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Bicycle Center uses grant to connect with kids

By GISELLE GOODMAN, Portland Press Herald Writer

Thursday, May 3, 2007

 

A $3,000 grant from the Maine Community Foundation is good news for the Community Bicycle Center in Biddeford. The money takes the center one step closer to becoming a viable, self-supporting organization.

 

Full story: http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/news/local/0705032nd.html

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SUBJECT:  Council Passes “Complete Streets” Law FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 

4/30/2007  3:50:00 PM FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

Krista Bunch, Drago Office, (206) 684-8801

George Howland, Jr.  (206) 684-8159

Councilmember Jan Drago

 

 

SEATTLE COUNCIL PASSES “COMPLETE STREETS” LAW

The City will have new principles for street design

 

SEATTLE- The Council, today, unanimously passed a “Complete Streets” ordinance that establishes new principals for street design. Councilmember Jan Drago, chair of the Transportation Committee, said, “‘Complete Streets’ support and encourage walking, bicycling, and transit use while promoting safe operations for all users.” Components of the “Complete Streets” design include street and sidewalk lighting, pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, public transit facilities accommodation, street trees, and more. With the passage of “Bridging the Gap,” a 9-year, $365 million, transportation levy in November 2006, the City will be undertaking numerous street improvements for Seattle’s citizens over the coming years. The “Complete Streets” policy will guide those investments and result in a transportation network that is more in line with the Council’s focus on effectively moving people and goods rather than primarily concentrating on vehicles. Councilmember Richard Conlin said, “‘Complete Streets’ will foster sustainability and give Seattleites better choices for mobility.”

 

Seattle joins two dozen jurisdictions nationwide that have already enacted “Complete Streets” and found great benefit from doing so. “Complete-Streets” principles advance Seattle’s Climate Action Plan. In the Puget Sound area, over 50 percent of greenhouse gas emissions are from cars and trucks. At the same time, the majority of Seattle’s car trips are just a few miles in length. Polls show that a majority of Americans want to walk and bicycle more, while health experts are increasingly able to link obesity and health problems to the lack of walkable neighborhoods. “Complete Streets” will provide real choices for people to walk, bike, and take transit for more trips resulting in healthier lifestyles and a healthier Seattle.

 

Since each street has unique needs and characteristics, the application of “Complete Streets” principles to each road will be different each time. The ordinance also recognizes the unique needs of freight mobility especially along streets designated as “major truck streets.”

 

Councilmember Drago said, “With a “Complete-Streets” policy firmly in place, the City will be able to balance the needs of all users of our streets and truly offer options for getting around the city without a car.”

 

-30-

 

Ordinance is available here: http://clerk.ci.seattle.wa.us/~scripts/nph-brs.exe?d=CBOR&s1=115861.cbn.&Sect6=HITOFF&l=20&p=1&u=/~public/cbor2.htm&r=1&f=G

 

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Power to pedalers: Save gas, save climate, save health

Maine bicyclists say their numbers are growing, and legislation to make their ride easier is in the works.

By JOHN RICHARDSON, Staff Writer

May 18, 2007

 

Rising gas prices don't concern Deb Moulton ... Moulton, an emergency room nurse from South Portland, pedals her bicycle almost everywhere she needs to go. She commutes by bike year-round across the Casco Bay Bridge. She doesn't even own a car.

 

Full story: http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/story.php?id=106531&ac=PHnws

 

 

 

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There's a need for a lot of education for both motorists and cyclists. Portland is probably more bike-friendly than 90 percent of US cities, but according to the article it still has its dangers.

 

For some drivers, I don't know what it will take to get through to them, short of a smack upside the head, and so far the laws don't permit that.

 

Cyclists, even the more accomplished ones, sometimes have things to learn, too. Experienced cyclists on good road bikes can keep up with traffic speeds in much of the city, and have a lot more maneuverability than car drivers. Unless they have the agility and alertness of bike messengers, though, they can get in trouble doing so. Drivers don't expect them to be moving that fast, and they can pop up out of nowhere before drivers have time to react.

 

Bike riders don't stand out in traffic; in fact, their small mass makes them easily obscured, and even when they see bikers, drivers aren't conditioned to expect them to be moving at traffic speeds. Bikers need to be aware of that, and allow time and space for drivers to make stupid, inconsiderate moves. I've seen riders traveling between the right lane of traffic and parked cars, passing a line that's stopped waiting for a light, and when the light changes as they approach the intersection, get knocked down or at least cut off and get mad as hell because somebody turned right in front of them. It shouldn't have happened, but they set themselves up.

 

Of course, there are the nincompoops who ride against traffic or careen down a busy sidewalk in a pedestrian area, blow through stoplights and stop signs with abandon, and generally show no awareness or consideration for anyone else. They need to be subject to the same laws that apply to drivers. Their bad behavior contributes to a climate of hostility toward all cyclists.

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The City of Columbus & the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) are jointly undertaking a Bicycle Master Plan.  They will be seeking input both on-line and in public meetings:

 

You can get info on-line at the following website....

 

www.altaplanning.com/columbus/

 

Some suggestions you may want to give them:

 

1. More bike racks / bike lockers downtown and in the immediate neighborhoods adjacent to downtown.

 

2. Bike Stations: a place where you can securly lock up your bike, have locker for your clothes and a place to shower/shave after your commute to work.

 

3. Bike lanes....bike lanes....bike lanes..... and with better, more visible markings for motorists to see them clearly.

 

4. Better maintenance of bike trails:  like power-washing the Canada Goose guano off the paths near North Bank Park and cutting back brush to make the paths safer or at least improve the view.

 

Just a few randon thoughts.  Let's hear yours.

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Simply Living's Peak Oil & Global Warming learning group has set up 2

meetings about pedestrian and bicycle plans in Columbus.  I hope you both

join us and spread the word.  

 

COLUMBUS - MAKE IT COOL!

Want to make Columbus more pedestrian and bicycle friendly?

 

WHO?

The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) and the City of Columbus

are working to make Columbus more pedestrian and bike friendly. 

 

WHAT?

YOUR interest and involvement are critical to make these plans a reality!

 

WHEN and WHERE?

Join us at these upcoming meetings or check these websites for opportunities

for public input:

 

PEDESTRIAN PLAN: Thursday, July 12th, 7-9 PM, 2231 N. High St. Rm. 100. Tony

Hull of MORPC will share details about MORPC's proposed pedestrian plan.

www.morpc.org

 

BICYCLE PLAN: Wednesday, August 29th, 7-9 PM, Whetstone Library - Hear more

about the proposed Columbus bicycle plan. Fill out the survey about

bicycling in Columbus by the end of July!  www.altaplanning.com/columbus

 

WHY?

Never doubt the power of citizens committed to a more sustainable community!

Join us!

 

Please contact Lisa Staggenborg (lstag@columbus.rr.com, 436-9931) with any

questions.  Visit www.simplyliving.org for more information.

 

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Bill protecting cyclists passes

Sharing roads - A recent death gives a push to a measure creating tougher penalties for careless drivers

Thursday, June 21, 2007

JAMES MAYER

 

SALEM -- A careless driver who kills or seriously injures a cyclist or other "vulnerable" road user will face much stiffer penalties -- up to a year's license suspension and a $12,500 fine -- under a bill that cleared the Oregon Legislature on Wednesday...

 

House Bill 3314 picked up speed after a 26-year-old Idaho woman with a suspended license struck and killed Washington County cyclist Tim O'Donnell as he signaled to make a left turn on a rural road earlier this month.

 

Original link:  http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1182396317323250.xml&coll=7

 

The cyclist's widow, Mary O'Donnell, watched from the gallery as the Senate approved the bill earlier this week.

 

 

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Licking County

Bike path erodes as officials debate

Wednesday,  July 4, 2007 3:27 AM

By Gail Martineau

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Licking County residents have nearly 40 miles of bike trail to enjoy. They just have to watch out for the potholes, cracks and creek erosion.

 

Full story: http://dispatch.com/dispatch/content/local_news/stories/2007/07/04/Bike_Trail.ART_ART_07-04-07_B4_JS76TPR.html

 

Link to info about TJ Evans Bike Trail: http://www.columbusinline.com/plac2sk8/johnstown_to_newark_trail.htm

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a new scooter shop is opening up in lakewood. a couple storefronts down from Around the Corner. im not sure what the name is but it looks like theyll be opening soon.

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a new scooter shop is opening up in lakewood. a couple storefronts down from Around the Corner. im not sure what the name is but it looks like theyll be opening soon.

Pride of Cleveland Scooters  http://www.clevelandscooters.com/    moved there from west 25th. Sad for me, good news for Lakewood. They are open 10 am tomorrow...really great people, great scooters!

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County exercise paths not always happy trails

Wednesday,  July 11, 2007 3:33 AM

By Kathy Lynn Gray

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

In a perfect world, bicyclists in Franklin County could ride trails without veering around ambling walkers or skidding to a stop because an errant dog has crossed their path.

 

Full story: http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/content/local_news/stories/2007/07/11/ruderide.ART_ART_07-11-07_B1_QP78JOA.html

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I never considered Solon particularly "bike-friendly." But what do I know... I just ride bikes.

 

Solon seeks 'Bicycle-Friendly' title

Posted by Ray Jablonski July 12, 2007 15:59PM

Categories: Breaking News

 

The City of Solon has filed an application with The League of American Bicyclists, based in Washington, D.C., to be recognized as a "Bicycle-Friendly Community."

 

"If we earn the designation, Solon would become the first city in Ohio to receive the national recognition," Mayor Kevin Patton said. He said the Bicycle-Friendly Community designation is an extension of the "Healthy Solon" program.

 

The mayor said the city hopes to have a decision regarding its application soon.

 

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Neal Peirce   

  A New Two-Wheeled Course?:

How To Get More Americans To Use Bicycles

July 8, 2007

 

Anne Lusk of Harvard's School of Public Health has a startling -- many would say quixotic -- ambition for America's cities. She'd like to equip them all with cycle tracks.

 

Full story: http://www.postwritersgroup.com/archives/peir070708.html

 

 

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Implamentation is the reason people dont bike.

 

For the most part bike paths dont go much of anywhere outside of a park, and are used for all sorts things not related to biking. It makes it painfully difficult to get through to people to understand that you wouldnt push your baby or walk your dog in the road, so why would you do that on a bike path?

 

Bike laws. A hodgepodge of laws that govern bike travel. Stuff like shaker heights requires a bike helmet, other cities dont. Places where you can and cannot bike.

 

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Wow.

 

Here in Lexington we have a "Metro bike" law. Bicyclists have an undue and unfair advantage against automobiles, and are granted many exceptions. For instance, as a bicycle commuter, I can coast through stop signs and traffic signals at my leisure when the coast is clear. No stop is required. This is because bicycles can gain distance from cars (and can be made more visible) by peeling ahead; will not trip signals with loop or infrared detectors; and for some (like me), it is cumbersome to keep clicking out of the pedals and then clicking back in block after block.

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I like the idea of separating cycle tracks from traffic by creating a parking lane away from the curb. Some of the cities I've visited, like South Bend, Indiana, have major thoroughfares that are disconcertingly wide and make the downtown feel barren and pedestrian-unfriendly; that would be a creative solution that would make the area more attractive and more functional for a wider variety of transport modes.

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I like the idea of separating cycle tracks from traffic by creating a parking lane away from the curb. Some of the cities I've visited, like South Bend, Indiana, have major thoroughfares that are disconcertingly wide and make the downtown feel barren and pedestrian-unfriendly; that would be a creative solution that would make the area more attractive and more functional for a wider variety of transport modes.

 

Do you mean having the bikes riding in the parking lane? Personally, I only like bike lanes on busy roads where cars can get major speed. On city streets in dense neighborhoods, most of the time I'll just take the lane so I don't have to worry about someone not seeing me and smacking into me or someone opening a door on me.

 

Of course, I have to admit I despise urban biking, and it's really trashed my cycling. I used to live in the country and could go 40 miles without seeing a stop light. That was awesome.

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Seicer I used to use toe clips - yeah pretty pointless in the city. I don't understand the not having to stop at stop signs idea, tho.

Rob one of the probs with a bike lane like that is: how do you make a left turn ?

I think that if you start making bike lanes, motorists will think that is the only place you should be. If you really need to get around - you need to use the road.

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Part of the answer lies in better driver education.  When's the last time you saw anything in either a driver training course or a BMV license exam that covered bike safety rules for motorists?

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Seicer I used to use toe clips - yeah pretty pointless in the city. I don't understand the not having to stop at stop signs idea, tho.

Rob one of the probs with a bike lane like that is: how do you make a left turn ?

I think that if you start making bike lanes, motorists will think that is the only place you should be. If you really need to get around - you need to use the road.

 

If there are bike lanes on a street than that IS where you should go.  If there aren't, then the majority of potential bikers won't take that route, anyway.  Of course, if there isn't a bike lane then bikes do and should have full rights to the road.  But a few hardcore bikers willing to share the streets with heavy auto traffic doesn't a transportation system make. 

 

I think that nearly all major streets should have bike lanes, as they do in The Netherlands.  Also, in The Netherlands, if you need to make a left turn, you generally wait for the signal to change, as a pedestrian on a sidewalk would.  A pain, but worth it considering the overall quality and comfort of the system.

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Actually, I take the lane because its safer. If I want to make a turn, I can look behind, signal with my hand (more like pointing at the lane, since drivers are clueless about proper hand signals), and turn. Motorists can see you, will not likely run over you. Stay in the _middle_ of the lane, not on the white stripe or in the right-tire path.

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"since drivers are clueless about proper hand signals"

:-)

Whenever I use a hand signal, I wonder what the cage pilots think of it because I know they don't have any idea what I am doing.

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As I said earlier, there needs to be better education at the driver education level, both at the beginners level and when licenses are renewed. I use hand signals as well and I make sure I use them well in advance of any turn, just to make sure whoever's behind or ahead of me sees me. But you can never assume they understand.

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"Hey, I think that commie pinko on da bike just done flipped me the bird! I'm a-gonna plaster his pedal-pumpin' puss all over da side of my pickup and plaster his ass on my Yosemite Sam mudflaps!!"  crazy.gif


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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^ hahaha

 

The worst when some motorcyclist started trash talking with me on a country road. He even flicked me off! Around here, I get yelled at least once every time I take to the roads in the Rocky River Reservation....a METRO PARK!!!

 

"Get off the road!!"

"OK, would you prefer I get on the bike paths and running over every granny, jogger and little kid on their first BMX bike? Sounds like a plan."

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Wanted: More butts on bikes

Portland looks at how to make cycling more attractive to all

By Jennifer Anderson 

The Portland Tribune, Jul 20, 2007

 

A little morning rain didn’t stop the stream of bike and foot traffic over the Hawthorne Bridge on Tuesday morning. City Hall hopes to get even more people biking by revamping Portland’s master bike plan.

The unexpected downpour this week didn’t throw Eva Frazier for a loop at all.

 

Full story: http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/story.php?story_id=118488987395788100

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Flynn is an idiot: "I don't want more bike lanes because the existing ones don't take me where I want to go?" Uh, OK. Good thinking there pal. So Henry Ford probably said: "I'm not going to build cars for the masses because we don't have enough paved roads." Of course he didn't. He joined with other like-minded people and lobbied for public funding for paved roads. So the Wright Brothers told the Army: "We're not going to build you any planes because there aren't any airports or hangars." Of course they didn't. They built them.

 

As for the user-fee concept, it has its definite drawbacks such as stifling (if not outright removing) public debate as to whether continually investing in a user-funded mode of transportation is the wisest course of action either for a specific project or as a general principle overall.


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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“If people want special amenities for bikes, they need to find a way to fund them,” says Craig Flynn, a Parkrose resident who ran for Metro Council in 2002 and speaks around town on transportation and density issues. “If bikes are getting more than their fair share, they need to find a way to fund it through their user fees. We need money for cars.”

 

I don't object to the "user pays" concept. To achieve the quickest, largest impact, we should start with cars, because they incur the greatest overall costs.

 

Equip cars with event recorders that keep track of gps info, speed, and engine sensor data (to monitor emissions). At annual registration renewal, recorder data can be used to compute the owner's share of public infrastructure costs, and the amount can be added to the registration fee.

 

That's much more equitable than taxing people who don't own cars, in order to pay for amenities for car users.

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The League of American Bicyclists opposed dedicated bike routes because they expected that governments would force the cyclists to use the lanes and prohibit use of the public roads.  Further, the bike-routes would be poorly maintained or patrolled for safety or crime.

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That's just stupid.  Plain stupid.  The number of bicylists willing to share the public road is relatively insignificant.  Way to protect a minority of hardcore experts at the expense of expanding bicycling as a mainstream mode of transportation.  Idiots.

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Columbus leaders peddle plan to be more pedal-friendly

 

A Bicentennial Bikeways Plan seeks to add miles of safe lanes.

 

By JENNIFER WRAY

 

Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman and Councilwoman Maryellen O'Shaughnessy took to the city's bike paths Thursday to announce the launch of a plan intended to ease the way for bicyclists.

 

Full story: http://www.snponline.com/NEWS8-1/8-2_colbikes.htm

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It might be a good time to take up biking

 

By FELLICIA SMITH

REPOSITORY STAFF WRITER

 

With gas prices reaching $3 a gallon more than once this year, another option to get to work and around town is bicycling.

 

Full story: http://www.cantonrepository.com/index.php?Category=9&ID=369891&r=8&subCategoryID=

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

http://www.cantonrep.com

 

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Trail repairs face more obstacles

Busy path riddled with potholes at OSU, bikers say

Monday,  August 20, 2007 3:23 AM

By Tim Doulin

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

It looks like much-needed and delayed improvements to the Olentangy bike trail that runs through Ohio State University won't begin until next year.

 

Full story: http://dispatch.com/dispatch/content/local_news/stories/2007/08/20/OSUTRAIL.ART_ART_08-20-07_B5_EA7LNQ6.html

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