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Columbus: Near East Side / King-Lincoln / Olde Towne East Developments

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Ehhh, as much as I'd like to see King-Lincoln restored to its former livelyhood, I don't know how well this building will serve as a catylist for the area. I'm with the one guy that was interviewed, renovation projects should be spearheaded by those active in the community. The police presence might provide a sense of safety, which will hopefully encourage more locals to invest and move back into the area, but hopefully that project will be the most we see out of large real estate corporations.

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this proposal has caused a little uproar here, as it seems it is not welcome in the neighborhood

 

Group sues to block sale of land for police offices

 

Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

 

 

A neighborhood group sued Columbus to prevent the city from selling land to a group that wants to build a new office building on the Near East Side.

 

The King-Lincoln Bronzeville Neighborhood Association wants a judge to stop the sale and force the city to hold more community meetings to discuss plans for the site.

 

The group wants a condominium complex with ground-level stores to be built on the half-acre site on the northeast corner of E. Long Street and Hamilton Avenue just east of Downtown.

 

But last month, the Columbus City Council voted to sell the lot to Gideon Development Partners LLC for $32,000. Gideon plans to build a $6.2 million building that is to house the Columbus police internal affairs and accident investigation units, a project Mayor Michael B. Coleman backs. The city signed a 15-year lease with Gideon to house the units. The annual cost will be $380,000.

 

The neighborhood group doesn?t want those police units in the neighborhood, said the group?s president, Willis Brown. He said more office space isn?t needed when vacancy rates Downtown are more than 20 percent. The group did not hire a lawyer to prepare the suit. Brown, who is not a lawyer, filed it on behalf of the group.

 

City Attorney Richard C. Pfeiffer Jr. said he hasn?t seen the suit, which was filed Wednesday. He said he didn?t think the suit would prevent the city from moving forward with the project.

 

mferenchik@dispatch.com

 

sue the city of columbus, thats a good one, you have to sign like 3 reams of paper if one of their trash trucks damages ur property, and then they will pay only hater you insurance pays. so good luck guys!, it wouldent be the same guy that speaks or at least was speaking at every meating about how the police abused him, those who match the meetingss know who im refering to

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Here are the models they're showing:

 

milesi8vu.jpg  milesii7eb.jpg  ellingtoni4kw.jpg 

              The Miles I                                The Miles II                                The Ellington I

                  $140K                                        $190K                                          $142K

 

                            ellingtonii5tq.jpg  coltrane8xd.jpg

                                     The Ellington II                         The Coltrane

                                               $190K                                      $200K

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Well, they're going to start the Salvation Army building:

 

 

Salvation Army building center on east side

Tony Goins, Business First

 

The Salvation Army of Greater Columbus plans to break ground Thursday on a 28,000-square-foot service and worship center on Columbus' east side.  The center, at 966 E. Main St., will offer youth programs, career assistance for adults and worship services, the Salvation Army said Tuesday. It will include a food pantry and clothing bank. It will be one of five service centers in the Columbus area.

 

It will replace a smaller center down the road at 1181 E. Main St., said spokesman Lou Venneri. The center is intended to act as a neighborhood anchor for the east side, Venneri said.  The $3.4 million project was funded by donations from individuals, corporations, foundations and city and county government.

 

 

Read more at http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2005/10/31/daily8.html?from_rss=1

 

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This commentary was in today's Dispatch, and puts an interesting spin on placing a global food outlet in a historic neighborhood. I'm still not too happy about putting this free-standing Wendy's in the neighborhood. If it would have been located on the ground level of multi-story building, I would definitely back it. I think it should have been built in a rehabbed building on E. Long St. in King-Lincoln.

 

New Wendy’s underscores divide along Broad Street

Thursday, February 16, 2006

MIKE HARDEN

 

On the day Eric Stevenson placed the "now hiring" sign in the window of his yet-to-be-completed Wendy’s on the Near East Side, 75 people called about jobs. Within five days, his list of potential employees had grown to 250. The neighborhood Stevenson picked for his Wendy’s has unemployment percentages in the double digits, he said.  "A third of the people within a mile of the restaurant don’t have a car. That’s from 2000 census figures. More than half of the households make less than $20,000 a year."

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/02/16/20060216-C3-00.html

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^ Yep!  You should have seen all of 'em at the 70/71 split meeting last night.  I thought Tom Slack of ODOT did a great job of "handling" them.  He was very polite and respectful in the midst of their "in your face" style of questioning.

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I don't know, I still have images of that McDonalds on Woodward Ave. in Detroit when I think of this project.

 

For those that don't know, Woodward in Detroit can be pretty easily compared to Broad in Columbus. There are several areas full of historic homes and new construction immediately outside of downtown. Along Woodward, where you find some incredible old homes, you also find a McDonalds, with golden chandeliers inside and fancy-ish draperies over the windows.

 

Man does it look cheesy.

 

While I understand the Wendy's being built here will give a glimmer of hope to the people in the neighborhood, I still do not agree with the location, no matter how much wrought-iron they put on it. Like I said, a much more suitable location, which I think would in turn promote more development in the area, would have been building it in a storefront along Long St. in King-Lincoln.

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This commentary was in today's Dispatch, and puts an interesting spin on placing a global food outlet in a historic neighborhood. I'm still not too happy about putting this free-standing Wendy's in the neighborhood. If it would have been located on the ground level of multi-story building, I would definitely back it.

 

Agreed. These aren't the suburbs we are talking about.

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I found this article I had passed by and I wondered if anybody knew anything about these:

 

 

New development sparks long road to revitalization

Business First of Columbus - March 3, 2006

by Scott Rawdon, Business First

 

More than 15 years ago, community activist Sarni Dickerson spearheaded an initiative to move six restored houses to a lot between Monroe and Talmadge avenues at Long Street to revitalize the Near East Side Long Street District.  "She had a wonderful plan," said attorney John Waddy, who wrote about the history of the neighborhood in "Who's Who in Black Columbus," but the plan "just didn't work out."

 

But the restored houses were in the middle of a blighted area and sat empty for years, he said, only to be condemned and demolished, because no one wanted to live there.  The lot, known as the Monroe Cluster, has been vacant ever since.  Now, the city of Columbus is ready to give it a try.  The Monroe Cluster sits within the city's King Lincoln District Redevelopment Project. The city purchased the lot for $38,000 and has chosen a developer to build 18 owner-occupied town homes and a proposed 18,000 square feet of commercial space at a price tag of $6 million.

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2006/03/06/focus4.html

 

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I heard about NoBo awhile ago and I'm glad to see some activity going on in this not-much-talked-about urban neighborhood. Also happy to see an effort made to consider the current residents of the area. I recall Coleman talking about a few plans for the area in...I think the state of the city address.

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Here's the speech by Mayor Coleman with the relevent part quoted.

 

"The story of progress in Columbus is also the story of our neighborhoods. Some of our most challenged neighborhoods are transforming before our eyes. Like in the King Lincoln District, which is a miracle in the making, a place that was once the center of culture, commerce, civics and church for the African American Community. A neighborhood where 68,000 people thrived in the 1940s, declined over the decades to a place where the average income left families in poverty, where only 25% owned homes and where the residential population withered to only 16,000 people. Now, new commercial buildings are replacing vacant lots-new apartments, condos and single family homes are taking the place of boarded up buildings. Where crime and crack were once common, hope is back and we are on track for a better future.

 

The historic Lincoln Theater, at one time the only theater where Black families could enjoy live entertainment in our city has been saved from neglect and will be totally rebuilt within the next two years. Seven major projects are currently underway: Gateway Building at Long and Hamilton, Lincoln Theater, Whitney Young Apartments, NOBO, Monroe Cluster, St. Paul AME Health Center, and Hamilton Park Condominiums. Together they mean more than $30 million in new investment in a neighborhood that had seen nothing but generations of neglect. Thank you to all of the neighborhood leaders who have helped drive this forward."

 

http://www.ppionline.org/ndol/ndol_ci.cfm?kaid=106&subid=122&contentid=253761

 

Has anyone checked out this area yet? Maybe there's something in the photo section...

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From the 6/11/06 Dispatch:

 

 

Mayor pushes for millions to fix up theater

Lincoln’s redevelopment key step in transforming district, Coleman says

Sunday, June 11, 2006

Mark Ferenchik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Columbus paid $1 million for the old Lincoln Theater and has made several abortive attempts to resurrect the Near East Side landmark. Now, Mayor Michael B. Coleman wants to spend $4 million more to fix it up. He’s also asking local companies and county and federal governments to come up with an additional $4 million to $6 million to help out.

 

"This is the anchor of an entire neighborhood transformation," Coleman said. "It has been neglected for too long. The cost of neglect is far greater than the cost of this investment." Officials said at least $8 million is needed to reopen the theater on E. Long Street just across I-71 from Downtown. The theater seats 550.

 

"When I look at what’s been put in COSI, the Lazarus building, this is chump change," said Larry James, chairman of the King-Lincoln District Redevelopment Corp. and one of those leading the drive for the money. But the push comes as the King-Lincoln community is divided over the Coleman administration’s plans for neighborhood redevelopment.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/06/11/20060611-C4-00.html

 

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Oops, already a thread on this: http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php?topic=1840.0

 

Brown blasts city on Long-Hamilton project

By GILBERT PRICE

 

A $6.2 million office building that is designed to help revitalize the near east side is being challenged by one of the groups the city said it is trying to help.  Willis Brown, president of the King-Lincoln Bronzeville Association, said that his group is vigorously opposing the plan to put an office building at the corner of Long and Hamilton avenues.  The new building, approved for tax abatement and city subsidies at city council last week, will become the new home of the police department’s Internal Affairs Bureau.

 

“It’s wrong,” Brown said. “They can coat it and flavor it however they want it, but it’s wrong.”

 

The onetime home of the Novelty Food Bar, which has sat vacant for about 30 years, is the linchpin of a plan by Mayor Michael Coleman and city officials to create a business and entertainment district on the near-east side. The building, proposed by Gideon Development, would house commercial tenants in addition to the Internal Affairs Bureau.

 

The King-Lincoln Bronzeville Association had proposed a different strategy. According to Brown, they had endorsed a plan for 50 condominiums on the site.

 

Read more at http://www.callandpost.com/topstories/default_article.asp?id=422

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Theater’s future about more than politics, mayor says.

Coleman seeks help from GOP Sen. DeWine to finish Lincoln Theater’s renovation

Saturday, August 19, 2006

Jim Siegel THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Mayor Michael B. Coleman wants all the help he can get in redeveloping the Lincoln Theater and doesn’t care if that means visiting the landmark with a Republican senator locked in a tough re-election campaign.  Coleman, a Democrat, gave Sen. Mike DeWine a personal tour of the historic theater yesterday afternoon, pointing out the progress already made and the potential to make the mostly gutted building a key part of the city’s arts community.

 

"Frankly, those who view this politically, shame on them," Coleman said, as he sat at a table on the theater’s renovated second floor next to DeWine, who is less than 12 weeks from the toughest election of his Senate career. 

"This is about the chance to make an unprecedented difference in this community," he added. "Sen. DeWine said he wants to help, and we want his help."

 

Read more at http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/08/19/20060819-D5-02.html

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From the 8/19/06 Dispatch:

 

 

Theater’s future about more than politics, mayor says

Coleman seeks help from GOP Sen. DeWine to finish Lincoln Theater’s renovation

Saturday, August 19, 2006

Jim Siegel THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

The 550-seat Lincoln Theater on E. Long Street was a cultural and neighborhood anchor for the black community in the 1930s.  Built in 1928-29, the city acquired it in 2004 for $1 million after the previous owner failed to complete renovation work.  Yesterday’s event marked the second pairing this month of odd-couple political heavyweights, at least one of whom has a personal stake in the outcome of the Nov. 7 election.

 

Nearly two weeks ago, Republican U.S. Sen. George Voinovich joined Rep. Ted Strickland, the Democratic nominee for governor, at an event in Cleveland to criticize a potential slot-machine proposal headed for the November ballot.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/08/19/20060819-D5-02.html

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From the 8/21/06 Dispatch:

 

 

Projects cause discord in King-Lincoln

Monday, August 21, 2006

Mark Ferenchik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Two small housing developments on the Near East Side have generated heated arguments and accusations of political favoritism.  They’re both important to Mayor Michael B. Coleman, who wants to revive the decayed King-Lincoln District as the thriving center of black life it was decades ago.  On July 31, the Columbus City Council voted to sell property for the projects to two groups that critics say are politically connected to the Coleman administration.

 

These are the two projects:

 

At the Monroe Cluster, along N. Monroe Avenue and Talmadge Street, developer Glavan Blackwell Resources plans to build 18 townhouses and 12 flats selling in the mid-$200,000s, along with first-floor shops. Another company run by Glavan Blackwell’s principal partner, Jeff Glavan, produced a video for Coleman two years ago on the King-Lincoln District that the mayor showed at his State of the City address, Safford said.

 

At the former Whitney Young Estates property at Hamilton and Mount Vernon avenues, a group that includes Shiloh, Trinity and Second Baptist churches wants to build 29 townhouses selling for about $200,000 each. The church group bought the land for $15,000.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/08/21/20060821-B1-01.html

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It's really a shame politics had to get intermingled with the attempted revitalization of the King-Lincoln/Bronzeville area. It'd be nice if they could stop pointing fingers and accusing this party of that and other and just work to get the neighborhoods closer to their former selves. Oh well, here's hoping that once the dust settles things will improve with time, both in terms of the people involved and the neighborhoods themselves.

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$4 MILLION PLEDGE

County to help Lincoln Theater

Commissioners join city in plan to boost development

Saturday, November 11, 2006

Mark Ferenchik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Franklin County will spend $4 million on the renovation of the Lincoln Theater, matching the $4 million Columbus has already pledged for the Near East Side landmark. The county will spend $1 million a year over four years to help spur economic development in the neighborhood, county Commissioner Paula Brooks said.

 

Brooks said the King-Lincoln neighborhood has long been neglected, and the revamped theater will serve as an anchor for the rest of the area. And the partnership with the city reflects the county’s commitment to economic growth.  "This is good public policy," Brooks said.

 

Officials have said they need at least $8 million to reopen the theater at 771 E. Long St., just east of I-71. The theater will seat 570 and has four storefronts and a ballroom. Columbus bought the theater for $1 million.

 

Read more at http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/11/11/20061111-C1-00.html

 

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Grocery store not welcome by some

Save-A-Lot project will benefit area, city officials say

Sunday, November 26, 2006

Mark Ferenchik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

A new Save-A-Lot grocery store is set to rise in an impoverished Near East Side neighborhood, but not everyone is buying into it.  The Columbus Compact Corp., the nonprofit group funded by the city and federal governments, is asking the city for a 10-year, 75-percent realestate tax abatement and a two-year, 75 percent personal property-tax abatement to renovate an old grocery and Salvation Army site on E. Main Street.  The building at 1179 E. Main St. was originally a Kroger store but hasn’t been a grocery for 30 years. Beard said the building is in good shape.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/11/26/20061126-C1-03.html

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You guys are all wrong, Save-a-lots generate lots of excitement!!!

 

It is every communities' dream to see this banner:

100_2484.jpg

 

If Cincy were smart, they'd level a block in OTR and the West End for them.

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In all seriousness, they can't all get "Kroger Marketplaces" but I think there does need to be a sort of standard (say, a Kroger but affordable for the residents).

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Sav-A-Lots are the nastiest grocery stores I have ever been to.  I went to a Sav-A-Lot one time and nearly puked.  The smell was awful and the food was of a very low quality.  Main Street has so much potential.  I'm with the guy in the story that said to simply wait.  The City of Columbus must not take an "any development is good development" approach.  The city may be saddled with a disproportionate share of Franklin County's low-income residents.  However, this is absolutely no reason for officials and "community developers" (and I use that term very, very lightly) to settle for one of the nastiest most disgusting grocery stores on this planet.   

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