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Newport, KY: Ovation

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Corporex moving forward on next $45 million piece of Ovation

 

Corporex, the master developer of Ovation in Newport, is moving forward with the next phases of development of the riverfront property.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2020/06/01/exclusive-corporex-moving-forward-on-next-45m.html

 

ovationofficebirdseyeview01*1200xx6997-3


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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They have absolutely no idea what they’re doing. This is what you get when banks design cities. 

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I love that in the article, Corporex brags about a development in Denver that they started in 2009.  As far as I can tell, it is less than half developed to this day, although something may have just started in November 2019. 

https://goo.gl/maps/PSAmKZHH2uaamr3P6   

Hilarious.  

 

Quote

 

Tom Banta, managing director of Corporex, said now might seem like a crazy time to be moving forward on a large-scale development project, but the company has historically had a lot of success starting work on major projects during a recession. Back in the heart of the Great Recession in 2009, Corporex started the $100 million Fitzsimons Village project in Denver, and Banta said they had a great experience with it.

“Building when no one else is building has real economic advantages to it,” Banta told me. “It’s hard to finance, you have to put more capital in, you’ve got to have the resources. But if you can do it, it’s a great time to be building.”

 

 

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3 minutes ago, nicker66 said:

I love that in the article, Corporex brags about a development in Denver that they started in 2009.  As far as I can tell, it is less than half developed to this day, although something may have just started in November 2019. 

https://goo.gl/maps/PSAmKZHH2uaamr3P6   

Hilarious.  

 

 

 

Yeah but to Corporex, that is developed! They are slime balls. The only reason they went out to Denver, was because no one locally wanted to work with them anymore. The cheapskate crap they use to pull on architects, engineers, and contractors. This Ovation site would be better developed by someone else. Ovation should be renamed Fort Newport, The whole site is off the street grid and up in the air two stories. 

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On 6/1/2020 at 3:27 PM, ColDayMan said:

Corporex moving forward on next $45 million piece of Ovation

 

Corporex, the master developer of Ovation in Newport, is moving forward with the next phases of development of the riverfront property.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2020/06/01/exclusive-corporex-moving-forward-on-next-45m.html

 

ovationofficebirdseyeview01*1200xx6997-3

This is arguably the same thing that they're doing at The Banks -- development is only over a certain height to deal with floodplain/insurance issues. It just... sucks for pedestrians all the time. What Cinci did right is that the street level is also elevated above garage, although that's obviously insanely expensive compared to... this.

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44 minutes ago, jebleprls22 said:

This is arguably the same thing that they're doing at The Banks -- development is only over a certain height to deal with floodplain/insurance issues. It just... sucks for pedestrians all the time. What Cinci did right is that the street level is also elevated above garage, although that's obviously insanely expensive compared to... this.

 

It is but then again, it's not. Newport has a flood berm that is elevated to withstand a 500-year flood. This part of Ovation is behind that berm so floodplain regulations do not apply since the land is protected by the berm.

 

This is just bad planning. 

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“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche

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^So are there actual insurance issues, despite the fact that the site is located behind a giant levee system that has never been compromised?

 

Manhattan Harbor's home lots are outside Bellevue's levee but high enough that they likely never will be menaced by flood waters.  

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What the heck is up with that lane configuration? Are the middle lanes express lanes? 


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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9 minutes ago, BigDipper 80 said:

What the heck is up with that lane configuration? Are the middle lanes express lanes? 

 

Basically.  It's a disaster zone.  This plus the traffic circles make the whole place pedestrian and bike unfriendly.  

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3 minutes ago, BigDipper 80 said:

What the heck is up with that lane configuration? Are the middle lanes express lanes? 

 

In a way yes, since no turns are allowed.  The frontage/access roads on either side have parking and access to the various properties.  The tough part is that to drive from one access road to the other (legally) requires you to go to the roundabouts at the Taylor Southgate Bridge or the 4th Street Bridge and loop all the way around. https://goo.gl/maps/5BomYUeNE9Tcs5xP6 I actually find it ok for biking, as you just use the service road, but there's no way to bypass the roundabouts and the merge back onto the "main" road requires a lot of neck craning, whether in a car or on a bike.  

 

Regarding flooding, if you draw a line due south from the Taylor Southgate Bridge roundabout, everything west of there to the Licking River is in what FEMA calls an "area of reduced flood risk due to levee."  So there's still flood risk issues.  In fact, the Ovation site looks to be in a high risk A area whereas it goes to B and C the farther south you go.  This may be due not so much to risk from levee failure or river flooding, but in a 100 year event stormwater behind the levee may not be able to be pumped out fast enough.  

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7 minutes ago, jjakucyk said:

 but in a 100 year event stormwater behind the levee may not be able to be pumped out fast enough.  

 

When I lived in Athens, there was often flooding behind the levee system due to drainage/sewer problems.  A bike path tops the levee...there were times when the big box stores and strip malls had to close because their parking lots flooded:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Athens,+OH+45701/@39.3372152,-82.0690836,1705m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x88487a8a2843c5d3:0x30b0012f06624a2b!8m2!3d39.3292396!4d-82.1012554

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2 hours ago, jmecklenborg said:

^So are there actual insurance issues, despite the fact that the site is located behind a giant levee system that has never been compromised?

 

Manhattan Harbor's home lots are outside Bellevue's levee but high enough that they likely never will be menaced by flood waters.  

 

Flood insurance isn't required in an area protected b a certified levy, but it is "strongly recommended" by FEMA. They could develop the ground level and leave it uninsured, but they'd be taking on a moderate risk. They'd probably insure it, which drives up the overall investment.

 

I've designed a few buildings in flood plains and the cheapest/easiest option for those has been to... pile up dirt until the site is high enough to be above the 1% flood plain.

 

 

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4 hours ago, BigDipper 80 said:

What the heck is up with that lane configuration? Are the middle lanes express lanes? 

 

I think this has become a popular street configuration in places where a New Urbanist development gets squeezed around a medium/high traffic arterial — here's a similarly designed street in Bothell, WA. It's an attempt to satisfy everyone's wants (limited access high speed lanes for thru traffic + "business access" lanes with tons of parallel parking that also double as bike lanes) but results in a really wide and ugly street.

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18 minutes ago, taestell said:

 

I think this has become a popular street configuration in places where a New Urbanist development gets squeezed around a medium/high traffic arterial — here's a similarly designed street in Bothell, WA. It's an attempt to satisfy everyone's wants (limited access high speed lanes for thru traffic + "business access" lanes with tons of parallel parking that also double as bike lanes) but results in a really wide and ugly street.

 

It's like the Champs-Élysées (at least before the access roads were turned into sidewalks) but without quite achieving the proper scale of buildings or sidewalks in comparison to the huge amount of space dedicated to cars and bio-swales.  Still, I'd say the Bothell, WA designers did a lot of things right, considering that would otherwise be a 13-lane monster.  Newport's street has the advantage of being smaller, but it's completely barren.  There's no trees in the planting strips, and there's also no accommodation for trees at the parallel parking bays or sidewalk, so it might just as well be an 8-laner for all the opportunities they're squandering.  

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