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Columbus: Short North Developments and News

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this is on high next door to the old u-shaped greystone apt building no?

 

yay ground floor retail -- looks very nice! esp when compared to that old sofa express eyesore -- i take cheap couches and futons are out of style around there now? hehe!

 

 

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^Correct.

 

And WOW at that!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Progress report:

 

Developers begin work on Short North condominiums

 

Several longtime Short North developers have begun work on an ambitious condominium project near the heart of the Columbus arts district.  The five-story building called Dakota will offer 48 residential units and a handful of firstfloor commercial condos.  It’s going up at 845 N. High St., where two buildings that had been boarded up for years have been torn down.  One used to house a Sofa Express store.

 

The developers, known as Arms Properties, are Rajesh Lahoti, Raymond Brown, Michael Council and Wilbur Ischie.  Brown and Lahoti own Union Station Video Cafe, the Havana bar and Axis Nightclub in the neighborhood.  Arms Properties recently developed a handful of condominium projects in the Short North, including one at 775 N. High Street.  Lahoti said the goal for Dakota is to have two restaurants and two retail stores on the first floor.

 

More information is available at www.dakotaonhigh.com.

 

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Sounds like this one will be priced at or above Arena District rates!  I'm really impressed that they are already selling some.

 

$200,000 / 750 sq. ft. = $267/sq. ft.

 

$900,000 / 3250 sq. ft. = $277/sq. ft.

 

WOW!

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Arch-lights settlement suits city fine

$1.2 million from designer nearly would cover cost to fix Short North fixtures

Saturday, December 10, 2005

Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

The company that designed the shorted-out lights on the Short North arches over High Street will pay the city $1.2 million to settle a lawsuit — and almost cover the cost of fixing them next year.  The city originally paid $800,000 for the decorative lights, which haven’t worked since they flickered out in 2002.  It will cost an estimated $1.3 million to fix them.

 

"It’s almost a complete recovery," said Assistant City Attorney Pat Delaney. "That’s a good result for any type of litigation."  The Columbus City Council will vote Monday on the settlement with EG&G, based in Akron.  The city sued EG&G in January 2004 after negotiations broke down.  The fiber-optic lighting system in the 17 arches failed shortly after it was first lighted on Dec. 4, 2002.

 

The city paid $2.4 million toward the $3 million project, which included the cost of the metal arches themselves.  The Short North Special Improvement District financed the rest.  The city paid about $800,000 for the lights, Delaney said.

 

More at http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2005/12/10/20051210-B1-00.html

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the electronics were not protected from the enviroment from what I heard.  There was standing water submerging the controls.

 

That is what the owner of Mac's told me

 

I never really liked them, but it is a shame that they never had the chance to win me over.

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I guess they are just decorative, not for providing street lighting and such.  LEDs are really gaining use in all kinds of uses because the "bulbs" have such long life and are so durable.  I think we will be seeing more of this kind of lighting on buildings as the prices get more affordable.

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the electronics were not protected from the enviroment from what I heard.  There was standing water submerging the controls.

 

That is what the owner of Mac's told me

 

I never really liked them, but it is a shame that they never had the chance to win me over.

 

Someone e-mailed me with a similar answer back in the begining of this year.  I posted it somewhere on the board.

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I love this:

 

Grossmann said the technology his company used in the arches was new at the time.

 

"In life, you learn from every experience," he said.

 

Yeah, uh, whoops. Yeesh. I can't wait until the lights are on....they'll add so much to gallery hop.

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Just what are we talking about here?

 

Do those incandescent looking bulbs have fiber optics in them, or are the fiber optics what is to light the Short North lettering:

ShortNorth3.JPG

 

These are historical right, as in there used to be arches years ago? I like them alot, except they make me think of Pennsylvania.

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Just what are we talking about here?

 

Do those incandescent looking bulbs have fiber optics in them, or are the fiber optics what is to light the Short North lettering:

 

I believe so.  I've seen them try to work on occasion.  They change colors, but they flicker and only get about 1/4 of the "bulbs" lit.

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Just what are we talking about here?

 

Do those incandescent looking bulbs have fiber optics in them, or are the fiber optics what is to light the Short North lettering:

 

These are historical right, as in there used to be arches years ago? I like them alot, except they make me think of Pennsylvania.

 

1)  These are not the arches of old, they are new arches meant to be reminiscent of the old arches. 

 

2)  The fiber optics are in the incandescent looking bulbs.

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To my understanding, there was a big light in one of the posts of the arches and fiber optics were used to light the bulbs.  Water would collect in the posts and short the system out. 

 

At the turn of the 20th Century, Columbus was known as Arch City (this was long before the Arch of St. Louis was even concieved) because arches like those now in the Short North District once ligned the entire downtown stretch of High Street.  I forget exactly why they were moved, but I think it may have had to do something with the Trolly System they once had. 

 

I am really looking forward to the new LED lights because of the flickering that they are able to do.  If anyone has ever been to Paris and seen Le Tour Eiffel at night, you know what I mean.  Hopefully the same thing will happen on High Street, that would be awesome.  Although, it would create quite a distraction for drivers. 

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More condos set for Short North

Business First of Columbus - April 21, 2006

By Brian R. Ball, Business First

 

JBH Holdings LLC has tentative plans to build 37 condos at North High Street and West 4th Avenue, next to Skully's bar and diner. JBH's Jackson on High project, now before the Victorian Village Commission for approval, is contingent on the expected April 19 acquisition of a vacant building at 1127 N. High St. and an adjacent parking lot for $1.6 million.

 

Lakota Investment Co. had planned to build an 18-unit project dubbed Fusion Lofts on the property.  Brad Howe, a former banker leading the $11 million project, said a two-level parking garage will offer about 80 parking slots for condo owners and neighboring property owners.  "The weakness in the Short North is parking," Howe said. "The Jackson on High's garage gives us a competitive advantage."

 

"It's really a dynamic-looking building; it's not like anything we've had in the Short North," he said. "So it introduces new architectural element I think will improve the district."

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2006/04/24/story1.html

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This project has started. I took this on Monday. Since then they have demolished the white building in the background and the sign is down too. You can see the south corner on Jeffrey Place on the far left.

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Arches due to be up and running November 25th-December 2nd (I'm thinking the 2nd since that is Holiday Hop).

 

And speaking of 17 dark arches spanning Columbus’ most vital corridor...

Though I’ve never had the experience of seeing our High Street icons aglow, I can imagine the unifying impact they will have once lit. Indeed, they will become THE signature of the Short North. Hopefully, it won’t be relegated to my imagination all that much longer. City officials have informed me that we’re on track to flip the switches by December 2, perhaps as early as November 25. What a great kickoff to the downtown holiday season. We flip the switch on all lights (sidewalk trees, building outlines, and yes the arches) in a spectacular light-up of downtown Columbus. Bands. Choirs. Carriage rides. We collaborate with downtown, the Arena District and the Gateway for simultaneous light-ups. We draw 10,000 visitors to help celebrate. The next week we have Holiday Hop. The next year we add a parade from the Gateway, right down High Street to the center of the capitol. All right, I’m getting carried away, but can’t you see it!? Though nothing is in stone, we’re gradually shifting from incredulity to optimism. Stay tuned for more details.

 

http://www.shortnorth.com/JohnAngeloJun2006.html

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Here's hoping this time it happens...those arches have stayed dark for far too long.

 

Oh, and I do like the light-up idea for the High St. corridor. Give Easton some competition... :whip:

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High Street hopes for growing retail crowd

Business First of Columbus - July 7, 2006

by Kathy Showalter Business First

 

For 20 years, dozens of art galleries have designated the mile-long stretch of High Street north of downtown as Columbus' arts district, but apparel and home decor merchants are gentrifying the strip and expanding its commercial appeal among consumers.  The newest shops, which are opening ahead of condominium construction in the area, are filling prime retail spaces in the Short North's midsection, pushing development closer to the Ohio State University South Campus Gateway project and improving even more High Street city blocks - some that were seedy not too long ago.

 

An open question for Short North residents and backers is how much of the recent development can be attributed to the Cap at Union Station, an $8 million retail bridge spanning Interstate 670. The Cap, which was developed by Columbus-based Continental Real Estate Cos., will celebrate its second year in September and was seen as repairing what many considered a scar that separated Short North from the convention center and downtown.  Michael Wilkos, vice president of the Downtown Residents Association of Columbus, acknowledged he sees more people walking from downtown into Short North than he did two years ago.  "Downtown and the Short North are once again seamless," he said.  "The sidewalk space on the Cap is one of the best public spaces in the city for people-watching and enjoying all that urban life has to offer."

 

Read more at http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2006/07/10/story4.html

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From the 7/22/06 Dispatch:

 

GRAPHIC: Adding up costs

 

Arch lights could work by holidays, officials say

City must earmark thousands more for Short North fixtures

Saturday, July 22, 2006

 

The Short North arches won’t be dark any longer, come December.  That is if Columbus agrees to pay another $33,550.96.  It’s a pittance, considering the nearly $1.8 million taxpayers have invested so far, Councilwoman Maryellen O’Shaughnessy said.  Changing the lights in the arches will mean they will finally work — four years after they were erected.

 

The Columbus City Council is expected to vote on the funding Monday, bringing the total projected taxpayer cost of the 17 arches to about $108,000 apiece.  "It has taken time, and, of course, construction costs have gone up," O’Shaughnessy said.  The lights began malfunctioning almost as soon as they were first lighted, in December 2002.  The city sued the designer, EG&G, of Akron, and had the lights redesigned elsewhere.

 

More at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/07/22/20060722-B3-03.html

 

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Price tag balloons to fix Short North arches

By Dean Narciso

The Columbus Dispatch

Tuesday, October 3, 2006 12:16 AM

 

The circuitous journey toward electrifying the Short North arches has taken another jolt.  Inflation, particularly in the cost of copper wiring, is responsible for $277,595 in overruns that Short North businesses and the city of Columbus must pay to get the lights back on.

 

Many thought that the $1.2 million legal settlement in December between Columbus and EG&G, the Akron-based designer of the arches, would finally bring light after four years of darkness to the 17 arches that span N. High Street.  Trenches are now being dug to lay wire for the final work on the arches.  The lights are expected to be operating sometime next June, Webster said.

 

More at http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=216652

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Had to laugh.

Tom Barlow, owner of bloggingOhio, e-mailed this morning asking permission to use a photo I took of the arches in their non-working state, in reference to one of his blog entries.

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