numbers for the 3-Cs.

 

Total Non-Hispanic White By Core County 2017 and change from 2010.

Cuyahoga: 738,951 -48,594

Franklin: 819,604 +34,506

Hamilton: 532,187 -11,314

 

Metro Non-Hispanic White Total and change from 2010.

Cincinnati: 1,747,284 +5,757

Cleveland: 1,440,587 -51,786

Columbus: 1,520,204 +59,267

 

Non-Hispanic White % of Total Population by Core County in 2010 and 2017

Cuyahoga

2010: 61.5%

2017: 59.2%

Franklin

2010: 67.5%

2017: 63.4%

Hamilton

2010: 67.7%

2017: 65.4%

 

Non-Hispanic White % of Total Metro Population in 2010 and 2017.

Cincinnati:

2010: 81.8%

2017: 79.6%

Cleveland

2010: 71.8%

2017: 70.0%

Columbus

2010: 76.8%

2017: 73.1%

 

Non-Hispanic White % Change 2010-2017 by Core County

Cuyahoga: -6.2%

Franklin: +4.4%

Hamilton: -2.1%

 

Non-Hispanic White % Change 2010-2017 by Metro

Cincinnati: +0.3%

Columbus: +4.1%

Cleveland: -3.5%

 

 

Non-Hispanic Black Total By Core County in 2017 and change from 2010

Cuyahoga: 369,766 -6,120

Franklin: 292,139 +46,782

Hamilton: 213,053 +7,588

 

Metro Non-Hispanic Black Total and change from 2010.

Cincinnati: 272,079 +17,178

Cleveland: 407,130 -3,560

Columbus: 325,339 +53,433

 

Non-Hispanic Black % of Total Population by Core County in 2010 and 2017

Cuyahoga

2010: 29.4%

2017: 29.6%

Franklin

2010: 21.1%

2017: 22.6%

Hamilton

2010: 25.6%

2017: 26.2%

 

Non-Hispanic Black % of Total Metro Population in 2010 and 2017.

Cincinnati:

2010: 12.0%

2017: 12.4%

Cleveland

2010: 19.8%

2017: 19.8%

Columbus

2010: 14.3%

2017: 15.7%

 

Non-Hispanic Black % Change 2010-2017 by Core County

Cuyahoga: -1.6%

Franklin: +19.1%

Hamilton: +3.7%

 

Non-Hispanic Black % Change 2010-2017 by Metro

Cincinnati: +6.7%

Columbus: +19.7

Cleveland: -0.9%

 

 

Non-Hispanic Asian Total By Core County in 2017 and change from 2010

Cuyahoga: 39,917 +6,779

Franklin: 68,700 +23,350

Hamilton: 21,969 +5,609

 

Metro Non-Hispanic Asian Total and change from 2010.

Cincinnati: 57,543 +16,739

Cleveland: 49,937 +9,215

Columbus: 90,098 +32,269

 

Non-Hispanic Asian % of Total Population by Core County in 2010 and 2017

Cuyahoga

2010: 2.6%

2017: 3.2%

Franklin

2010: 3.9%

2017: 5.3%

Hamilton

2010: 2.0%

2017: 2.7%

 

Non-Hispanic Asian % of Total Metro Population in 2010 and 2017.

Cincinnati:

2010: 1.9%

2017: 2.6%

Cleveland

2010: 2.0%

2017: 2.4%

Columbus

2010: 3.0%

2017: 4.3%

 

Non-Hispanic Asian % Change 2010-2017 by Core County

Cuyahoga: +20.5%

Franklin: +51.5%

Hamilton: +34.3%

 

Non-Hispanic Asian % Change 2010-2017 by Metro

Cincinnati: +41.0%

Columbus: +55.8%

Cleveland: +22.4%

 

 

Hispanic Total By Core County in 2017 and change from 2010

Cuyahoga: 73,989 +12,719

Franklin: 70,887 +15,169

Hamilton: 26,649 +6,042

 

Metro Hispanic Total and change from 2010.

Cincinnati: 70,623 +15,503

Cleveland: 119,797 +21,664

Columbus: 86,431 +19,578

 

Hispanic % of Total Population by Core County in 2010 and 2017

Cuyahoga

2010: 4.8%

2017: 5.9%

Franklin

2010: 4.8%

2017: 5.5%

Hamilton

2010: 2.6%

2017: 3.3%

 

Hispanic % of Total Metro Population in 2010 and 2017.

Cincinnati

2010: 2.6%

2017: 3.2%

Cleveland

2010: 4.7%

2017: 5.8%

Columbus

2010: 3.5%

2017: 4.2%

 

Hispanic % Change 2010-2017 by Core County

Cuyahoga: +20.8%

Franklin: +27.2%

Hamilton: +29.3%

 

Hispanic % Change 2010-2017 by Metro

Cincinnati: +28.1%

Columbus: +29.3%

Cleveland: +22.1%

 

 

Non-Hispanic Other Total By Core County in 2017 and change from 2010

Cuyahoga: 25,891 +3,608

Franklin: 40,651 +8,760

Hamilton: 19,964 +3,523

 

Metro Non-Hispanic Other Total and change from 2010.

Cincinnati: 46,972 +9,173

Cleveland: 41,393 +6,161

Columbus: 56,653 +12,204

 

Non-Hispanic Other % of Total Population by Core County in 2010 and 2017

Cuyahoga

2010: 1.7%

2017: 2.1%

Franklin

2010: 2.7%

2017: 3.2%

Hamilton

2010: 2.1%

2017: 2.5%

 

Non-Hispanic Other % of Total Metro Population in 2010 and 2017.

Cincinnati:

2010: 1.8%

2017: 2.1%

Cleveland

2010: 1.7%

2017: 2.0%

Columbus

2010: 2.3%

2017: 2.7%

 

Non-Hispanic Other % Change 2010-2017 by Core County

Cuyahoga: +16.2%

Franklin: +27.5%

Hamilton: +21.4%

 

Non-Hispanic Other % Change 2010-2017 by Metro

Cincinnati: +24.3%

Columbus: +27.5%

Cleveland: +17.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ I hope with our economy doing well and with a NEED for more housing, we can attract more hispanic immigrants. My parents live on the far west side next to a Mexican family that has done very, very well with construction work-they transformed the house they bought, especially the inside, since they work on exclusive homes in Dublin, etc. They are the best family to live in that house in over 20 years.  F**k the xenophobic crazy anti-immigrant stance that the nation's leadership has seemed to embrace.

 

As a city Columbus should continue to reach out to and actively pursue ethnic, religious, or racial minorities (and especially persecuted groups like LGBTQ in areas like the Middle East, Africa, etc. )-the city and region is growing fast and can make a good case for moving here.  I don't know how much the city alone can do, but it should do whatever it can to attract these people, especially if they can somehow manage to make it to the US on their own. And yes, this should be a sanctuary city to the hilt. JMHO

 

*This Mexican family has also been very gracious in helping my parents with various small projects in their home, and even sometimes mowing their yard-as my parents are 90 and 85 years old and these small things help them remain in their own home independently.

 

I wonder what Cbus and other Ohio cities are actually doing to attract immigrants. Is there a special department or something in the city that markets the city to certain specific groups like these minority groups?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey jonoh81[/member], can you do Dayton, Akron, Toledo, and Youngstown?  I'm just curious.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So it seems that the bulk of Cleveland's population decline comes from the Black/African American population. The population dropped by around 4,000 from 2015 to 2016 while virtually every other group grew. Seeing how the east side is predominately black and also is in TERRIBLE shape, which in turn has led to massive flight, this isn't surprising. Stabilize the Black population and I feel we will see Cleveland's population stabilize as well.

 

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_16_5YR_B03002&prodType=table

 

42984983651_0f96c84bb5_c.jpgScreen Shot 2018-06-24 at 12.26.24 PM by dwainross34, on Flickr

 

42083440105_ee068b1246_c.jpgScreen Shot 2018-06-24 at 12.26.10 PM by dwainross34, on Flickr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's tough to draw much in the way of conclusions when the changes are less than the margin of error.  But it wouldn't surprise me too much if true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

So to grow Cleveland, you have to grow the black community.

 

Or grow other portions of the population faster than the black community can leave it. *shrug*

 

It is true that the African American population has declined faster than any other group. Using that data going back to 2010, it has declined by 9.3% or about 20,000 people. Now, if they've moved to suburbs to escape some of the more crushingly depressed areas of the east side, this is not so bad for those people, just bad for Cleveland. Indeed, if my calculations are correct, the suburban black population of Cuyahoga County grew by about 12,000, or 7.7%.  If you're into random numbers, if the trend continued into 2017, the Black/AA population will have dipped below majority (50%) status.

 

The white population, while in the 2 years shown above, saw an increase, has declined 6.5% (9,209) since 2010, from 34.9% to 34.3%.

 

The growing populations are Asians, which grew 14.3% from 2010 to 2016 and in 2016 hit the 2% mark, and Latinos, which grew 12.6%, adding 4,711 between 2010 and 2016.

 

Also of note, people reporting as 2 or more races have more than doubled since 2010.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

So to grow Cleveland, you have to grow the black community.

 

Or grow other portions of the population faster than the black community can leave it. *shrug*

 

It is true that the African American population has declined faster than any other group. Using that data going back to 2010, it has declined by 9.3% or about 20,000 people. Now, if they've moved to suburbs to escape some of the more crushingly depressed areas of the east side, this is not so bad for those people, just bad for Cleveland. If you're into random numbers, if the trend continued into 2017, the Black/AA population will have dipped below majority (50%) status.

 

The white population, while in the 2 years shown above, saw an increase, has declined 6.5% (9,209) since 2010, from 34.9% to 34.3%.

 

The growing populations are Asians, which grew 14.3% from 2010 to 2016 and in 2016 hit the 2% mark, and Latinos, which grew 12.6%, adding 4,711 between 2010 and 2016.

 

Also of note, people reporting as 2 or more races have more than doubled since 2010.

 

But since black population is the largest group.  You have to at least stabilize the number number of black residents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be helpful. Coincidentally, the black decline of 20,001 since 2010 almost exactly equals the overall decline (20,056). But it illustrates the point, even a stabilization of the African American population wouldn't have resulted in growth over that period.

 

I edited the post to add that the black suburban population has actually grown by a substantial amount, however that growth, along with gains in every other racial category in terms of raw population, has not managed to replace the exiting white suburban population as they leave the county. The pattern is largely the same - the majority race is moving away from the center, that exodus cannot be replaced by the (mostly) growing minority.  Even among Asians and Latinos, which are the city's biggest gainers, their numbers are growing faster in suburban Cuyahoga than in Cleveland proper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Census released demographic estimates for counties and metros yesterday.  I looked at the numbers for the 3-Cs.

 

 

Thanks for putting this together, jonoh81[/member]. I find this demographic information to be endlessly interesting.

 

Couple of points that jumped out at me:

 

- Columbus is simply killing it right now. I really don't know why, but the region is definitely experiencing a boom. It's growth among all races is very impressive.

 

- I didn't know Cincinnati was so much whiter than Cleveland or Columbus. The part of the region I grew up in was pretty diverse, so I guess I never realized this, but I suppose there are whole parts of the metro (NKY, far east and far west sides) that are just about as white as it gets.

 

- I was surprised to see Cincinnati had more Asians than Cleveland, even though Hamilton County had far fewer than Cuyahoga. This speaks to the large Asian population in Warren County. I'm sure there is a decent amount in Butler County, too. The heart of the Asian community in metro Cincinnati is in the northern suburban counties and the northern portions of Hamilton County.

 

So it seems that the bulk of Cleveland's population decline comes from the Black/African American population. The population dropped by around 4,000 from 2015 to 2016 while virtually every other group grew. Seeing how the east side is predominately black and also is in TERRIBLE shape, which in turn has led to massive flight, this isn't surprising. Stabilize the Black population and I feel we will see Cleveland's population stabilize as well.

 

I don't really understand this. According to the info jonoh81[/member] provided, Metro Cleveland lost over 51,000 (!) whites and 3,000 blacks between 2010 and 2017. It grew in Hispanics and Asians.

* I now see you were referring to Cleveland city not metro. Still, the losses at the regional level are a bit alarming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://cin.ci/2zdgkZc

 

“Cleveland-Elyria, Toledo and the Youngstown area the three Ohio regions that are among the places that have had the largest net decline in population as a result of migration between 2010 and 2017, according to a 24/7 Wall Street review of population figures from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Estimates Program.“

 

What’s going on in Cleveland?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

change in economy from heavy manufacturing to service based. The manufacturing jobs that are around rely on less people. People move because they are seeking the jobs and the industries that grew Ohio do not provide the level of jobs that they once did.

 

It is not that the other regions are doing anything right. Florida took advantage of a tourism economy that grew because of the prosperity of the North. People came for the jobs. Silicon Valley developed around tech and people came for the jobs. The jobs in Cleveland, even the biotech sector are not creating the volume of jobs to supplant all the factor workers who were once employed in the factories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

change in economy from heavy manufacturing to service based. The manufacturing jobs that are around rely on less people. People move because they are seeking the jobs and the industries that grew Ohio do not provide the level of jobs that they once did.

 

It is not that the other regions are doing anything right. Florida took advantage of a tourism economy that grew because of the prosperity of the North. People came for the jobs. Silicon Valley developed around tech and people came for the jobs. The jobs in Cleveland, even the biotech sector are not creating the volume of jobs to supplant all the factor workers who were once employed in the factories.

 

 

I'll add that college grads from OU, Kent, Akron, and BGSU who used to end up in Cleveland in large numbers are increasingly ending up in Columbus. There are more jobs that college grads are looking for there, the weather is better, and it's perceived as being a more hip city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

change in economy from heavy manufacturing to service based. The manufacturing jobs that are around rely on less people. People move because they are seeking the jobs and the industries that grew Ohio do not provide the level of jobs that they once did.

 

It is not that the other regions are doing anything right. Florida took advantage of a tourism economy that grew because of the prosperity of the North. People came for the jobs. Silicon Valley developed around tech and people came for the jobs. The jobs in Cleveland, even the biotech sector are not creating the volume of jobs to supplant all the factor workers who were once employed in the factories.

 

 

I'll add that college grads from OU, Kent, Akron, and BGSU who used to end up in Cleveland in large numbers are increasingly ending up in Columbus. There are more jobs that college grads are looking for there, the weather is better, and it's perceived as being a more hip city.

 

Add Miami to this list. In my experience, at least in the finance and business world, Columbus companies recruit Miami just as hard as they recruit OSU and OU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t get Columbus...the central business district is for the most part dead, with many vacant lots.

 

The short north neighborhood is great, but everything around that general area feels catered to osu students.

 

Columbus definitely gave me the feeling of a college town that has transitioned into a college city of sorts. Columbus is great I’ll admit and has a unique vibe (thanks in part to the osu student body)...but there is something that makes you feel “old” and, “out of place” when walking around the streets of Columbus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

change in economy from heavy manufacturing to service based. The manufacturing jobs that are around rely on less people. People move because they are seeking the jobs and the industries that grew Ohio do not provide the level of jobs that they once did.

 

It is not that the other regions are doing anything right. Florida took advantage of a tourism economy that grew because of the prosperity of the North. People came for the jobs. Silicon Valley developed around tech and people came for the jobs. The jobs in Cleveland, even the biotech sector are not creating the volume of jobs to supplant all the factor workers who were once employed in the factories.

 

Its stunning how many eds and meds jobs are being created in Cleveland. And even more stunning how it's not able to overcome the loss in manufacturing, transportation and even public sector jobs. Yet there are thousands of warehouse and manufacturing jobs available in the suburbs, but they are too far away and not accessible by public transportation that low-income people in/near the urban core can't reach them or they lack the skills/training to obtain them. Finally, the saddest part of this story is that few decision-makers, be they in the public or private sector, in the region are aware of this or doing anything to address it.


"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities."-Voltaire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t get Columbus...the central business district is for the most part dead, with many vacant lots.

 

The short north neighborhood is great, but everything around that general area feels catered to osu students.

 

Columbus definitely gave me the feeling of a college town that has transitioned into a college city of sorts. Columbus is great I’ll admit and has a unique vibe (thanks in part to the osu student body)...but there is something that makes you feel “old” and, “out of place” when walking around the streets of Columbus.

 

Based on this comment, it sounds like the last time you visited Columbus was at least 10 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cleveland is pursuing innovative technologies. The Lake Erie windfarm is 18 years in the making. It will employ hundreds and have 168 million in economic impact. Although, Columbus politicians have decided to stall the project for years. They recently approved it, but not without strings of ridiculous regulations. Columbus pursued driverless technology and received the full support from the state. Why didn’t ODOT stall that project for years. I mean autonomous vehicles have a much greater potential to harm humans. Nevertheless, like the Columbus politicians said, it has something to do with our “culture”. Northeast Ohio just doesn’t want to evolve from the old manufacturing roots. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t get Columbus...the central business district is for the most part dead, with many vacant lots.

 

The short north neighborhood is great, but everything around that general area feels catered to osu students.

 

Columbus definitely gave me the feeling of a college town that has transitioned into a college city of sorts. Columbus is great I’ll admit and has a unique vibe (thanks in part to the osu student body)...but there is something that makes you feel “old” and, “out of place” when walking around the streets of Columbus.

 

Based on this comment, it sounds like the last time you visited Columbus was at least 10 years ago.

 

I was there for the first time last Saturday. I think Columbus was fun, since I’m still in that age range of being a college student...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t get Columbus...the central business district is for the most part dead, with many vacant lots.

 

The short north neighborhood is great, but everything around that general area feels catered to osu students.

 

Columbus definitely gave me the feeling of a college town that has transitioned into a college city of sorts. Columbus is great I’ll admit and has a unique vibe (thanks in part to the osu student body)...but there is something that makes you feel “old” and, “out of place” when walking around the streets of Columbus.

 

I think the youthful vibrancy you're talking about is one of Columbus' most attractive characteristics to a lot of people that move there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m sorry. I’m just sharing my opinion. I spent the entire day in Columbus, and checked out as many, “must see” areas as I could with my friends.

 

I love the young vibe that Columbus has. But it seems that energy is extremely concentrated in the short north area/campus district area. When you travel farther away from that area the rest of downtown Columbus seems quiet dead in comparison.

 

In cincy, it sort of reminded me of Clifton gas light district/Northside and a smidge of otr on steroids. Great atmosphere. But very concentrated and felt very catered for osu student population.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add that college grads from OU, Kent, Akron, and BGSU who used to end up in Cleveland in large numbers are increasingly ending up in Columbus. There are more jobs that college grads are looking for there, the weather is better, and it's perceived as being a more hip city.

 

There are some "hip" advancements in agriculture and state-level government operations, I guess. I'll agree that Columbus has had more job growth than Cleveland in recent years, but I've never heard of Columbus, OH being perceived by anyone as a 'hip' city, especially when compared to Cleveland. If I had to rank the 3C's--it would be CLE, Cinci, Columbus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walking up and down short north you will see this hip vibe. Musicians on the street, a lot of pedestrians of different back grounds and diversity. Food trucks on a lot of blocks, a lot of eclectic shops/dive bars, a lot of late night food options (loved cluck a doodle do by the udf convience store).

 

My car got towed on short north and didn’t end up leaving till 6am because I had difficulties finding a working arm. But even super late at night I noticed there were still crowds on the street, musicians playing street music, food trucks bustling...and all of this was like at 4 am.

 

Funny enough some of the areas of short north did look a little sketchy (mainly because of the vacant grassy lot and some of then older buildings looked in bad shape)...and the main guy who was at shamrock towing was saying to our group how worried for us when we left and how he keeps a revolver by his side at all times because of the crime. He said there were 9 gun shots across the street.

 

I didn’t really get any high crime vibe. The area felt less sketchy than OTR for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...