Jump to content
KJP

Cycling Advocacy

Recommended Posts

Looks like China's learning the lesson faster than we were able to....

 

China backs bikes to kick car habit

 

Jonathan Watts in Shanghai

Thursday June 15, 2006

 

Guardian

 

Having spent the past decade pursuing a transport policy of four wheels rich, two wheels poor, the Chinese government has suddenly rediscovered the environmental and health benefits of the bicycle.

The construction ministry announced on Thursday that any bike lanes that have been narrowed or destroyed to make way for cars in recent years must be returned to their original glory. This followed orders on Tuesday that all civil servants should cycle to work or take public transport to reduce the smog that chokes most city streets and urban lungs.

 

Full Story: http://www.guardian.co.uk/china/story/0,,1798536,00.html

 


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

China's authoritarian government might be able to make it happen, to some degree.

 

A government chosen in a popularity contest administered by the greedy and pandering to the the short-sighted, selfish and ignorant wouldn't be inclined to try it or able to accomplish it. (I guess that applies to almost all needed social reforms  :-) )

 

As much as I love bikes and riding them, it will take more than bike lanes to get me to emigrate to China.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

INTRODUCTION OF NEW COMMUTER RAIL BIKE COACH:

 

MBTA General Manager Daniel A. Grabauskas today announced the first ever commuter rail coach equipped with 40 stationary bike racks. Renovated to accommodate the many bike enthusiasts who travel on the Gloucester commuter rail line throughout the summer, the new coach will debut July 2nd during the “Ride To The Races” 47th Annual Fitchburg Longsjo Classic. MBTA General Manager Grabauskas directed his staff to schedule an extra passenger train after organizers of the Longsjo Classic approached the MBTA. The passenger train includes a new renovated bike coach that accommodates 42 customers and 40 bicycles. “The timing is perfect. With the bike car ready to roll, it only makes sense to debut it for a cycling event,” said MBTA General Manager Grabauskas. “By giving people yet another reason to choose public transportation, we continue our efforts to attract more customers by making the system easier to use and a lot more convenient. This is what quality customer service is all about.” On Sunday, July 2nd, an extra train to accommodate cyclists participating in the South Acton to Fitchburg race will depart from North Station at 10:50 a.m. arriving in South Acton at 11:45 a.m. The train will make all stops between North Station and South Acton. The train will then continue express to Fitchburg arriving at 12:20 p.m. For customers returning to North Station, a train will depart Fitchburg at 7:15 p.m., make all stops and arrive North Station at 8:40 p.m. On Saturday, July 8th, the bike coach will be introduced on the Gloucester commuter rail line. (MBTA - posted 6/23/06)

http://railpace.com/hotnews/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a refreshing change of pace for commuter rail. There's been increasing support for cyclists on city transit systems, both in the addition of bike racks to transit buses and in the acceptance of a limit number of bikes on light & heavy rail during off-peak periods, but the commuter rail systems have shown entrenched resistance.

 

I suppose part of the reason has been capacity. The South Shore trains running east from Chicago tend to be packed at any time of day, because they ration equipment for maintenance purposes during off-peak periods; off-peak trains may be only one married pair, and eastbound they fill up after Van Buren or Roosevelt.

 

Another issue might be boarding congestion. Whereas many urban light and heavy rail systems have level-platform boarding, commuter rail often uses low-level platforms at suburban stations, and carrying bikes up and down the steps, around tight corners and though narrow doorways could slow boarding and detraining and create potential liability risks from boarding/detraining injuries.

 

I would love to be able to take my bike with me to Chicago on the South Shore. Unfortunately, "Bicycles are Prohibited (except if disassembled and carried on board in a bag or container expressly designed for such purposes and stowed in the overhead luggage rack)."

 

Discussion of the topic reminds me of a demonstration in New York quite a few years ago where a group of bicycle advocates boarded a subway carrying an extension ladder and large pieces of furniture, each carried by two people, and were not challenged. When one of the group tried to take a bicycle onto the platform, he was threatened with arrest if he persisted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Discussion of the topic reminds me of a demonstration in New York quite a few years ago where a group of bicycle advocates boarded a subway carrying an extension ladder and large pieces of furniture, each carried by two people, and were not challenged. When one of the group tried to take a bicycle onto the platform, he was threatened with arrest if he persisted.

 

I love demonstrations like that. It reveals what happens when group-think, bureaucracy, unchecked momentum, and institutionalized stupidity immunizes us from rational thought.

 

An option you and others might consider for taking bikes on transit is the folding bike. Here are some examples:

 

http://www.dahon.com/

 

http://www.bromptonbicycle.co.uk

 

http://www.xootr.com/xootr/swift/bikes.shtml?gclid=CNySi-Cd34UCFSyVFQodwFSwVg

 

And here's a whole bunch of different bikes, including accessories such as carrying bags for your bike:

 

http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/biz/section.php?xSec=10


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't looked at Dahon in quite some time; they've come a long way from the tiny-wheeled bikes that weren't quite big enough for me. I'm not all that tall (5'10"), but I'm long-legged for my height and I ride a 24" or 25" frame in a road bike. I couldn't feature tackling significant distances in traffic or on busy paths on one.

 

The 20-inch wheels and somewhat larger frame size, along with the backpack carrying bag, make Dahon sound like serious portable urban transportation. With the price tag ($500+) I'll have to think about it for a while, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Delaware blazes trails for bikes

‘Visionary’ project is response to needs of growing population, city officials say

Saturday, July 08, 2006

Jane Hawes

FOR THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

DELAWARE, Ohio — Not too long ago, oak and sycamore trees grew on a 15-foot hill along a train line.

 

Today, it’s a broad, sloping plain of clay-heavy dirt where bulldozers roam and dozens of concrete pipes rest. And by the end of the year, Delaware officials hope, the scene will have changed again, to one that is filled with bicycles and joggers.

 

Full story: http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/07/08/20060708-B1-03.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what are they planning to do (concerning the old CSX track) at Henry St?  They already took out the old one lane overpass last year.  Grade it for an intersection?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tell you what.... biking across that high-iron trestle ought to be a blast.  Can't wait for this trail to be done.  Delaware and the area around it are naturals for some good bike trails. 

 

What would really be great would be if they would consider making a trail out of the old Columbus-Delaware & Marion interurban line between Delaware, Prospect and Marion.  Much of the old ROW (right-of-way) is still there and paralells the highway along the Scioto River, and it's a fairly scenic ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cyclists: Soon, uniform rules to rule the roadways in Ohio

Kaye Spector

(Cleveland) Plain Dealer

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

 

Bicycling will soon be less confusing - and, advocates say, safer - when changes to several state laws go into effect Sept. 21.

 

Ohio cycling laws will conform more closely with those governing motorists across the state ...

 

... More at http://www.cleveland.com/ohio/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/news/115692681699050.xml&coll=2&thispage=1

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Article published September 20, 2006

 

Groups applaud Ohio law standardizing bicycle rules

 

By DAVID PATCH

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

 

An Ohio law that standardizes traffic rules for bicyclists statewide and forbids municipalities from banishing bicycles to sidewalks or trails takes effect tomorrow, ending what cycling organizations say was an often conflicting patchwork of local regulations.

 

Full story: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060920/NEWS11/609200415

-- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish Columbus were a lot more serious about making the city more bike-friendly. There are plenty of examples right here in the states to look at for improvements.

 

How bike-friendly cities got that way

 

Sunday, May 18, 2003

 

By Tatyana Margolin

 

San Francisco

 

San Francisco has the highest quality of life in the United States, according to a survey by Mercer Human Resource Consulting. It also is consistently ranked by Bicycling Magazine as a top city for cycling.

 

Full Story: http://www.post-gazette.com/lifestyle/20030518bikesidelifestyle6p6.asp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish Columbus were a lot more serious about making the city more bike-friendly. There are plenty of examples right here in the states to look at for improvements.

 

How bike-friendly cities got that way

 

"There is less congestion [and] traffic, and there are no vast parking lots," said Jen Fox of the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh, who lived in Portland for a year and a half before moving back to Pittsburgh. "Portland is a role model."

 

Pittsburgh isn't exactly a slouch when it comes to being bike-friendly.

 

I may have related this story about San Francisco before; we old folks are allowed to repeat ourselves, though, so cut me some slack.

 

In the late seventies in San Francisco, I rode my bike to the parking lot at the top of Twin Peaks and then coasted all the way to the Ferry Terminal without pedaling. I had to time my approach to some stoplights to avoid stopping, but made the whole distance without turning the pedals or putting my feet on the ground. I'm not sure of the distance any more, but I think it was a few miles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I owe you guys a link on this, but there was a story in last week's Baton Rouge paper about plans for a bicycle trail from Baton Rouge to New Orleans, on top of the Mississippi levee (providing that we still have faith in the Corp of Engineers work)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Discussion of the topic reminds me of a demonstration in New York quite a few years ago where a group of bicycle advocates boarded a subway carrying an extension ladder and large pieces of furniture, each carried by two people, and were not challenged. When one of the group tried to take a bicycle onto the platform, he was threatened with arrest if he persisted.

 

This almost sounds like something related to Critical Mass, though CM are more mass bike rides than smallish actions like that

 

Critical Mass

 

and the Bay Area CM site (the "movement" got its start in SF)

 

Critical Mass History

 

....looking at the last site one can see the alternative culture/activist impetus behind the concept.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't think bike trails help at all; I mean, if you have to get off and walk your bike across the intersection at every intersection (as required by law), thats not really drawing too many riders. Mason (Cincinnati) has bike trails almost everywhere... and who uses them? joggers, if not nobody... West Chester (on Cox rd.) has a bike lane, but nobody uses it (it's not a system - its just an isolated stretch). What they really need are bike lanes on every major road; then people might start using them.

 

-They also need sidewalks... in the 4 miles from my house to my school, theres only about 1.5 miles of paved walking surfaces

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^It sounds like you live in a sprawling suburb.  Sidewalks might cut car trips by 1-2%.  Almost everything is outside the .25mi radius people will actually walk, the streetscape isn't interesting enough to keep people walking, and there probably isn't any public transportation with less than a 12-15 minute headway that could act as a pedestrian accelerator.  I suggest you move.  You can't reverse engineer the suburbs to be accessable with anything else aside from cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Mason  :-(

2. I'd walk, but only because i can't drive yet

3. The nearest bus is the West Chester Express at hwy 75... about 10 miles away

4. I can't move... see #2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry about that.  I was once a prisoner in a sea of hundreds of quarter acre lots.  take my advice, go to college in a city, a real one. 

 

parents try to do their best for their children by shielding them from the dangers that the evening news prattles on about, but they fail to realize that the suburbs don't work for the young, old, disabled or poor. 

 

Children who grow up without diversity, art, culture, spontaneity end up unable or unwilling to question most things.  They are like fish in a suburban sea that assume the benefits of the suburbs (low crime, nice schools) are due to the physical layout of the neighborhood and not the composition or demographics of the people there.  If you put all the rich people in any type of living arangement there will be low crime and nice school, if you put an exclusively group of poor people in suburban housing, the quarter acre of mowing each week won't change the economic realities of accidition and lack of opportunity.

 

I sympathize with your situation, best of luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't think bike trails help at all;

Mason (Cincinnati) has bike trails almost everywhere... and who uses them? joggers, if not nobody... West Chester (on Cox rd.) has a bike lane, but nobody uses it (it's not a system - its just an isolated stretch). What they really need are bike lanes on every major road; then people might start using them.

I fairly agree with you.

I do not drive. I seldom ride recreationally. I am not a fan of bike lanes as they tend to give motorists (cage pilots ?) the idea that those are the only places bikes should be allowed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Electrically-assisted bicycles are a good possibility.  Bionx has a conversion-kit for a regular bicycle.  There are electric-assist bicycles available from dealers of Giant Bicycle Co.  I rode a Bionx conversion briefly, once.  It seems like good technology.

www.bionx.ca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Transportation diversity video, mostly about bikes, from Portland...

 


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We should start a "what are you pedaling?" thread on UrbanOhio.  I have a project bike going in the basement that I cannot wait to talk about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We should start a "what are you pedaling?" thread on UrbanOhio.  I have a project bike going in the basement that I cannot wait to talk about.

Go for it

My bike is a piece of crap off the shelf but I can start it if you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of links here on bike lanes.

 

Bike Lanes: Pros & Cons

 

http://bicycleuniverse.info/transpo/bikelanes.html

 

Yeah, there's quite a debate in the bike community over the validity of bike lanes. A lot of cyclists like are very hardcore vehicular cyclists where they want to ride in traffic like everyone else. Personally, I like bike lanes in suburban, rural areas where traffic is going fast, but I "take the lane" in more narrow, urban areas, such as on Detroit in Lakewood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shudder when I see people riding bikes on the street past my house. It's a one-way arterial going out of town that's posted 35mph, but where typical speeds are 40-50mph and drivers are competitive and aggressive. There's a quiet residential street that runs parallel just a block away, and that leads to a paved greenway path that continues on westward a couple of miles. 

 

The people that I see doing it usually aren't hard-core cyclists. More likely they're dorks who lost their licenses because of DUI, or beat their old junkers to death and couldn't get them fixed. Sometimes they're smoking a cigarette as they grind away with chattering misaligned derailleurs and half-flat tires. I guess it's just natural selection at work. :roll:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We should start a "what are you pedaling?" thread on UrbanOhio. 

I can start it if you want.

This sounds like a thread for the UrbanBar, doesn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I Wasn't sure.

:-)

That or Transportation.

The mods can only move it if it's wrong.  You could put it somewhere daff and then you will be sure it will end up in the right place. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paris Embraces Plan to Become City of Bikes

 

By John Ward Anderson

Washington Post Foreign Service

Saturday, March 24, 2007; A10

 

PARIS, March 23 -- Paris is for lovers -- lovers of food and art and wine, lovers of the romantic sort and, starting this summer, lovers of bicycles.

 

On July 15, the day after Bastille Day, Parisians will wake up to discover thousands of low-cost rental bikes at hundreds of high-tech bicycle stations scattered throughout the city, an ambitious program to cut traffic, reduce pollution, improve parking and enhance the city's image as a greener, quieter, more relaxed place.

 

Full story: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/23/AR2007032301753.html

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neal Peirce / Syndicated columnist

Pedal pushers making headway

Seattle Times

 

Are we ready to go bicycling? Could these times of climate change, gas-price inflation and bulging waistlines be prepping us for new waves of weekend biking adventures? Maybe even to leave cars parked and cycle to work daily?

 

Full Story: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/opinion/2003667576_peirce16.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noozer, great article, very inspiring.

 

I wonder what it will take to move Cleveland in this direction?  Although Cleveland does not have the climate of Louisville, I wonder what is possible here?  I will pass this article along to Marty Cader, head of the City's Bicycle Planning initiatives and also the one responsible for getting bicycles and related infrastructure into the City's Capital Budget. 

 

I like that the article focuses on transportation cycling and that it relates cycling to petroleum displacement.

FYI - This year's EarthFest celebration at the zoo will feature a velomobile from German Manufacturer Go-One, a true answer to all season cycling > http://www.go-one.us

 

Last, I wonder if Louisville's increased emphasis on 'complete streets' has anything to do with their recent regional approach to City/County Govt, which I believe occurred around 2000.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Campus pedestrians: Be alert

N. High stretch is tops for accidents, MORPC study finds

Monday,  April 23, 2007 3:33 AM

By Tim Doulin

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Pedestrians chat on cell phones or listen to iPods as they cross N. High Street at 15th Avenue, the gateway to Ohio State University.

 

Full story: http://dispatch.com/dispatch/content/local_news/stories/2007/04/23/PEDXING.ART_ART_04-23-07_B1_RE6FE2P.html

 

******************************

 

Bicyclists, businesses finding ways to co-exist amid traffic congestion

Business First of Columbus - April 20, 2007by Kevin KemperBusiness First

Janet Adams | Business First

 

The managing partner of Calfee Halter & Griswold LLP in Columbus doesn't dislike cars, he just thinks it's ridiculous that it takes "a 3,000-pound steel box" and a tank of gasoline to get one person to and from work.

 

Full story: http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2007/04/23/story16.html 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Article published April 24, 2007

 

State Senator Fedor finishes long bike ride that peddled phys ed class

 

BLADE COLUMBUS BUREAU

 

COLUMBUS - With a dark purple bruise below one knee as proof, Senate Democratic leader Teresa Fedor yesterday rode her bicycle to the steps of the Ohio Statehouse after completing a 150-mile trek from Toledo to draw attention to physical education in schools.

 

Full story: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070424/NEWS24/704240387/-1/NEWS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...