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‘User fee’ on ticket sales would benefit Columbus arts groups

 

Hoping to provide long-term stability for arts organizations in Columbus, the Greater Columbus Arts Council will soon ask the city council to approve a “user fee” on certain ticket sales and also request funding from Franklin County.  GCAC President Tom Katzenmeyer said the plan could generate between $15 million and $20 million a year, most of which would go back to the dozens of artists and organizations that GCAC supports.

( . . . )

Katzenmeyer said the GCAC will brief council members about the proposal in a meeting next week.  If the council approves the plan, a charge of between 3 and 8 percent would be added to all tickets to arts, cultural, entertainment and professional sporting events within the city limits.  That would include events at Nationwide Arena, Value City Arena and Ohio Stadium — except for collegiate and high-school sporting events.

 

MORE: http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20180126/user-fee-on-ticket-sales-would-benefit-columbus-arts-groups

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Convention center’s ‘As We Are’ statue gaining attention, visitors

By Marla Matzer Rose, The Columbus Dispatch

Updated: February 9, 2018 at 7:22 AM

 

It may not have the iconic status of Chicago’s “Bean,” but Matthew Mohr’s “As We Are” sculpture at the Greater Columbus Convention Center is getting plenty of recognition.  Since it was unveiled six months ago, capping the center’s $140 million renovation, the interactive, three-dimensional LED sculpture of a human head has garnered national, and even international, attention in the media and from other cities seeking a similar work from Mohr, a professor at the Columbus College of Art & Design.

 

The sculpture, within the center and visible from High Street near E. Goodale Street, includes a sort of high tech “selfie booth” that allows visitors to have their image taken and projected on the 14-foot sculpture.  After displaying the new image, the photo is stored and becomes part of a rotation of images displayed.  As of late January, more than 10,000 people had added their photos to the database.

 

It’s been featured on CNN and the Huffington Post and in trade publications serving the convention and visitor industry. ... “I’m getting contacted literally on a daily basis,” Mohr said.  “I’ve been offered to bring it to Barcelona for a TV show. I’ve been contacted from people in China, Japan ... I was asked to do a TED talk in Vancouver."  Mohr has also been contacted about possibly doing a smaller-scale version of “As We Are” to be featured as part of a temporary “pop-up” installation in New York’s Times Square.  One thing Mohr won’t do is make a literal copy of “As We Are.”  He promised the Franklin County Convention Facilities Authority, which controls the convention center, an exclusive.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/news/20180209/convention-centers-as-we-are-statue-gaining-attention-visitors

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http://www.dispatch.com/news/20180309/hamilton-spurs-sellout-of-season-passes-for-broadway-in-columbus

 

The 16,000 season passes for Broadway in Columbus sold out for the first time ever Thursday, leaving only about half of the seats available for single-show sales for the Broadway hit’s three-week stop at the Ohio Theatre.  Across 24 shows between Jan. 29 and Feb. 17, 2019, about 66,000 people will see “Hamilton” in Columbus.  About 33,000 tickets will be released for single-show sales at a yet-to-be-announced date.

 

Tickets to “Hamilton” in Columbus already have popped up on the secondary market under skyrocketing prices.  The cheapest available on ticketnetwork.com as of Friday morning was $423 each to sit in the balcony.  After that, tickets jump to more than $600.

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Story of Percy King - former football player who played safety at Ohio State in the late 90's and briefly in the NFL - who is now an artist in Columbus who creates large-scale 3-D wood portraits with something he calls the ‘Shaolin Wood Technique’:

 

http://www.columbusalive.com/entertainment/20170726/arts-feature-former-osu-footballer-carving-out-spot-in-arts-community

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After nationally-known artist Aminah Robinson died in 2015, her will named the Columbus Museum of Art (CMA) as the beneficiary of her public works of art.  This includes works that are displayed in the Hammond Harkins Gallery in Columbus and the American Contemporary Art in New York City.  It also includes her longtime home on the city’s East Side.

 

After she died, CMA brought specialists into the home to help with documenting all that she left behind - known for her prolific output, Robinson used almost every room in the house as a studio and filled journal after journal with her writings and illustrations - then they began moving items to the museum for storage.  Meanwhile, a community advisory group was formed to come up with a plan for the house - CMA is leaning toward establishing it as an artists’ residency.

 

CMA also hopes to hold a major exhibition of Robinson’s work in 2020 with the working title of "Aminah’s House":

 

http://www.columbusmonthly.com/lifestyle/20170707/arts-story-behind-aminah-robinsons-gift-of-life

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Stev Guyer, founder of local theatrical group Shadowbox Live, passed away in March at the age of 63 after a battle with cancer.  Earlier this year, Guyer stepped away from his duties as CEO and President of the group following surgery.

 

Members of the Shadowbox troupe assumed Stev Guyer’s leadership roles at that time and will continue to operate this arts group that he founded in 1989:

 

https://www.columbusunderground.com/shadowbox-live-founder-stev-guyer-has-died-we1

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/03/30/shadowbox-live-continues-on-after-death-of-co.html

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Columbus ticket tax proposal cut to 5%, with Nationwide Arena funding its own improvements and Ohio State kicking in $1M a year

 

Columbus City Council unveiled a revised proposal to fund arts organizations with a lower tax on tickets to many events held in the city.  And as a bonus, Ohio State has pledged $1 million a year to help sustain the arts citywide.

 

The new plan cuts the proposed levy from 7 percent – which would have been the second-highest in the state – to 5 percent.  The old plan would have sent 30 percent of the tax revenue to Nationwide Arena, which was a sticking point for many.

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/11/27/columbus-ticket-tax-proposal-cut-to-5-with.html

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Wexner Center for the Arts finds new director in New York

 

The Wexner Center for the Arts has named Johanna Burton its new director.  Burton is the Keith Haring Director and Curator of Education and Public Engagement at the New Museum in NYC. ... Burton will start in March.  She replaces Sherri Geldin, who spent 25 years at the Wexner Center for the Arts.

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/11/28/wexner-center-for-the-arts-finds-new-director-in.html

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Ticket tax passed by City Council; rate set at 5% with exemptions

 

The controversial ticket tax saga is coming to an end, for now.  Late Monday night, Columbus City Council voted to enact a 5 percent admissions fee on arts and cultural events in the city, with several exemptions:

  • Events that charge less than $10.
  • Events in venues with 400 seats or less.
  • Events put on by 501(c) nonprofits that don't receive funding from the Greater Columbus Arts Council.
  • Fundraising events by GCAC-backed entities.
  • Events by public and private educational institutions, and sporting events sponsored by the NCAA, including at Ohio State University (OSU will contribute $1 million a year to the new arts fund)

A separate 5 percent tax on events at Nationwide Arena also passed council, setting up a fund dedicated to repairs and maintenance at the publicly owned venue. ... The taxes weren't approved without a fight.  Several opponents stayed until late in the long-running meeting to tell council members what they thought, while organizers of a group opposing the taxes promised a ballot initiative to overturn them.

 

Some previous opponents of the taxes have come around to support it, however.  The All American Quarter Horse Congress, one of the city's largest annual gatherings, dropped its opposition after council exempted the nonprofit.  The Columbus Blue Jackets also reversed its opposition.  And Jim Lorimer, co-founder of the Arnold Sports Festival, said he could support the tax once it was dropped to 5 percent. ... The taxes won’t go into effect until July 1.

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/12/11/ticket-tax-passed-by-city-council-rate-set-at-5.html

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CATCO (aka Contemporary American Theatre Company) will be getting a new leader in 2020:

 

CATCO Director Steven C. Anderson to Retire at End of 2019-20 Season

 

Steven C. Anderson, one of Central Ohio’s longtime arts leaders and the producing director of CATCO, announced he will retire at the end of the 2019-20 theatre season on June 30, 2020.  Since 1978, Anderson has been a leader in Columbus’ arts scene, working as the director of education and associate producing director at Players Theatre and later founding The Phoenix Theatre for Children in 1993.  He was tapped to lead the merged theatre organization of CATCO and Phoenix — later renamed CATCO is Kids — in 2010.

( . . . )

CATCO board members and community arts leaders will begin a nationwide search for Anderson’s replacement. That announcement is expected in early 2020.

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/catco-director-steven-c-anderson-to-retire-at-end-of-2019-20-season-tm1

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Created to save the Ohio Theatre, a vibrant CAPA turns 50

 

Time was up for the Loew’s Ohio Theatre.  On May 23, 1969, efforts to save the historic Downtown theater from the wrecking ball had failed.  The group of four who had been negotiating to save it trudged dejectedly downstairs from a second-floor theater office.  It was 6 p.m., time for the public “tag sale” that would strip the 1928 Spanish Baroque-style theater of its fixtures and furnishings — seats, chandeliers, everything.  Outside, people were lined up and getting impatient.

 

“The press was waiting in the lobby, and we came down the stairs with the intention of announcing there was no deal and the Ohio Theatre would be torn down,” said Scott Whitlock, one of the four negotiators.  “We were one step from the bottom, and a voice called down from above, `We have another idea, come back up.’”  Twenty minutes later, three men who controlled the fixtures in the building agreed to sell to the negotiators, who two days earlier had founded an organization called the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts after securing an option to buy the theater— something that would be worthless if it was stripped bare.  The cranky crowd went home empty-handed.

 

Nearly 50 years later, CAPA owns two historic Downtown theaters in addition to the Ohio — the Southern Theatre (opened in 1896) and the Palace Theatre (1926) — and it manages seven others.  The group arguably saved several of the city’s premier arts organizations from bankruptcy and helped lead Downtown’s resurgence.  “It’s hard to imagine what the arts scene would look like in Columbus without CAPA, and Downtown certainly would look very different,” said Chad Whittington, CAPA’s president and CEO.

 

CAPA is marking its golden anniversary with a series of special events, beginning with a free organ concert and singalong in the Ohio Theatre, replicating the event that was to be part of the venue’s “final performance” in 1969.

 

MORE:  https://www.dispatch.com/entertainmentlife/20190315/created-to-save-ohio-theatre-vibrant-capa-turns-50

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^ I just love that story about the saving of the wonderful Ohio Theatre and the de facto creation of Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (aka CAPA).

 

If you can't view it at the Dispatch link, the full article is also available at the Dispatch-owned ThisWeekNews site linked below.  It's definitely worth a read - plus there is a 44-image slideshow of historical images of the Ohio Theatre (plus a couple images of the Old Columbus City Hall - which was on the Ohio Theatre site at 55 E. State Street until it burned down in 1921!)

 

https://www.thisweeknews.com/entertainmentlife/20190315/created-to-save-ohio-theatre-vibrant-capa-turns-50

 

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