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Greater Cincinnati Metro (SORTA) and TANK News & Discussion

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3 hours ago, Robuu said:

 

That is mostly true in the United States, but not so true in the rest of the world. There needs to be some standardization of the term, but I don't know how that's achievable.

 

It's because there's no such thing as actual BRT activists in this country, only rail opponents.

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13 hours ago, jmecklenborg said:

 

There is no term RRT for "railroad rapid transit".  The term BRT is salesman-speak for moderately improved bus service and too often an ugly streetscape. 

 

The much-vaunted Boston Silverline BRT from Logan Airport takes 20+ minutes to travel 2 miles, despite hitting 55mph for one of those two miles in the Ted Williams Tunnel.  Really

 

So is BRT that once had timed signals but doesn't anymore thanks to rich people complaining about red lights still BRT?  Is BRT that was designed back in 1995 to go straight from the Ted Williams Tunnel into a dedicated tunnel to South Station still BRT when conflicting interests force it to surface and do a crazy 10-minute double-back in the South Waterfront?  Is BRT still BRT when it gets into a traffic jam in the Ted Williams Tunnel caused by a traffic problem in East Boston? 

 

1 hour ago, DEPACincy said:

 

It takes 17 minutes to get from Logan to South Station on the Silver Line. I've done it many times and the timing has been consistent. I've never run into a problem. The crazy loop is weird but it beats the hell out of an Uber or taxi. 

 

 

I’m with Jake on this one. His post of the Silver Line gave my flashbacks of how miserable that connection was. I lived just off the Red Line and therefore connected to the Silver Line to get to the airport regularly once it opened. What we needed was a direct, fast connection from South Station to the airport.  The silver line does not provide that.  The route through Seaport should have been a separate line, period. 

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42 minutes ago, ryanlammi said:

Population density would probably be a more valuable data point

Agreed, anyone have that info? If so I'll add it. 

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1 hour ago, DEPACincy said:

This quibbling over what is and what isn't BRT is dumb. Most people have never heard the term. What SORTA is proposing is vastly improved public transit for the region.

 

Then Metro should educate the public about what BRT actually is and/or not lie and tell the public that we're getting 4 BRT routes when what we're actually going to get is 4 Metro Plus-style limited stop bus routes that come nowhere close to "true" BRT or even Metro's own watered-down definition of BRT.

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37 minutes ago, jmecklenborg said:

 

The old routes are still visible on the signs.  The #17, #18, and #19 were duplicative all the way from Knowlton's Corner to Downtown.  This meant there was a bus passing in front of McMicken Hall every 5-10 minutes pretty much all the time.  After the cuts, the #18 was eliminated completely (which, incidentally was my neighborhood's bus growing up) and the #19 was rerouted from Clifton Ave. to Mt. Auburn via Jefferson Ave.  Outbound, you were able to wait for a bus on Clifton Ave. that would take you up Hamilton Ave., up Colerain, or shift on North Bend and then up Cheviot Rd. to White Oak.  That was just one corner of the bus system. 

 

I loved the frequency of the #17/#18/#19! 

 

I thought the #18 was being merged into the #17 which would have made the #17 more frequent, but that never seemed to happen.

 

I was never a fan that the #19 had to take over part of the #39 which was eliminated.


“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche

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19 minutes ago, taestell said:

 

Then Metro should educate the public about what BRT actually is and/or not lie and tell the public that we're getting 4 BRT routes when what we're actually going to get is 4 Metro Plus-style limited stop bus routes that come nowhere close to "true" BRT or even Metro's own watered-down definition of BRT.

 

We are getting what they put up on their site. I'm not sure what else they can do but give the actual definition that they are using? They only have so many resources to "educate" the public and they are holding several public information sessions, running TV and radio ads, etc. I feel like people have unrealistic expectations.

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51 minutes ago, GCrites80s said:

 

It's because there's no such thing as actual BRT activists in this country, only rail opponents.

 

Old Man Beaman in Nashville fought The Amp, which was the now-forgotten BRT line that was to have been built on West End Ave. near Vanderbilt and connected to 5-Points in East Nashville.  This was back in 2015 or 2016, before the much-bigger light rail & bus subway tunnel that was proposed under fun-loving Mayor Barry and went down in flames at the polls.   

 

Beaman owns like 15 car dealerships around Nashville, including the massive lots that are now worth well over $10 million between downtown and Vanderbilt.  It would be like if there was a giant Ford Dealership right in the middle of Short North, fronting High St.  

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38 minutes ago, Boomerang_Brian said:

 

 

I’m with Jake on this one. His post of the Silver Line gave my flashbacks of how miserable that connection was. I lived just off the Red Line and therefore connected to the Silver Line to get to the airport regularly once it opened. What we needed was a direct, fast connection from South Station to the airport.  The silver line does not provide that.  The route through Seaport should have been a separate line, period. 

 

The full history of the silver line is that it was compensation lobbed at Roxbury after the MBTA failed to fulfill its promise to restore rail service on Washington Ave. after the el was torn down around 1986.  The orange line trains now operate as a modern rapid transit line, albeit parallel to the Northeast Corridor tracks and along the path for a cancelled expressway.  As such, the new orange line's stations are in weird locations.  

 

So the Orange line, today, operates along the path of what could have been a busway.  And instead the Silver Line operates on Washington Ave., where a subway should be.  

 

The silver lining to the silver line is that its improvement to transit service in Roxbury was minimal, staving off gentrification.  

 

The silver line was sold as a one-seat ride to Logan, but the purpose-built tunnel at South Station still hasn't been completed, 20 years after the service began, so you still have to transfer.  

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, taestell said:

 

Then Metro should educate the public about what BRT actually is and/or not lie and tell the public that we're getting 4 BRT routes when what we're actually going to get is 4 Metro Plus-style limited stop bus routes that come nowhere close to "true" BRT or even Metro's own watered-down definition of BRT.

They don't say 4 BRT routes. They say 2 of the 4 will happen. It's including something like 20 miles of BRT which ends up being 2 routes. And then the rumor I heard was that the other two routes would indeed get Metro-Plus style routes. 

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Cranley has announced his candidacy for Ohio Governor in 2021.  

 

Now it's crystal-clear why Cranley waited until his second term to enact his long-planned transit tax shift.  If the thing in March passes, in 2012 he'll be able to claim that he significantly lowered Cincinnati's earnings tax.  No mention will be made of the see-saw action with the county sales tax.  Or the "infrastructure" slush fund created to entice the electorate.  

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Conservatives back countywide transportation tax

 

Two leading West Side conservatives said Friday they will back a 0.8% sales tax that will be used to expand bus service throughout Hamilton County and fix roads and bridges.

 

Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes, a Democrat, and Ohio House Majority Leader Bill Seitz, R-Green Township, endorsed the tax, which is on the March 17 ballot, at a news conference at Westwood Town Hall.

 

Rhodes’ support was particularly notable because he helped lead the opposition in 2002 to the last transit levy on a Hamilton County ballot, the MetroMoves measures, which would have expanded bus service and built several light rail lines.

 

“That was a boondoggle from the get go. It would have taken 10 years to get there,” Rhodes said in an interview with the Business Courier. “This is transportation, bus transportation. No streetcars are in it, thank God. It’s a device to get people to jobs, which is the major thing for me. Plus, the city earnings tax is going to be reduced."

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2020/02/14/conservatives-back-countywide-transportation-tax.html


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