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<b>Franklinton revitalization project sits idle</b>

<i>Troubled L.A. developer assures city it's still a go</i>

Sunday,  March 23, 2008 3:52 AM

BY ROBERT VITALE, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Something's growing on W. Town Street -- a tree, through the floor of a crumbling factory building that Columbus officials touted last year as the showcase of a Franklinton revival.  Nearly a year after Mayor Michael B. Coleman announced a $23 million privately funded project to turn land around the former B&T Metals plant into loft condos and apartments, town houses, gallery space and a small theater, little has changed in the three-block area west of Downtown.

 

Pc0161400.jpg

 

Read more at http://dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/03/23/robbins.ART_ART_03-23-08_B1_V69NM89.html?sid=101

 

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Franklinton group builds home, fulfills mother's dream

Wednesday, April 30, 2008 - 3:16 AM

By Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Not too long ago, Karen Drake's dream of buying a house was set far in the future.  She would wait until after her 9-year-old daughter, Ambrosia Jennings, graduated from college.  Then, maybe, she'd treat herself to a small house.  Some day.  Yesterday, Drake talked about being the owner of one of the few new houses to be built in Franklinton in the past 50 years as community leaders try to boost homeownership in a poor neighborhood filled with renters.  The two-story house at 40 Martin Ave. just south of W. Broad Street is one of three the nonprofit Franklinton Development Association is building in the neighborhood.  The two others will be at 102 Dakota Ave. and 1204 W. State St.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/04/30/FRANKHOUSE.ART_ART_04-30-08_B1_GHA2MTP.html?sid=101

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Ambrosia (food of the gods) Jennings?  Why do parents do this to their children?  That girl is going to grow up to work in the sex industry for sure.  Why not just name the poor girl Breakfast of Champions Jennings?

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Developer might get $750,000 from state

Metal plant to become housing, art space

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

By Mike Pramik, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

An out-of-state developer is in line to receive $750,000 to clean up an abandoned metals plant, one step in the possible transformation of the Franklinton site into residences, gallery space and a theater.  The money, from the Ohio Department of Development, would be used by Brick Investments of California as part of a $23 million renovation of B&T Metals, 425 W. Town St., a former uranium extrusion plant.

 

The Columbus City Council was scheduled to accept the Clean Ohio Assistance Fund grant on behalf of the developer next week, but the state wants more information about the project, said Eileen Turner, spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Development.

 

Read more at http://dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/01/28/robbins.ART_ART_01-28-09_B1_V70NM90.html?sid=101

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<a href="http://www.columbusunderground.com/cu-podcast-episode-10-whats-new-in-franklinton">CU Podcast Episode #10: What’s New in Franklinton</a>

 

<img src="http://www.columbusunderground.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/franklinton.png">

 

In this week's podcast we sit down for a chat with Jim Sweeney and Reza Reyazi with the <a href="http://franklinton.org/">Franklinton Development Association</a> to discuss a variety of projects and developments in the Franklinton neighborhood. Jim & Reza discuss some of the history of this area, the challenges it faces in being revitalized, and several new initiatives including the conversion of an old church into a community space and the development of a new central park for Franklinton residents.

 

Click <a href="http://blip.tv/file/get/ColumbusUnderground-ColumbusUndergroundcomPodcastEpisode10634.mp3">here</a> to download an mp3, click <a href="http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=301024381">here</a> to subscribe via iTunes, or click <a href="http://columbusunderground.blip.tv/rss">here</a> to subscribe to the rss feed.

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FRANKLINTON

Public-housing complex, rec center to be gone by fall

Friday,  May 8, 2009 - 3:01 AM

By Rita Price, The Columbus Dispatch

 

Heavy equipment sits in the parking lot at Sunshine Annex, ready to dismantle a big piece of the public-housing complex that has dominated McDowell Street for more than 40 years.  The Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority expects demolition of the 129-unit building and the adjacent McDowell Recreation Center to be completed by the end of September.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatchpolitics.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/05/08/DEMOLISH.ART_ART_05-08-09_B5_UQDQ370.html?adsec=politics&sid=101

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Those housing projects are really bad. I'm glad they're tearing them down. They're like the the old Sullivant Gardens projects.

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Friday, May 15, 2009

<b>Redeveloper of Franklinton's B&T Metals site lands grant</b>

Business First of Columbus - by Brian R. Ball

 

<img src="http://assets.bizjournals.com/story_image/241665-0-0-1.jpg">

 

A Los Angeles developer has dusted off plans for 132 condominiums and artists’ lofts in Franklinton after landing a grant to clean up an industrial site.  The Ohio Department of Development awarded $750,000 in Clean Ohio Assistance Funds to Smart Urban Growth LLC to remediate the B&T Metals Co. and neighboring Eickholt Glass Inc. properties.  Principal Lance Robbins said demolition of the buildings in the worst condition will begin this summer as part of a cleanup that could take a year.

 

Pending a thaw in credit markets, construction on the first 30 units could begin in mid-2010. “We want to make it the funky arts district that the Short North was before it became gentrified,” Robbins said.  “This project will serve as a catalyst for the rebirth of the once vibrant Franklinton area of Columbus,” Mark Barbash, interim director of the Ohio Department of Development, wrote in a letter to Columbus City Council, which will funnel the money to Smart Urban Growth.  The grant is the second for the project.  It qualified for a $174,800 Clean Ohio Assistance Fund grant two years ago to subsidize testing for industrial contaminants.

 

READ MORE: http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2009/05/18/story2.html?b=1242619200^1829124

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Good news!  This developer has been talking about redeveloping this site for a while.  Maybe this clean-up grant is the prelude to this project moving forward because the rendering looks great.  This project plus the demolition of the Sunshine public housing bode well for Franklinton.

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URBAN SCRAWL III

Featuring Live Art, Bands and DJs, Skateboarding Competition, Bike Polo, Art/Craft Vendors, Interactive Art Making, and Food Court

Saturday, AUG 29, 2009

at Dodge Park in Franklinton

(667 Sullivant Ave)

 

 

hangingcrum5pr2.jpg

 

urbanscrawltripanelzq78.jpg

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Tax credits in hand, NRP Group sets sights on housing for Franklinton

Business First of Columbus - by Brian R. Ball

Friday, August 7, 2009

 

Cleveland-based NRP Group LLC is planning to build affordable housing in Franklinton after landing state tax credits to encourage the work.  The developer plans to build a $9 million, 54-unit senior housing project on West Town Street near the Mount Carmel West hospital campus.  Construction on the four-story building could begin early next year.  NRP also will work with the city of Columbus and Franklinton Development Association to identify scattered redevelopment sites for single-family houses that residents can rent to own.

 

Aaron Pechota, NRP vice president of development, likened Franklinton to the Cleveland neighborhood of Tremont, which has also deteriorated from a lack of community investment.  Completion of a floodwall made Franklinton more attractive for redevelopment, even as the Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority begins implementing plans to demolish and rebuild public housing in the neighborhood.

 

274341-0-0-1.jpg

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2009/08/10/story10.html

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Aaron Pechota, NRP vice president of development, likened Franklinton to the Cleveland neighborhood of Tremont, which has also deteriorated from a lack of community investment.

 

WTF?

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Aaron Pechota, NRP vice president of development, likened Franklinton to the Cleveland neighborhood of Tremont, which has also deteriorated from a lack of community investment.

 

WTF?

 

Maybe the NRP guy was referring to a pre-gentrified Tremont?  Or maybe he got misquoted in the article?

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From http://www.columbusunderground.com/urban-scrawl-iii-takes-place-this-saturday

 

Urban Scrawl III Takes Place This Saturday

 

If Franklinton founder Lucas Sullivant could travel 200 years into the future to see Urban Scrawl III, it might knock the powder out of his colonial wig.  Skateboarding.  Breakdancing.  Vegan hot dogs.  Hip Hop.  Graffiti.  But all these artists share a common goal with Sullivant: creating a vibrant Franklinton.

 

Franklinton—long considered one of the most depressed areas of central Columbus—is beginning to show signs of life and color.  And Urban Scrawl is a driving force behind that effort.

 

Murals and artwork from past Urban Scrawls have been hung on buildings around Franklinton, said Nikos Fyodor Rutkowski, Urban Scrawl founder and president of the Franklinton Arts District.  The artwork creates an aesthetic counterpoint to the neighborhood’s blight, Rutkowski said.

 

“It adds color where there wasn’t any,” said Jim Sweeney, Executive Director of the Franklinton Development Association.  “It’s amazing to see the changes. Hats off to Urban Scrawl.”

 

Urban Scrawl III, will be held from noon to 8 p.m. at Franklinton’s Dodge Park, 667 Sullivant Ave., on Sat. Aug. 29.  The event will feature 30 prominent local artists working live; a skate boarding competition; breakdancers; food vendors; a beer truck; and live music from members of the Columbus Music Co-op.

 

3865830968_93aed16038.jpg

 

More at http://www.franklintonartsdistrict.org/

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TOUR OF HOMES

Franklinton group developing neighborhood, reputation

Thursday,  October 1, 2009

By Mark Ferenchik, The Columbus Dispatch

 

The Tour of Franklinton Homes this weekend, organizers say, is a celebration of efforts to turn around one of Columbus' poorest neighborhoods and of one of the groups working to transform it.  The nonprofit Franklinton Development Association was named last week as the top development group by a state development association.  To Jim Sweeney, that means his association's renovation efforts are paying off.

 

But it's a slow process.  The area long known as the Bottoms still wrestles with crime, poverty and deteriorating housing.  The Franklinton Development Association wants to highlight some bright spots -- 10 houses and an arts space -- this weekend.

 

Full story at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/10/01/FRANKLINTON.ART_ART_10-01-09_B1_VKF870N.html?sid=101

 

Graphic: Map of the Franklinton home tour

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East Franklinton clearly has the most potential. The neighborhood has quite a few great assets that a lot of people tend to overlook. Tommy's diner is a landmark; the Mt. Carmel hospital has a College of Nursing and provides a huge employment base; then there's the Florentine and Spaghetti Warehouse. It's a shame the business district is so fragmented due to excessove parking lots but maybe it will turn out to be a blessing in disguise as it provides a blank slate for new building types. If you drive through the neighborhood you will notice quite a few quality infill projects and rehabs near the hospital.

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Depends whether East Franklinton is east of 315 or the railroad tracks. The FDA has been renovating and building brand new homes on vacant lots. There are a good number of quality, inexpensive homes. The area just across from Downtown is mostly empty aside from COSI and Vet's, especially with the last set of projects to be torn down soon on the SE side across from Dodge Park. I don't think Broad is too broken up by parking lots. There's enough there for some quality businesses to fill in and attract visitors from other parts of the city. Take the cluster of restaurants on Broad between N Hartford and Rodgers as an example. Sure, there are quite a few parking lots, but all of them are easily reachable by foot. If there were more businesses filled in further west, the same could be said for them. Hell, just look at the potmarked stretch of Parsons in OTE. Sure, there are some big lots that can use some infill, but you have to admit that with less buildings it's easier and faster to renovate.

 

So what does Franklinton need? A good neighborhood bar. One that attracts a clientele that isn't into hole-in-the-wall, foreboding, windowless bars. Although the neighborhood did just get a new Mexican restaurant to add onto Franklinton's restaurant row.

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^An activist base of parents to take back one or more of the schools would help, too. The frontage on Broad Street IS amazingly intact in Franklinton. Maybe some sexy-type above-the-stores loft development might spark some nice things through there retail-wise.

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Agreed. Residents actually have to care if there are to be any sort of improvements. There are young professionals moving into the area, particularly those that have been renovated or built anew through the Home Again program by the FDA (Franklinton Development Association). Among them are award-winning documentary filmmakers from Canada, so yes people are noticing the changes going on here.

 

One of the Republican candidates for City Council bashed this program as an "utter failure" for being implemented in the "slums", which obviously shows he doesn't get out much since he considers Franklinton a slum. Of course, people are buying these homes and there have been noticeable improvements on a number of residential streets, so it's hardly a failure as the above article can attest. I went on both home tours and liked what I saw (pics coming soon). Of course, there are rough spots around the neighborhood, but it's nothing like the Republican fear-mongers would have you believe.

 

If the FDA can attract just a handful of committed entrepreneurs to open some quality businesses, that alone would do wonders. After all, wasn't retail in the Short North the priority while residential streets caught up one by one? That seems to be my impression since it seems easier to open a destination or two rather than first wait for home buyers to turn around entire residential streets in the proximity.

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Funding set for senior housing

54-unit complex near Mount Carmel West to offer affordable rent for low-income elderly

Saturday,  March 20, 2010 - 2:52 AM

By Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Construction on a 54-unit apartment complex for low-income senior citizens in Franklinton will begin in a few months.  Proximity to Mount Carmel West hospital, which is just north of the project site, will be a selling point for the $9.2 million, four-story Franklinton Senior apartments at W. Rich and S. Green streets, said Aaron Pechota, vice president of development for developer NRP Group of Cleveland.

 

The project will be financed with $1.8 million in federal stimulus money in a tax-credit exchange and $500,000 in housing development assistance money that the Ohio Housing Finance Agency's board approved this week.  It also will be financed with $845,000 in tax credits and $250,000 in city money, said Sean Thomas, the agency's director of planning, preservation and development.  Investors are providing $5.6 million in equity in exchange for the credits, Thomas said, adding that the agency has not financed an apartment project like this in Franklinton.

 

The project should begin by late spring and be open by next summer, Pechota said.

 

FULL ARTICLE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/03/20/funding-set-for-senior-housing.html?sid=101

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Holy intentions for an old car lot

West Side Catholic church is looking to a former Ford dealership as a new soup kitchen and museum

Saturday,  May 22, 2010

By Rita Price, The Columbus Dispatch

 

Before the site became a car dealership, the ground at 707 W. Broad St. was home to the Convent of the Good Shepherd.  Rev. Kevin Lutz, pastor of Holy Family Catholic Church, hopes to put it back in church hands by purchasing the old Graham Ford dealership which closed in November 2008.

 

Lutz and others at Holy Family envision an elegant makeover.  They say the church could create a Catholic cultural center to house its Jubilee Museum, have plenty of room for events and provide a new home for the Holy Family soup kitchen.  It carries an asking price of more than $4 million, so Holy Family would have to raise money.  The church has received permission from the Ford Leasing Co. to hold a banquet - a fundraiser for the soup kitchen and the religious-artifacts museum - in the old showroom on June 19, Lutz said.

 

Carol Stewart, head of the Franklinton Area Commission, said an extensive church development would be great for the area.  Holy Family has long shown its commitment to Franklinton, she said.  The church is at 584 W. Broad St., down the street from the Graham site, and its museum and soup kitchen are nearby in an old school building at 57 S. Grubb St. that is cramped and not accessible to people in wheelchairs.

 

MAP OF GRAHAM FORD SITE AND HOLY FAMILY CHURCH LOCATION

 

Full article: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/05/22/holy-intentions-for-an-old-car-lot.html?sid=101

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Interesting article about the Franklinton neighborhood.  And from The Other Paper too!  How about that?

 

Franklinton in flux

Can a mixture of entrepreneurship, new housing and artistic creativity revive the neighborhood?

By Steph Greegor, The Other Paper

Published: Thursday, June 10, 2010 - 3:13 PM EDT

 

When people in Central Ohio talk about how art can spur economic growth, the Short North is the first place they point to.  A group of talented painters, sculptors, sketchers and musicians is credited with giving the eclectic neighborhood some street cred that ultimately translated into cash flow from the deep pockets of local investors and a surge in residential ownership.  Franklinton Development Association executive director Jim Sweeney has made it no secret that he hopes a similar fate awaits Franklinton, which is using arts and music—as well as local restaurateur Liz Lessner—as lures.

 

Full article: http://theotherpaper.com/articles/2010/06/10/cover_story/doc4c101fdc4716f842647559.txt

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W Broad could be a great place. Hell, if old people have no problem heading out here all the time, how bad can it be? Revitalization is really overdue. Franklinton does not have the violent crime that occurs too often in other neighborhoods and it doesn't look like the commercial buildings on Broad are in bad shape for the most part. It would be a very walkable street if only there were more to walk to.

 

Right now it's a very one note kind of place, since you're likely just here for lunch or dinner and then have to move on elsewhere because there's no coffee shop, decent bar, shopping, etc. The flood wall was addressed a while ago and there's plentiful cheap housing; South Linden prices without having to live in South Linden.

 

And here's a video of the event.

 

http://www.abc6onyourside.com/shared/newsroom/top_stories/videos/wsyx_vid_4806.shtml

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The community needs to turn the area around Mt. Carmel Hospital into a Business Improvement District or Special Improvement District/Community Improvement District or whatever you want to call it. Hospitals can provide a lot of momentum in improving a community for two reasons:

 

1. Hospitals provide a highly-paid, educated, and stable workforce who would prefer to work in close proximity to where they live.

 

2. They could snatch Third Frontier funding or whatever else is out there and create incubators/start-up firms that benefit from doctors, research scientists and manufacturers collaborating and sharing resources that ultimately lead to new patented technology. This is basically what happend with the area around the Cleveland Clinic which has made a lot of progress recently. 

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Their West Side bias is showing. Oh wait.

 

I'm not sure to what extent Mount Carmel is being sought to maximize revitalization efforts, but it's right next to the best part of W Broad that is ripe for some additional businesses. While homes bordering the hospital to the west between Broad and Town are an obvious choice, there are only a few residential streets north of Broad where a concentrated effort would result in a huge makeover that would give a positive impression to visitors. There are only four two-block residential streets here and one block of Scott St and one block of N Hartford, with one side of the street mostly grass aside from just two homes. This area is bordered on the west and north by railroad tracks, to the east by parking lots. 

 

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&q=columbus&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Columbus,+Franklin,+Ohio&gl=us&ei=dCAdTKHfBcL88AbU1_icDA&ved=0CCcQ8gEwAA&ll=39.960239,-83.025506&spn=0.003643,0.012209&t=h&z=17

 

When you take a block-by-block approach in an area with few blocks, sure it won't be done overnight, but it's a hell of a lot more achievable and you get good results faster.

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Their West Side bias is showing. Oh wait.

 

I'm not sure to what extent Mount Carmel is being sought to maximize revitalization efforts, but it's right next to the best part of W Broad that is ripe for some additional businesses. While homes bordering the hospital to the west between Broad and Town are an obvious choice, there are only a few residential streets north of Broad where a concentrated effort would result in a huge makeover that would give a positive impression to visitors. There are only four two-block residential streets here and one block of Scott St and one block of N Hartford, with one side of the street mostly grass aside from just two homes. This area is bordered on the west and north by railroad tracks, to the east by parking lots. 

 

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&q=columbus&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Columbus,+Franklin,+Ohio&gl=us&ei=dCAdTKHfBcL88AbU1_icDA&ved=0CCcQ8gEwAA&ll=39.960239,-83.025506&spn=0.003643,0.012209&t=h&z=17

 

When you take a block-by-block approach in an area with few blocks, sure it won't be done overnight, but it's a hell of a lot more achievable and you get good results faster.

 

I think the houses north of Broad in that area have potential; though they tend to be more bombed out than those south. In general I think the North portion is worse than the southern portion as far as crime and blight. I definitely see a lot of synergy around there though if they truly made an effort, I mean you have Tommy's, Florentine and some other great little places near the hospital. Plus it's a neighborhood where gentrification wouldn't result in a bunch of racial tension (i.e. Olde Towne East). The neighborhood has always been racially mixed.

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Drawing attention to the commercial structures with art combined with fun events is a great way to maximize the function of the murals. Hopefully, more and more people are taking notice to add on to the number of existing businesses. From Hartford to Dana on W Broad that's like ten blocks which could all be walkable if only there were more worth walking to: huge potential as a significant urban business district.

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I'm looking at the latest census population estimates available on Social Explorer (vs. population in the past) for Franklinton. I noticed that (as of the 2007 estimates) the neighborhood is declining in population compared to 2000. I hope the estimate are far off and won't reflect 2010. Even the part of the neighborhood by Mt. Carmel Hospital is losing population according to the map. Maybe some of the recent rehabbing will make a difference. I honestly expected to see population rise or at least stagnate after the 1990 census because of the flood wall.

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As of 2000 (page 76) the neighborhood did see a %4.1 increase in population from 1990, which I'm certain is due in large part to the floodwall. You also have to factor in the fact that a couple of large projects were torn down a little while back on the SE end, which would be the equivalent of several blocks of single family housing. The remaining low-density section 8, which is the scene of semi-regular occurrences of gunshots and drug dealing, is thankfully also going to be torn asunder, but unfortunately will be some other less fortunate neighborhood's future problem.

 

If you're able to look at the population of Franklinton excluding the eastern third, which has little housing anyway, I think you'll get a more accurate picture of the population trend.

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Franklinton ready for its close-up

Business First - by Brian Ball

Saturday, October 16, 2010, 10:24pm EDT

 

The slow but steady drive to improve the housing stock in the Franklinton neighborhood west of downtown continues.  Franklinton leaders were joined by city and county officials to celebrate the demolition of a duplex and a single-family home on West Park Avenue to make way for new single-family homes. 

 

The nonprofit Franklinton Development Association will work with Cleveland-based NRP Group to build the home at 38-40 W. Park Ave., the site of the demolished duplex, and other housing on nearby sites using funds from the federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program.

 

All told, the nonprofit association and NRP Group will build 32 new homes and renovate eight more through their ongoing, scattered-site Boulevard Homes project funded in part through $500,000 in the federal funds.  The project focuses on affordable housing for those with moderate incomes.

 

MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2010/10/franklinton_ready_for_its_close-up.html

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From streetview, the duplex and single family home doesn't look like they're in bad shape, but at least some nice homes will be there regardless. While I'm glad that the residential streets are getting fixed up I wish more attention was brought to the nearby commercial district which has many empty storefronts, which if filled, would give a great reason for lots more residents to move in to these new and rehabbed homes. Also hope that as the name suggests that these dozens of new homes will be built in a smaller, focused area (along Dakota and W Park) to ensure this effort will have a greater effect on the immediate area and spread from there.

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Volunteers to dig into log cabin's history

Saturday, November 27, 2010

By Wesley Lowery

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

As many as 50 volunteers will brave winter weather and take to their hands and knees next weekend in a search for pieces of central Ohio's history.  On Dec. 4 and 5, makeshift archaeological investigators will descend on the Deardurff House, a 193-year-old log house in the Franklinton neighborhood. 

 

The house, at 72 S. Gift Street, is the oldest known structure in Franklin County still on its original foundation.  It was built in 1807, just four years after Ohio reached statehood.

 

The work is the first step toward the long, complicated restoration of the house.  Although much of the structure remains intact, complete restoration requires lifting most of the house off its foundation for repairs and then setting it back down.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/11/27/volunteers-to-dig-into-log-cabins-history.html?sid=101

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FRANKLINTON LANDMARK

Deardurff House dig offers peek at city's past

Archaeologists search for buried 'treasures' around 1807 log home

Sunday, December 5, 2010 

By Tracy Turner

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

The group of about 20 professional archaeologists, Ohio State University students and history buffs shared a quiet sense of excitement and urgency as each historical find was unearthed yesterday at the Deardurff House, a 193-year-old log house in the Franklinton neighborhood.

 

Walt Reiner, 67, a real-estate agent and property developer from Westerville, authorized the dig as part of his effort to restore the house and turn it into a museum by 2012, in time for Columbus' bicentennial celebration.

 

The restoration will cost at least $400,000, most of which Reiner will pay.  He owns several log buildings in central Ohio, including his realty office, which he converted from a 19th century log cabin.  He said he hopes to turn the Deardurff house's neighborhood into a replica of what Franklinton once looked like.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/12/05/deardurff-house-dig-offers-peek-at-citys-past.html?sid=101

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More about the Deardurff House in Franklinton.  Here are some photos of the 1807 building:

 

Photo circa 1975

5248866957_a4a312eef2_d.jpg

 

Photo circa 2000

5248867067_9942c61916_d.jpg

 

Current photo of the Deardurff House with protective black tarp over the structure

5248867157_489077e8f2_d.jpg

 

Rendering of a restored Deardurff House and surrounding Franklinton neighorhood

5248867237_7c11ffa02c_z_d.jpg

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NBC4 video on Franklinton's efforts to secure funding for rehabbing homes in the neighborhood: 70 so far. And that doesn't include (I don't think) the new builds in the areas. I'm thinking this is why we're just starting to see places choose a Broad St presence and should pave the way for more of a good commercial presence there.

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From Columbus Underground:

 

400 West Rich Brings Art Studios to Franklinton

By Walker | February 10, 2011 - 8:00am

 

Over the past few years, Franklinton has frequently been pitched as a neighborhood that could become “the next Short North” through focused efforts on attracting artists and creatives to relocate into affordable spaces to live and work.  That process has mostly been slow-going, but is about to take a giant leap forward with the official unveiling of the new 400 West Rich Street project.

 

Franklinton resident and freelance contractor Chris Sherman serves as the project manager at 400 West Rich Street and has spearheaded the effort to convert the old warehouse building into new work spaces for local artists.

 

READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/400-west-rich-brings-art-studios-to-franklinton

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In addition to the above article from Columbus Underground, more information on this development can be found in TheMetropreneur.com article: “New Creative, Collaborative Space Forms in Franklinton“

 

The project also has a website at 400WestRich.com.

 

Here are some photos of 400 West Rich Street from their website.  This is only a sample of the project's phototour.  These are smaller versions of the photos available at the website.  Please go to http://400westrich.com/ for larger versions of these photos:

 

100_2960-300x225.jpg  100_2959-300x225.jpg  ChrisSherman1-300x199.jpg

 

Here is a Google Map of project:

400 West Rich Street

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Mr. Sherman is at the forefront of Franklinton revitalization (and throws a mean party). Started out with him buying a small warehouse building for cheap that he was able to turn into a modern living space and since then has worked on numerous neighborhood events like Urban Scrawl and Go West! which are both great fun. There are huge things going on here and it's worth keeping your finger on he pulse of this neighborhood. If you want any insight on the latest there he's the guy to ask.

 

An update on the bike co-op is that they're holding a fundraiser at Hal & Al's next Thursday on the 24th (see: local events).

 

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Franklinton was the first topic of the State of the City Address (excerpts below). A couple of the projects the city is involved in is finally showing that his administration really is paying some attention to the west side (now if we could just see some of that love for the Hilltop too). The demolition of that crack den, err, Section 8 housing (what shootings?) and replacing it with mixed-market rate housing is a huge step for the east side of Franklinton. It was a huge success for Italian Village and I can only imagine the same will occur here by keeping the good low-income residents and throwing out the bad, thereby minimizing negative gentrification trends. The live/work spaces and additional retail spaces is also very welcome news, although on the retail front the neighborhood already has a good amount of existing, empty (deteriorating in some cases) storefronts just west of here on W Broad. Still, this is wonderful news for the neighborhood and I can't help but wonder what the naysayers think of this.

 

The city will make its first investment in the amount of $900,000 in a warehouse to be owned by the Franklinton Development Association as an important catalytic project for the area. The Franklinton Development Association will transform the warehouse into 42 units designed for living and working.

 

The four partners, along with neighborhood leaders, will establish a joint development plan, embracing this new live-work creative district.

 

The Urban Smart Growth Company will renovate an old abandoned factory with cheap commercial space marketed for creative business, retail and entertainment uses. They will also demolish a portion of the B&T Metals site nearby and implement a plan that embraces both living and working along McDowell Street.

 

This summer CMHA will relocate the residents currently located in Riverside Bradley to a new facility on W. Broad Street and demolish the entire area for a fresh, new and exciting start. CMHA will construct a mixed income neighborhood similar to New Village Homes in the Italian Village area.

 

This new creative live-work district will be a healthy, sustainable community connected to Downtown housing. It will be a cool, funky and, most of all, an affordable place to be.

 

http://www.10tv.com/live/content/local/stories/2011/02/23/story-text-state-of-city.html

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More about those Franklinton projects that were prominently featured in Mayor Coleman's state of the city address:

 

Four projects key to Franklinton rebirth

Coleman plan announced this week will boost COSI neighbors

Friday, February 25, 2011

By Doug Caruso, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

When the Franklinton contingent at the State of the City address erupted into applause Wednesday night, some of it came from genuine surprise.

 

Mayor Michael B. Coleman had just announced that Columbus would back the redevelopment of the neighborhood with $900,000 to buy a warehouse on State Street.  It will allow the Franklinton Development Association to turn the warehouse into 42 condominiums, with studio workspace for artists and other creative types.  Even Jim Sweeney, executive director of the development association, said yesterday that he hadn't been 100 percent sure that Coleman would make the commitment.

 

The warehouse, at 435 W. State St., is now owned by the AD Farrow Co., a Harley-Davidson motorcycle dealer.  With the city's help, Sweeney said, the nonprofit Franklinton Development Association will exercise its option to buy it and start renovating it with an eye toward selling the first units in late 2012 or early 2013.

 

READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2011/02/25/four-projects-key-to-rebirth.html?sid=101

 


FRANKLINTON DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS - LOCATION MAP

 

1) A.D. FARROW WAREHOUSE - 435 W. STATE ST.

City of Columbus would finance the $900,000 purchase for the non-profit Franklinton Development Association.  FDA would turn the warehouse into 42 condominiums, with studio workspace for artists.

 

2) B&T METALS - 425 W. TOWN ST.

This is the contaminated industrial property bought by a California developer and awarded a $750,000 state grant to clean up the site.  After the clean-up is finished, plans call for 132 condominiums and artists’ lofts.

 

3) EICKHOLT GLASS FACTORY - 401 W. TOWN ST.

Although it has an different address in this article, this looks like its the 400 WEST RICH project that was previously posted.  This warehouse is being renovated as affordable studio space for artists.  More about this here.

 

4) RIVERSIDE BRADLEY HOMES & SUNSHINE TERRACE

Public housing projects between Rich Street and the Scioto River to be demolished starting this summer.  The Columbus Metro Housing Authority plans to replace them with a new mixed-income housing development.  This new development would be modelled on a similar type CMHA replacement development in Italian Village.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2011/02/25/four-projects-key-to-rebirth.html?sid=101

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