Jump to content
Guest CMH_Downtown

Columbus: RiverSouth Developments and News

Recommended Posts

13 minutes ago, Tiger57 said:

"He also said that the company believes that the initial 311 complaint was made by a disgruntled former employee." - Ha!

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/more-discrepancies-found-between-finished-buildings-and-approved-plans-bw1

While it's not great that the city had no idea that the building didn't match the approved designs, it's good to see that they actually launched an investigation due to the 311 complaint.  Maybe they will pay more attention going forward.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Tiger57 said:

"He also said that the company believes that the initial 311 complaint was made by a disgruntled former employee." - Ha!

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/more-discrepancies-found-between-finished-buildings-and-approved-plans-bw1

 

I do not believe for a second that LC did not know what they were doing and they were nothing more than "innocent mistakes". As stated in the article, these issues are present on the newest three of their downtown builds... this is a result of value engineering at its finest. I do appreciate that LC is taking *some* action to correct the issues, but its minimal at best. I would love the city to hold more developers accountable, maybe with loss of tax abatements or incentives if not built to spec. While the issue is not rampant, developers take notice of these things and the situation could snowball quickly.

 

Additionally, I still hate and will forever trash talk Crawford Hoying and their projects for the Cherry Street bait and switch. If you're reading this, you cheap a** principals at Crawford Hoying.... just know, I HATE THEE. Thats all.

 

Edited by DevolsDance
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, DevolsDance said:

 

I do not believe for a second that LC did not know what they were doing and they were nothing more than "innocent mistakes". As stated in the article, these issues are present on the newest three of their downtown builds... this is a result of value engineering at its finest. I do appreciate that LC is taking *some* action to correct the issues, but its minimal at best. I would love the city to hold more developers accountable, maybe with loss of tax abatements or incentives if not built to spec. While the issue is not rampant, developers take notice of these things and the situation could snowball quickly.

 

Additionally, I still hate and will forever trash talk Crawford Hoying and their projects for the Cherry Street bait and switch. If you're reading this, you cheap a** principals at Crawford Hoying.... just know, I HATE THEE. Thats all.

 

 

Yeah, LC definitely was definitely hoping no one would notice.  You don't do it on 3 separate buildings and act like it wasn't intentional.  

CF isn't a big fan of mine after I trashed the Cherry Street development.  I think all these issues are related to developers not being held accountable by the Downtown Commission.  You're not seeing these same circumstances in other areas of the city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand how they don't have someone drive around and compare completed developments to the approved renderings. It can't be that hard, don't these people work or at least meet downtown. There should be a strict policy on if you don't build what is approved then you automatically lose any tax abatements or TIFS and if you don't bring the building back in spec then you are fined. This is nonsense. I couldn't pay 50% of my state taxes then blame it on a new accountant. The fact that there's any negotiation is nonsense. If the city approved a certain design you don't get to avoid it and then try to spray paint some sh*tty mural as mitigation.  

 

To whoever submitted the 311 claim, you sir, are a hero. I'll try to pay more attention to these things myself moving forward so that I can follow in your footsteps. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DGX Debuts Downtown

 

DGX-14-620x382.jpg

 

Columbus’ first DGX store has officially opened its doors Downtown, offering a mix between a traditional grocery store and a convenience store.

 

Occupying 6,200 square feet of space at 166 S. High St. at the Highpoint on Columbus Commons, the store is a growing brand under the Dollar General umbrella. With grab-and-go food items, fresh produce, a coffee station and more, the concept is aimed at urban shoppers.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/dgx-debuts-downtown-sp1

  • Like 2

"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is fantastic. Other than the rather surprising location, a much needed asset. I wonder if this will drive the downtown CVS to up their game or even go with the A Store Model with fresh ready to go foods, sushi, etc etc. 

 

That's one thing I've always thought about Millenial is how perfect it would be for the urban CVS or Walgreens (as an alternative to the standard suggestions of a Target or Trader Joe's) seen in other cities. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, DTCL11 said:

That's one thing I've always thought about Millenial is how perfect it would be for the urban CVS or Walgreens (as an alternative to the standard suggestions of a Target or Trader Joe's) seen in other cities. 


I’m thinking a new urban Kroger (like the one they just built in Cincy next to the HQ) would be really nice. Unfortunately, they probably won’t want to do that given that they have the Brewery District location. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to check out this place today! I didn't know it was open yet. I work very close to here so I'll walk over during my lunch break. Excited to check it out. And honestly, it might be my new go-to place to pick up some things on my way home from work before I catch the bus, depending on what they have. 

Edited by Zyrokai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, cbussoccer said:


I’m thinking a new urban Kroger (like the one they just built in Cincy next to the HQ) would be really nice. Unfortunately, they probably won’t want to do that given that they have the Brewery District location. 

If not Kroger, which I would prefer because I still have brand/state loyalty deep down, but perhaps one of the modified yet smaller 2 story models of Giant Eagle like the one they put in on Main St. in Bexley.  As the population grows in this area of town, I think that could be an awesome option perhaps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can literally not see Columbus getting a downtown Whole Foods. At least not for another 10 years or more.

Edited by Zyrokai
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Pablo said:

^I read somewhere that Columbus is the largest city without a downtown Whole Foods. Indy has a nice one.

 

Downtown Indy has a population approaching 30,000. Columbus is still sitting around half that. Another factor that helped them is they only had one in Indy prior in the affluent far north suburbs. Putting one downtown draws from a large portion of the city for Indy. 

 

I would agree with zyrokai that it will be a long time until Columbus sees a whole foods Downtown with already having 3, including one well inside the outer belt, a downtown whole foods is not going to draw as much. 

 

Population is the number one thing holding downtown back. Bringing up to 1000 units online each year is not going to bring a population boom downtown needs to get some amenities other cities have anytime soon. Columbus doesn't benefit from having started with 20k+ residents in old housing stock downtown in the 90s. There isn't a ton of room for population growth without a massive expansion and if we want to hit the 30k point generally seen as a tipping point anytime soon, we are going to need to see 2-3k units brought online annually. Otherwise, columbus will continue the steady climb and just have to be patient. But in all reality, the lack of historical housing stock as a base for the resurgence of downtown has been the biggest factor in Lower population numbers despite faster growth. 

Edited by DTCL11
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, DTCL11 said:

 

Downtown Indy has a population approaching 30,000. Columbus is still sitting around half that. Another factor that helped them is they only had one in Indy prior in the affluent far north suburbs. Putting one downtown draws from a large portion of the city for Indy. 

 

I would agree with zyrokai that it will be a long time until Columbus sees a whole foods Downtown with already having 3, including one well inside the outer belt, a downtown whole foods is not going to draw as much. 

 

Population is the number one thing holding downtown back. Bringing up to 1000 units online each year is not going to bring a population boom downtown needs to get some amenities other cities have anytime soon. Columbus doesn't benefit from having started with 20k+ residents in old housing stock downtown in the 90s. There isn't a ton of room for population growth without a massive expansion and if we want to hit the 30k point generally seen as a tipping point anytime soon, we are going to need to see 2-3k units brought online annually. Otherwise, columbus will continue the steady climb and just have to be patient. But in all reality, the lack of historical housing stock as a base for the resurgence of downtown has been the biggest factor in Lower population numbers despite faster growth. 

 

My argument would be to look at the populations of SN/VV/HW, German Village, OTE & now Franklinton.  Add those in with downtown because technically SN is our "Midtown" and we have a population that far exceeds the 30k mark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Columbus and Indy are a bit different because Columbus has highly and densely populated neighborhoods with relatively high incomes just North and South of downtown in a way that Indy does not. We would be much more likely to see an urban Whole Foods or Giant Eagle or Kroger or something similar in a future development on one of the last remaining lots in the Short North or in a redevelopment of the old Giant Eagle site on Neil than we seeing one go in downtown. 

 

Our downtown area is just in an awkward point in its growth where the population is starting to become significant, but it still needs a major bump before one of these urban grocery stores will make the jump. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, wpcc88 said:

 

My argument would be to look at the populations of SN/VV/HW, German Village, OTE & now Franklinton.  Add those in with downtown because technically SN is our "Midtown" and we have a population that far exceeds the 30k mark.

 

We might look at it that way but generally, corporations probably won't. And while the surrounding neighborhoods have the population and growing, counting on them to support a downtown amenity would also require building the parking infrastructure to support the commute. Goodness knows they could not count on Columbus transit to reduce parking if they are aiming for most if the business coming elsewhere. And while the 'core' might hit that mark, until downtown hits that mark on it's own, downtown won't feel hustling and bustling and probably won't for some time. And if downtown wants to have truly more urban amenities, corporations probably aren't going to be sold on the surrounding area idea, especially with grocery stores as moderately abundant as they are.  I'd be happy to pitch it to a company but also not surprised if they don't bite with the surrounding area argument until downtown hits it's own population target and can stand alone for support. Same reason campus has an urban target before anywhere else in the city. I agree with cbussoccer that such an amenity is likely to go to a denser spot before downtown right now with as relatively sparse downtown is for the time being. 

 

Then there is the flip side that what happens if one can be convinced, will that jump start more downtown development? It's a chicken and the egg scenario and I'm not sure the grocer is willing to play it. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, DTCL11 said:

 

 

Then there is the flip side that what happens if one can be convinced, will that jump start more downtown development? It's a chicken and the egg scenario and I'm not sure the grocer is willing to play it. 

 

With them being tied into Amazon I wouldn’t be surprised if they did take that risk. The Indy one is essentially in their Short North, but not necessarily centrally located to ALL of their downtown population. And their transportation is no better than Columbus’. I think it would be smart to be built in the RiverSouth area because you would attract GV, OTE or even Bexley. Short North would still have the option of there or UA.

 

To get somewhat back on topic I love the idea of this DGX. I had read somewhere that some cities were banning Dollar Generals and the like from urban areas and food deserts. Love that they have these as an option.

Edited by wpcc88
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2020 at 2:24 PM, wpcc88 said:

 

With them being tied into Amazon I wouldn’t be surprised if they did take that risk. The Indy one is essentially in their Short North, but not necessarily centrally located to ALL of their downtown population. And their transportation is no better than Columbus’. I think it would be smart to be built in the RiverSouth area because you would attract GV, OTE or even Bexley. Short North would still have the option of there or UA.

 

To get somewhat back on topic I love the idea of this DGX. I had read somewhere that some cities were banning Dollar Generals and the like from urban areas and food deserts. Love that they have these as an option.

 

I'm sure all retailers are watching the DT DGX very closely.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The DGX is amazing. It's like so cheap and convenient, lol.

 

DGX was busy the 2 out of 3 times I've been in there, lol. I think CVS slowed down a lot because of it. I needed one thing from CVS that DGX didn't sell and CVS is usually busy but it wasn't when I went.

 

All anecdotal, of course. 

 

I also strongly believe that this will be the last grocery store for a very long time to go in downtown.

 

 

Edited by Zyrokai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There needs to be no or very little loss of business at the CVS for other retailers to say the DGX was a success. Otherwise it's a zero-sum game that no other retailers want to play.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...