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Columbus: Brewery District Developments and News

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I still say this Antique Mall property project is going nowhere.  It sounds like the developer got roundly rejected during their conceptual review back in April and this "we'll move the building" proposal is a last ditch attempt to win over the Brewery District Commission.

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Here's another project up for conceptual review at tomorrow's Brewery District Commission:

 

Apartments Proposed for CD102.5 Property in Brewery District

 

A new apartment development has been proposed for 1036 S. Front St., the current site of radio station CD102.5 and its music venue the Big Room Bar.

 

The proposal, from local company Gallas Zadeh Development, calls for a 42-unit apartment building on the half-acre site.  It’s listed on the agenda for this Thursday’s Brewery District Commission meeting as a conceptual review, meaning no vote will be taken on the proposal.  A site plan and elevations submitted to the city show a three-story building served by a 40-space parking lot.  The parking would be accessed from either Redbud Alley or the alley running parallel to Front Street.

 

The station moved to 1036 S. Front Street in 2011 and opened the Big Room Bar there in 2015.  Swiss Family Home, LLC — registered to CD102.5 owner Randy Malloy — is listed on the Franklin County Auditor’s site as the owner of the parcel.

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/apartments-proposed-for-cd-102-5-property-in-brewery-district-bw1

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On 10/31/2018 at 2:45 PM, Columbo said:

I still say this Antique Mall property project is going nowhere.  It sounds like the developer got roundly rejected during their conceptual review back in April and this "we'll move the building" proposal is a last ditch attempt to win over the Brewery District Commission.

 

I ain't sayin - I'm just sayin:

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/schiff-properties-withdraws-plan-to-move-antique-mall-building-bw1

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Planning Underway for Major Redevelopment Project in the Brewery District

 

"Local architecture firm Schooley Caldwell is now attached to a plan to redevelop the former Hoster Brewing Company complex in the Brewery District.

The collection of large, interconnected buildings includes the former Wasserstrom Company headquarters, at 477 S. Front St., as well as the brewery’s former mash house, which has been empty for years. Also included within the scope of the project is a surface parking lot, which could potentially be developed with new buildings."

 

Existing:

 

Hoster-aerial-620x315.png

 

Preliminary drawing:

 

Hoster-aerial-renderings-620x289.png

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/brewery-district-redevelopment-bw1

Edited by aderwent
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$70M Brewery District project hopes to change the neighborhood

 

Developer Dwight McCabe has spent a year lining up plans for the former Hoster Brewing Co. properties at 477 S. Front St. that would turn a complex of brick buildings into a 245,000-square-foot mixed-use project with restaurants, retail, offices and a new hotel in the Brewery District.

 

A $70 million plan would bring a new mixed-use development to the former brewery complex at 477 S. Front St.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/12/06/70m-brewery-district-project-hopes-to-change-the.html

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^ More about this from Business First today (I don't know how much of this is viewable for non-subscribers, so a synopsis and the graphics for the project are included below):

 

$70M Brewery District project hopes to change the neighborhood

 

A planned $70 million development would transform a prominent block of the Brewery District near downtown.  Developer Dwight McCabe has spent a year lining up plans for the former Hoster Brewing Co. properties at 477 S. Front St. that would turn a complex of brick buildings into a 245,000-square-foot mixed-use project with restaurants, retail, offices and a new hotel. ... Phasing the project over a year and half will make it easier to get things done, McCabe said.

 

The first phase would focus on 120,000 square feet bound by Front and Fulton streets and Ludlow Alley, where a 40,000-square-foot addition would go.  It would include a 140-room hotel and 15,000-square-foot venue, 15,000 square feet of office space and 40,000 square feet of food service, restaurant, retail, coffee and a rooftop bar.  The key anchor for the first phase of the development is a "unique, boutique" hotel, McCabe said.

 

The second phase would redevelop about 100,000 square feet in the historic warehouse buildings west of Ludlow Alley.  That would include 30,000 square feet of office space, 10,000 square feet of commercial and retail space and loft apartments.

 

The third phase would be a new building – 66,000 to 100,000 square feet – south of the warehouses and west of the alley. It would house either office space or condominiums.  The fourth phase would be a parking structure with space above for either office or apartments based on market need.  The project would coincide with coming construction that will realign the I-70 exit ramp next to the property.  Once it's finished, a significant portion of traffic coming into downtown will pass the property.

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/12/06/70m-brewery-district-project-hopes-to-change-the.html

 

screen-shot-2018-12-05-at-53142-pm.png

 

0.jpg

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Looking good. Should help connect the River South neighborhood with the Brewery District! Wonder what brand hotel they're trying to lure?

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This addition looked way cooler when it was more modern. Still kept the historic massing but made a really abrupt departure from all of the historic brick in the immediate vicinity. This is... a little 80s office park-y? Hopefully this continues to evolve and refine and we'll see some aesthetic improvements. Regardless couldn't be happier that such a prominent corner is getting some action and development!

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Brewery District's Maennerchor building saved as investors plan $2M renovation

 

996-high-maennerchor-img0647*750xx4032-2

 

The distinctive Maennerchor building in the Brewery District is no longer facing threats of demolition thanks to a pair of anonymous donors.

 

The donors have contributed $527,000 to buy the 10,700-square-foot building at 966 S. High St., which will be acquired by the nonprofit Jefferson Avenue Center and will be renovated.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/02/20/brewery-districts-maennerchor-building-saved-as.html


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Historic Maennerchor Building to be Preserved

 

Over the past two years, the fate of the historic Maennerchor building at 966 S. High St. has been up in the air. But thanks to the efforts of two anonymous philanthropists, the building is slated for renovation and preservation in partnership with the nonprofit Jefferson Avenue Center. The property was purchased from the Columbus Board of Education and handed over to the Jefferson for project management.

 

“We could not be more pleased to be entrusted with this storied property” stated Katharine Moore, Executive Director of the Jefferson Avenue Center. “Architect Mark Ours, the principal of Mode Architects, has created a stunning renovation concept that will showcase the remaining historic elements, while transforming the building into an attractive and functional space for future nonprofit tenants. This a a one-of-kind preservation success story.”

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/historic-maennerchor-building-to-be-preserved-we1

 

Maennerchor-1150x550.jpg


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Photos: Inside the Historic Hoster Brewery Complex

 

Hoster-project-rendering-620x382.jpg

 

The McCabe Companies’ plan to redevelop the former Hoster Brewing Company complex in the Brewery District is proceeding full steam ahead, according to Principal Dwight McCabe.

 

Despite the complexity of the project and a recent setback – it was not one of the projects awarded state historic preservation tax credits in December – McCabe said his team is poised to move forward immediately, pending the state’s announcement of the next round of tax credit awardees this summer.

 

The first phase of the development will encompass the block bordered by West Fulton Street, South Front Street, Brewers Alley and South Ludlow Street.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/photos-inside-the-historic-hoster-brewery-complex-bw1

 

Hoster-project-site-plan-620x420.png

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Ambitious Brewery District revival project wins historic tax credits

 

The Ohio Development Services Agency awarded the project $5 million in tax credits Wednesday – a big step forward in financing the mixed-use redevelopment that could help it gain the leverage to begin construction work.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/06/26/ambitious-brewery-district-revival-project-wins.html

 

AR-181208558.jpg

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Hoster Brewery Redevelopment Wins Tax Credits

 

Dwight McCabe, the developer behind a plan to redevelop the historic Hoster Brewery complex, received some good news from the State of Ohio today.

 

The Ohio Development Services Agency announced that the $70 million project has been awarded $5 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits.

 

The Brewery District development, located at 477 S. Front St., is the only Columbus project among 28 historic rehabilitation projects statewide that were awarded the tax credits.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/hoster-brewery-redevelopment-wins-tax-credits-bw1

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/06/26/developer-delays-made-hoster-brewing-redevelopment.html

 

Hoster4-1150x550.jpg

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Dispatch has a youtube video of the massive Hoster redevelopment (above) from its article about it (linked below):

 

https://www.dispatch.com/business/20190626/plan-to-turn-hoster-brewing-complex-into-hotel-offices-restaurants-gets-preservation-tax-break-from-ohio

 

According to the article, the developer Dwight McCabe said his company hopes to start this project by the end of the summer.  The first step will be removing the 1960s-era Wasserstrom building along Front Street - which would be replaced by a seven-story hotel with 115 to 125 rooms and ground-floor restaurants.  The rest of the first phase of the project, which McCabe hopes to finish by early 2021, will also include offices and industrial loft-type apartments.

 

The second phase will include offices and apartments in an existing building behind the hotel building.  McCabe said he also will seek tax credits for that phase.  A third phase could include a new office, residential and parking tower.

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We haven't heard much from the Whittier Peninsula west of the Brewery District because the completion of Scioto Audubon Park Metro Park a few years ago pretty much completed the redevelopment/cleanup of this area.  However, there is one 200,000 sq. ft. warehouse remaining in the Whittier Peninsula that was formerly used as a warehouse for Lazarus.  Local developer E.V. Bishoff purchased the Lazarus warehouse in 1990 and has been renovating it recently:

 

Warehouse redevelopment near downtown lures two more tenants

 

One of the largest industrial properties near downtown has continued its revival with two new tenants and a garage.  E.V. Bishoff Co. has continued to rehabilitate the 200,000-square-foot former Lazarus warehouse building at 371 Maier Place, within the Audubon Park Metro Park just west of the Brewery District.  Termed the Audubon Park Office Center building, it has now attracted two new names.

 

Path Robotics, a company looking to develop automation products, and New Albany-based furnishings and interior design company Bungalow Home have each signed 10,000-square-foot leases in the building. ... The new tenants join WillowWorks, an early-stage investment company launched by Ohio-based prosthetics manufacturer WillowWood to support emerging technology and startups especially in medical devices and other kinds of sensors. 

 

The developer also took about 50,000 square feet of space inside the building to convert to a 150-space climate controlled indoor parking garage where it will charge $100 a month.  “In addition to servicing the needs of office clients, the garage offers parking for Downtown, German Village and Brewery District residents to park any additional cars they own,” David Bishoff, president of E.V. Bishoff Company, said in a statement.  “The garage also offers state, federal and local government entities as well as large downtown corporations a place to store their vehicle fleets at a discounted rate.”

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/08/22/warehouse-redevelopment-near-downtown-lures-two.html

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Here are a few visuals of the former Lazarus warehouse that sits within the Scioto Audubon Park Metro Park:

 

Overview of the entire Scioto Audubon Metro Park and surrounding areas with the former Lazarus warehouse marked:

48612718733_3b49dc2db2_b_d.jpg

 

 

Close-up aerial of the former Lazarus warehouse within the park.  The park's water tower and climbing wall are located across an interior access road from the warehouse:

48613225837_56603ea932_b_d.jpg

 

 

View of the renovated front of the warehouse:

48612748238_06c56a6d4d_z_d.jpg

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I appreciate the improvements and the value of the space but part of me will always be a bit sad it wasn't scooped up years ago to complete the park. 

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Paywalled article regarding new details emerging with the Hoster Brewing Redevelopment in the Brewery District

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/10/30/exclusive-new-details-revealed-for-next-phase-of.html?iana=hpmvp_colum_news_headline

 

General breakdown

- The project will take place over four phases 

- Phase I interior work has already begun on the 477 building converting 120,000 sq/ft to office, retail, event space, 140 room boutique hotel, and a rooftop bar/restaurant.

- Phase II will bring 101,000 sq/ft of mixed-use space broken down into 30,000 sq/ft of office, 28 loft apartments, 31,000 sq/ft of co-working space, and 5,400 sq/ft of retail. 

- Phase III will include the construction of a 66,000-100,000 sq/ft building to house office and condos.

- Phase IV will include structured parking with office and apartments above. 

 

Additionally, 

- A $2.45M Tax Credit application has been filed for Phase II, the western block of Hoster Brewing structures (Located behind 477 S Front).

- Total development cost still remains undisclosed. 

- The development sits within a 1-mile radius of 15,000 residents with an average income over $82,000.

- I-70 carries 122,000 passengers past the development daily and High St carries 19,000 passengers past daily.

- The project sits within a historic district also making it eligible for neighborhood reinvestment tax credits down the line. 

 

I am curious to see how this project progresses along, I think it will be huge for the area. Overall the design of the addition is the only thing I don't love, but I have seen some renders/concepts indicating we just may see some height in future portions of the project. Let's hope the market stays strong and warrants it. 

 

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4 minutes ago, DevolsDance said:

I have seen some renders/concepts indicating we just may see some height in future portions of the project.

 

What kind of height are we talking here? ~10 stories?

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10 minutes ago, cbussoccer said:

 

What kind of height are we talking here? ~10 stories?

 

Perhaps it will be influenced by the TMUD passage as well. If they want to try and get that credit, they need no less than a 15 story component. 

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5 minutes ago, cbussoccer said:

 

What kind of height are we talking here? ~10 stories?

 

The early designs I had seen were in the 15-22 story range. I was not the biggest fan of the tower design, but it was "iconic" for sure. I know they wanted to push this to later phases and focus on the renovations/rehab of the existing structure first, then base the addition sizing and height on demand and financing once they reach that point. I believe they were looking an 7-10 year timeline for all phases. 

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37 minutes ago, DevolsDance said:

The early designs I had seen were in the 15-22 story range. I was not the biggest fan of the tower design, but it was "iconic" for sure. I know they wanted to push this to later phases and focus on the renovations/rehab of the existing structure first, then base the addition sizing and height on demand and financing once they reach that point. I believe they were looking an 7-10 year timeline for all phases. 

 

Oh wow. I never thought we would get something in the 15-22 story range in the Brewery District so that would be awesome. 

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2 minutes ago, cbussoccer said:

 

Oh wow. I never thought we would get something in the 15-22 story range in the Brewery District so that would be awesome. 

Let's hope one day High Street is lined with 15-22 story buildings to spite German Villagers.

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3 hours ago, aderwent said:

Let's hope one day High Street is lined with 15-22 story buildings to spite German Villagers.

This unfortunately is on Front, but I agree

 

Not as a direct reply but 500 S Front is 12 stories; 15 would fit in right across the street.

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Placing this under Brewery District because it falls under the Brewery District Commission but please move if there is a better thread.

 

Looks like a North Carolina developer is teaming up with NBBJ and CSX to propose a 4-phase development in a rather unique piece of land on the edge of the Brewery District. 

The CU article goes into how the project is aiming to be built out in 10-15 years across 4 phases with office, residential, commercial, and parking. Phase 1 would include a 7 story and a 12 story structure containing 350+ apartments. Future phases and a massing provided to the BDC show the possibility of the site supporting up to a 30 story building (probably targeting skyline, river, and park views). The article is linked below. 

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/large-development-proposed-for-whittier-peninsula-bw1

 

brewery-district-development-01-1150x550.thumb.jpg.9c83add4c56e5f9863dcdff6d6f6af1f.jpg

 

While I am shocked by the scale of the proposal, there have been multiple engineering and permits working their way through the system for weeks now regarding the site. The NC developer has a heavy portfolio in the Triangle and seems to be growing their urban portfolio in recent years with a highrise proposal in Downtown Raleigh. Anyway, the continuation of outside developers taking leaps into the market is a good sign. 

 

 

Edited by DevolsDance
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17 minutes ago, DevolsDance said:

shocked by the scale of the proposal

 

17 minutes ago, DevolsDance said:

outside developers taking leaps into the market is a good sign.

Is this it, guys?  Are the boom times finally here?  2020 and beyond is shaping up to be a lot of fun for us development enthusiasts.

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6 hours ago, DevolsDance said:

Anyway, the continuation of outside developers taking leaps into the market is a good sign. 

 

This times 100. It's been said here by many that outside investment is what's going to push developers up and into better design. (Generally. Certainly not in all cases ie. King and High) 

 

A couple of my thoughts. 

 

- I've long wanted the remaining non-park buildings on the peninsula to be razed and added to the restoration of the land.  However, that was before something like this was imagined. 

 

- I hope the warehouse can still be razed and this vision continued to 70. 

 

- Scioto Audubon should be better protected in statute that no public land be lost to private development. I'm not going to subscribe to a slippery slope in this case but I do want greater assurances the city wont see a money making opportunity and sell of any portions of the metro park. 

 

- it is encouraging the developer has stated they have a contractual agreement with the railroad it seems. Still a bit of hesitation given the history of railroad easements etc but it seems it much more concrete than the former proposal in the arena district on railroad land. 

 

- I'm glad to see the mound road underpass being included. That needed to be restored anyway. If only we could get the overpass restored for pedestrian only use as part of this plan. (But it doesn't fit into odots vision so down it will go)

 

 

Edited by DTCL11
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This is awesome! Hopefully we can see it all come to fruition and actually get a tower around the 30 floor range.

 

Given the way things are developing downtown and in the immediate surrounding areas, the views driving along 670 and 70 through downtown are going to be very cool and different in a few years (assuming this happens). Along 670 you have the White Castle development, Crew Stadium, the expanding Arena District, the Short North's "mini skyline", the ever expanding Convention Center developments, and Jeffrey Park's coming mid-rise all working together to provide a much more urban feel to the route. Along 70, you have the coming River & Rich 12-story building, this planned development with buildings potentially reaching 30 floors, the Hoster Brewery redevelopment project which is rumored to include mid to high rise elements in future phases, and the ever growing Children's Hospital campus all working together to increase the urban feel along the route. Exciting times for sure!

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1 hour ago, DevolsDance said:

Placing this under Brewery District because it falls under the Brewery District Commission but please move if there is a better thread.

 

Looks like a North Carolina developer is teaming up with NBBJ and CSX to propose a 4-phase development in a rather unique piece of land on the edge of the Brewery District. 

The CU article goes into how the project is aiming to be built out in 10-15 years across 4 phases with office, residential, commercial, and parking. Phase 1 would include a 7 story and a 12 story structure containing 350+ apartments. Future phases and a massing provided to the BDC show the possibility of the site supporting up to a 30 story building (probably targeting skyline, river, and park views). The article is linked below. 

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/large-development-proposed-for-whittier-peninsula-bw1

 

brewery-district-development-01-1150x550.thumb.jpg.9c83add4c56e5f9863dcdff6d6f6af1f.jpg

 

While I am shocked by the scale of the proposal, there have been multiple engineering and permits working their way through the system for weeks now regarding the site. The NC developer has a heavy portfolio in the Triangle and seems to be growing their urban portfolio in recent years with a highrise proposal in Downtown Raleigh. Anyway, the continuation of outside developers taking leaps into the market is a good sign. 

 

 

 

If this was a Columbus developer, I would basically say the time scale by itself, let alone the size, would probably ensure it wouldn't happen, but since it's not, I have hope.  I've long been saying that the lack of national developers is preventing us from getting more large-scale development projects, especially ones that get past proposal stages, because I don't think we have very many locals could do something like this.  Wish they were doing the 30-story first, though!  

Edited by jonoh81

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38 minutes ago, DTCL11 said:

 

 

This times 100. It's been said here by many that outside investment is what's going to push developers up and into better design. (Generally. Certainly not in all cases ie. King and High) 

 

A couple of my thoughts. 

 

- I've long wanted the remaining non-park buildings on the peninsula to he raised and added to the restoration of the land.  However, that was before something like this was imagined. 

 

- I hope the warehouse can still he razed and this vision continued to 70. 

 

- Scioto Audubon should be better protected in statute that no public land be lost to private development. I'm not going to subscribe to a slippery slope in this case but I do want greater assurances the city wont see a money making opportunity and sell of any portions of the metro park. 

 

- it is encouraging the developer has stated they have a contractual agreement with the railroad it seems. Still a bit of hesitation given the history of railroad easements etc but it seems it much more concrete than the former proposal in the arena district on railroad land. 

 

- I'm glad to see the mound road underpass being included. That needed to be restored anyway. If only we could get the overpass restored for pedestrian only use as part of this plan. (But it doesn't fit into odots vision so down it will go)

 

 

 

Has there ever been an instance that Columbus sold off existing Metro Park land for development?  The quarry park in development on the West Side might be the closest to that, but it wasn't an existing park.

Edited by jonoh81

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2 hours ago, DevolsDance said:

Placing this under Brewery District because it falls under the Brewery District Commission but please move if there is a better thread.

 

Looks like a North Carolina developer is teaming up with NBBJ and CSX to propose a 4-phase development in a rather unique piece of land on the edge of the Brewery District. 

The CU article goes into how the project is aiming to be built out in 10-15 years across 4 phases with office, residential, commercial, and parking. Phase 1 would include a 7 story and a 12 story structure containing 350+ apartments. Future phases and a massing provided to the BDC show the possibility of the site supporting up to a 30 story building (probably targeting skyline, river, and park views). The article is linked below. 

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/large-development-proposed-for-whittier-peninsula-bw1

 

brewery-district-development-01-1150x550.thumb.jpg.9c83add4c56e5f9863dcdff6d6f6af1f.jpg

 

While I am shocked by the scale of the proposal, there have been multiple engineering and permits working their way through the system for weeks now regarding the site. The NC developer has a heavy portfolio in the Triangle and seems to be growing their urban portfolio in recent years with a highrise proposal in Downtown Raleigh. Anyway, the continuation of outside developers taking leaps into the market is a good sign. 

 

 

I love it! Would love to see the tallest one sooner I will admit. But this is great news!!!  I would also like to see something stretch down from 70 between short street and the railroad...so close to Front/High/German Village/Kroger. Such an opportunity even if it is just like an extended version of Brewers Yard.

 

How does Mound connect to the new street at the tracks? I know the new street will go under 70, but will the Mound attachment be at grade, or an underpass or what? The street connections will be great also for anyone wanting to access the park.

 

*I counted 32 floors...just saying and all... 😉

Edited by Toddguy

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Definitely excited for this, didn't think this area would get developed for a long time.  Will help add a little more oomph to brewery district and GV area.  Agree with toddguy and dtcl, great to see how this probably benefits the surrounding area and infrastructure.  Wonder if it can somehow help the forsaken south franklinton even.  

Edited by ck
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13 hours ago, jonoh81 said:

 

Has there ever been an instance that Columbus sold off existing Metro Park land for development?  The quarry park in development on the West Side might be the closest to that, but it wasn't an existing park.

 

Has there ever been an interest for such development next to an existing metropark? It's not whether a precedent has been set, but preventing one. Like I said, chances are slim but city leadership can change, priorities can change, a sale can be more attractive at some point. I'd rather have a bit of added protection. Lord knows city council passes plenty of frivolous, symbolic resolutions that they could afford to spend a bit of time to protect it. 

 

Edited by DTCL11

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3 hours ago, ck said:

Definitely excited for this, didn't think this area would get developed for a long time.  Will help add a little more oomph to brewery district and GV area.  Agree with toddguy and dtcl, great to see how this probably benefits the surrounding area and infrastructure.  Wonder if it can somehow help the forsaken south franklinton even.  

I seriously expected something eventually along the tracks on the other side near Kroger but never expected anything on this tract of land. In fact I did not know even know it was not park of the park-I thought the warehouse/turned office building plot was the only part that was not part of the park. This is a complete and utter surprise for me-and in a very sweet way!

Edited by Toddguy

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Multiple towers proposed for 17-acre Brewery District site

 

An out-of-state developer wants to build a multi-tower mixed-use development in the Brewery District.

 

Wilmington, North Carolina-based Zimmer Development Co. has submitted early plans to the city for a project on a 17-acre plot of undeveloped land on the Whittier Peninsula, near the Scioto Audubon Metro Park.

 

In a statement, the developer said the project would occur in phases but is very early in the planning process. It's working with architect NBBJ on the site.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/12/02/multiple-towers-proposedfor-17-acre-brewery.html


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10 hours ago, DTCL11 said:

 

Has there ever been an interest for such development next to an existing metropark? It's not whether a precedent has been set, but preventing one. Like I said, chances are slim but city leadership can change, priorities can change, a sale can be more attractive at some point. I'd rather have a bit of added protection. Lord knows city council passes plenty of frivolous, symbolic resolutions that they could afford to spend a bit of time to protect it. 

 

 

Keep in mind Metro Parks are a wholly separate government entity from the City of Columbus. Metro Parks primary mission is to conserve open space. There is already language in the Ohio Revised Code adding some protections for land that has been acquired by Metro Parks - see ORC 1545

Edited by .justin

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37 minutes ago, .justin said:

 

Keep in mind Metro Parks are wholly separate government entity from the City of Columbus. Metro Parks primary mission is to conserve open space. There is already language in the Ohio Revised Code protecting land that has been acquired by Metro Parks - see ORC 1545

 

1545.12 states that the board can sell the land at their will. There is a public process for offering the sale of the land but if the board ever decides that land is no longer needed for preservation purposes or there is a greater public interest, they can get rid of it. There is nothing that actually prevents sale. It just outlines the process for sale, most notably that it has to be offered to public entities (city, county, state) first before going to public sale. If the public entities don't want it, it goes up for market value. Then, they get to decide which bid is 'in the best public interest' which to some, is a project like this. Like I said, it's all a matter of leadership and priorities can change. The best public interest could be millions of dollars for land to fund a general fund or park expansion elsewhere at the expense of this park. Honestly, it would most likely affect the lower portions close to 70 including the dog park, mowed field, etc. Again, it's not about now, it's about who may be leaders in the future. 

 

Edit: under the 1545 statute, Summit Metroparks just sold off 140 acres 'in the public interest' for light manufacturing becuase the county lacked sufficient land zoned for light manufacturing. The land was previously acquired in 2016 but since, the park has acquired other lands it would rather spend time and money on and use the value of the 140 acres to achieve goals elsewhere. 

Edited by DTCL11

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51 minutes ago, DTCL11 said:

 

1545.12 states that the board can sell the land at their will. There is a public process for offering the sale of the land but if the board ever decides that land is no longer needed for preservation purposes or there is a greater public interest, they can get rid of it. There is nothing that actually prevents sale. It just outlines the process for sale, most notably that it has to be offered to public entities (city, county, state) first before going to public sale. If the public entities don't want it, it goes up for market value. Then, they get to decide which bid is 'in the best public interest' which to some, is a project like this. Like I said, it's all a matter of leadership and priorities can change. The best public interest could be millions of dollars for land to fund a general fund or park expansion elsewhere at the expense of this park. Honestly, it would most likely affect the lower portions close to 70 including the dog park, mowed field, etc. Again, it's not about now, it's about who may be leaders in the future. 

 

Edit: under the 1545 statute, Summit Metroparks just sold off 140 acres 'in the public interest' for light manufacturing becuase the county lacked sufficient land zoned for light manufacturing. The land was previously acquired in 2016 but since, the park has acquired other lands it would rather spend time and money on and use the value of the 140 acres to achieve goals elsewhere. 

 

What further protections do you suggest? Couldn't any protections passed by the city council, the Metro Parks board, or anyone else be overturned in the future if leaders change and priorities shift?

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14 minutes ago, .justin said:

 

What further protections do you suggest? Couldn't any protections passed by the city council, the Metro Parks board, or anyone else be overturned in the future if leaders change and priorities shift?

 

Additional measures could be codified to stipulate how or why land can be sold. Rather than leaving it solely at the hands of the board, it could be transferred to public referendum or sale must be reviewed by multiple entities etc.  While ultimately, a sale may not be 100% avoided, it can be made much more difficult to achieve. There may also be some value in utilizing partnerships with other organizations and land trusts to add an additional layer of protection. As is, it just seems that a single group of people needs to agree and it's done. 

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If the worry is that Scioto Audubon is potentially threatened by future development, that seems extremely unlikely.  It's a very popular park, and the fact that the adjacent location is getting a large development might actually further ensure that it doesn't go anywhere.  For the businesses and residents of this project, the next-door park will be a huge amenity and possibly part of this reason this location was even chosen.  IMO, it's completely safe.  

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34 minutes ago, jonoh81 said:

If the worry is that Scioto Audubon is potentially threatened by future development, that seems extremely unlikely.  It's a very popular park, and the fact that the adjacent location is getting a large development might actually further ensure that it doesn't go anywhere.  For the businesses and residents of this project, the next-door park will be a huge amenity and possibly part of this reason this location was even chosen.  IMO, it's completely safe.  

 

Agreed, Columbus knows what it has and it's something very unique, no way that the city would break up their "greenbelt" along the river for apartments, they've invested too much and I think they understand what it means for quality of life in the city.  And a good quality of life means more residents to collect taxes on moving forward and high net worth ones at that!

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38 minutes ago, wpcc88 said:

 

Agreed, Columbus knows what it has and it's something very unique, no way that the city would break up their "greenbelt" along the river for apartments, they've invested too much and I think they understand what it means for quality of life in the city.  And a good quality of life means more residents to collect taxes on moving forward and high net worth ones at that!

 

I will refer to my original comment where I indicate chances are slim but it doesn't hurt to better protect it. Even in my first comment, I said to take it to 70 thinking there was more untapped room between the dog park and railroad track but to take it to 70 would remove said dog park and field. I'd have to revise my Initial though on that. The argument will come down to whether the dog park and field are actually 'preservation' or untapped potential that would in fact create a uniform swath of development on the peninsula. There is a case for both and I'm not sure even preservationist will bring out the pitchforks and torches for a dog park. We will see but this has to make it to fruition and I believe the fate of the warehouse will ultimately decide what pressure is put on that particular block abutting 70. 

 

And I doubt we will be collecting taxes on more residents, let alone high net worth. The city would have to move forward with it's new tax abatement guidelines and so far, it hasn't. I would guess that this will easily sail through an abatement process. And with such a long time frame, I would bet money on extensions at some point. 

Edited by DTCL11

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26 minutes ago, wpcc88 said:

 

Agreed, Columbus knows what it has and it's something very unique, no way that the city would break up their "greenbelt" along the river for apartments, they've invested too much and I think they understand what it means for quality of life in the city.  And a good quality of life means more residents to collect taxes on moving forward and high net worth ones at that!

I think for greenspace so close to downtown the torches and pitchforks would be out for taking away parkland-it would be extremely unpopular on a widespread scale and I think they not only understand what it means for quality of life but also for their job longevity.  Once it is officially parkland people think of it as "ours" and that is very tough to overcome IMO.

 

*Also you just know that this will include restaurant space which will be popular for anyone visiting the park.

Edited by Toddguy
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31 minutes ago, DTCL11 said:

 

I will refer to my original comment where I indicate chances are slim but it doesn't hurt to better protect it. Even in my first comment, I said to take it to 70 thinking there was more untapped room between the dog park and railroad track but to take it to 70 would remove said dog park and field. I'd have to revise my Initial though on that. The argument will come down to whether the dog park and field are actually 'preservation' or untapped potential that would in fact create a uniform swath of development on the peninsula. There is a case for both and I'm not sure even preservationist will bring out the pitchforks and torches for a dog park. We will see but this has to make it to fruition and I believe the fate of the warehouse will ultimately decide what pressure is put on that particular block abutting 70. 

 

And I doubt we will be collecting taxes on more residents, let alone high net worth. The city would have to move forward with it's new tax abatement guidelines and so far, it hasn't. I would guess that this will easily sail through an abatement process. And with such a long time frame, I would bet money on extensions at some point. 

 

I should've tamed my language just a little, but I was speaking of the core neighborhoods in Columbus both now and into the future.  It is a safe bet that at minimum the households living in Short North, German Village and Downtown for the most part are all six figure earners, whether it's individuals or couples. While not the super rich it does mean more tax dollars for the city, even more so than true high net worth individuals. But in context even they bring in more dollars for the city via property taxes, restaurants, services, etc.

 

This is a very unique situation but I think the core of the park is not going to be at risk was my main point.  The dog park for example could easily be relocated.

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32 minutes ago, Toddguy said:

I think for greenspace so close to downtown the torches and pitchforks would be out for taking away parkland-it would be extremely unpopular on a widespread scale and I think they not only understand what it means for quality of life but also for their job longevity.  Once it is officially parkland people think of it as "ours" and that is very tough to overcome IMO.

 

*Also you just know that this will include restaurant space which will be popular for anyone visiting the park.

 

The comment section on CU's facebook page is what drew me to finally comment on here, because those people are out in full force(despite some of them living in far exurbs).  The best comment in my opinion was someone pointing out the river renovations that added a ton more greenspace to the inner city.  This is in retrospect taking a VERY small sliver of our greenspace away.  Mentioning restaurants makes me think that they will make the park even more popular and this development a win-win for all.  

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As a bit of an aside, I've always thought the area North of Greenlawn was ripe for development like this with a pedestrian and bike connector to audubon via Maier and Deckenbach (of course we are still waiting on one from the Scioto peninsula to the Arena District so it's quite a pipe dream). Perhaps if this is successful, we could see that in the future. The waterfront and skyline view potential is great here as well. Now, it is behind the flood wall, but I believe this Whittier peninsula project is also in the designated flood plain.  

 

 

20191203_125020.jpg

Edited by DTCL11

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3 minutes ago, DTCL11 said:

As a bit of an aside, I've always thought the area North of Greenlawn was ripe for development like this with a pedestrian and bike connector to audubon via Maier and Deckenbach (of course we are still waiting on one from the Scioto peninsula to the Arena District so it's quite a pipe dream). Perhaps if this is successful, we could see that in the future. The waterfront and skyline view potential is great here as well. Now, it is behind the flood wall, but I believe this Whittier peninsula project is also in the designated flood plain.  

Screenshot_20191203-123914_Maps.jpg

 

 

That strip has always intrigued me as well, businesses seem to struggle at that bar.  I think it needs a complete overhaul, a lot of brownfield closer into the interstate though.  That again could easily be bumped to the other side as there is a ton of industrial in that corridor.  I would think hotels and a mixed use development would be successful here due to it's proximity to the Villages on the southside.  I would think a re-imagined version of Lennox would be appropriate and successful here.  

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55 minutes ago, wpcc88 said:

 

The comment section on CU's facebook page is what drew me to finally comment on here, because those people are out in full force(despite some of them living in far exurbs).  The best comment in my opinion was someone pointing out the river renovations that added a ton more greenspace to the inner city.  This is in retrospect taking a VERY small sliver of our greenspace away.  Mentioning restaurants makes me think that they will make the park even more popular and this development a win-win for all.  

Are they actually taking any official greenspace(as in part of any park)away? I thought it was railroad land and the entire part of it is just now scrubland with some trees and is completely undeveloped?  Even the road additions don't seem like they are taking anything away?

 

Also if this whole thing gets developed(all four parts)I find it hard to believe that the one story warehouse and that whole property will remain as is-with all of that they would almost have to redevelop it more densely it seems.

 

I wonder if they would possibly eventually make an eastward extension street to overpass the tracks and tie into maybe Liberty street or Short street somehow? At the very least a pedestrian/bikeway? With the first phase at 350-400 units and 3 more phases after that this will(if it all pans out of course, this is Cbus we are talking about 😉 )  *have to have over 1,000 units and I would think they would want a more direct connection to Kroger and the rest of the Brewery District even if bike/pedestrian only. 

 

 

*Thank God there is no Schottenstein name attached to this!!!!!  And yeah I took a peek at the CU Facerant..Facebook page just to see the outrage.

 

Edited by Toddguy
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