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Arts Council president dies after fall

WBNS 10TV

Sunday, April 16, 2006 9:45 AM

 

Ray Hanley, president of the Columbus Arts Council, died early Sunday after falling from a fifth-floor veranda at 1 Miranova Place, police said.  Hanley, who does not live at the apartments, was visiting friends when he fell.  When emergency crews arrived on the scene, he was in cardiac arrest.  Hanley, 58, was taken to Grant Medical Center, where he died a short time later. 

 

Police investigated the scene and say there is no indication of foul play.  They will continue to investigate the case.  Hanley, the sometimes- controversial president of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, announced his plans last fall to step down from the $185,000-a-year job on May 8, 2007, the 22nd anniversary of his appointment in 1985.

 

Read more at http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=180006

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RAY HANLEY 1947-2006

Community loses a fierce arts advocate

Monday, April 17, 2006

Michael Grossberg

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Columbus arts leaders are remembering Ray Hanley as a fierce advocate who stirred controversy while helping to nurture central Ohio cultural organizations.  Hanley, 58, died yesterday in an accidental fall from a fifthfloor terrace at the Miranova condominium tower Downtown.  He led the Greater Columbus Arts Council for two decades, longer than any previous director.

 

Hanley spent his last evening enjoying the company of friends and artists at a benefit Saturday night for the Columbus AIDS Task Force at the Columbus College of Art & Design, according to Wayne Lawson, executive director emeritus of the Ohio Arts Council and Dennison W. Griffith, CCAD president.  After the event, Hanley went to the Miranova home of Loann Crane, his friend and a former chairwoman of the GCAC board.  Hanley tripped and fell from a planter surrounding the terrace while helping Crane let her dog out, said her son Dr. Rob Crane.

 

More at http://dispatch.com/weekender/weekender.php?story=dispatch/2006/04/17/20060417-A1-04.html

 

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Local arts leader had coronary disease

Heart attack may have figured into fatal fall

Tuesday, April 18, 2006

Jeb Phillips and Michael Grossberg

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

A Columbus arts executive might have had a heart attack before he fell from the fifth story of a Downtown condominium tower early Sunday morning.  An initial examination of his body found that Ray Hanley, the president of the Greater Columbus Arts Council, had "significant coronary disease" when he died, Franklin County Coroner Bradley Lewis said.

 

"What we’re trying to figure out is did he die from the fall or from some cardiac event? " Lewis said. "Did the cardiac event perhaps cause the fall?"  There’s no definitive evidence that Hanley had a heart attack, Lewis said.  There wasn’t a clot in an artery that might have suddenly caused an attack, but his arteries had narrowed, he said.

 

For more information and a tribute to Hanley, visit www.gcac.org

 

More at http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/04/18/20060418-D3-01.html

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$10 million donation is museum’s biggest

Walters want to shine light on art institution with rare show of public philanthropy

Thursday, September 14, 2006

Bill Mayr

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

As a volunteer in the Columbus Museum of Art’s cafe during the 1990s, Peggy Walter served soups and salads. Yesterday, she and her husband, Robert D., served up something a bit more substantial: a $10 million gift to the museum, the largest single financial donation in the institution’s 128-year history.

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Hi All,

 

I agree with gold42. I was very very disappointed with my first visit to the Chihuly <sp> a number of years ago. I would have thought with all the money in Columbus, and I don't mean state money, that more would have been done. Hopefully this will help start something. Bear hugz to all.

 

Jim S.

 

 

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"The operations endowment currently stands at $12 million. A separate endowment, at $8 million, generates revenue strictly for art purchases."

 

So a total endowment of $20 million. To put things in perspective, the Cleveland Museum of Art has an endowment of approximately $700 million. Glad to hear Columbus is getting a boost - they need it!

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That's one thing I was hoping the article would highlight; that the Columbus Museum of Art really has very little to work with as far as monetary contributions to keep adding to the collection while at the same time maintaining daily operations compared to its peers in every other major metro in the state. Columbus was never blessed with industrial patrons to the arts like Libby in Toledo and Rockefeller in Cleveland that helped set the presidence for their respective museums, which automatically puts the museum at a disadvantage. Current display space is severely lacking, as evident in putting all the old masters painting in one room hung on top of one another. The museum does host a decent modernist collection, but again is not able to capitalize on that strength as much as it could without better funding. Here's hoping the Walters' generous gift helps prop up a Columbus institution that needs some time in the limelight.

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Hi All,

 

Isn't there any old money in Columbus? The Galbreath's, Wendy's dad :-o  Dave something, Nationwide or any other moneyed folks from the 19th or 20th century? The museum is housed in a very nice building. Bear hugz.

 

Jim S.

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I'm actually shocked the museum has so little money. Obviously Cleveland would have more because of our industrial days, but, geez, you'd think some of the "new money" people would be chipping in in Columbus to help create the storied arts organizations of the future. I can definitely see Columbus constructing a giant, ballsy addition/new art museum like they did in Denver http://www.denverartmuseum.org/home.

 

 

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Who are the Galbreath's? I wouldn't consider Dave Thomas (Wendy's "dad") old money at all, since he was an orphan. He built his Wendy's empire through the 60s and 70s, and most of the money he donated went to the Salesians Boys & Girls Club, a nationwide nonprofit youth organization. Nationwide isn't a person. There is some old money (Wexner, Schottenstein), but it pails in comparison to the wealth seen in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Toledo, Dayton, and Akron during the roaring 20s.

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Obviously Cleveland would have more because of our industrial days, but, geez, you'd think some of the "new money" people would be chipping in in Columbus to help create the storied arts organizations of the future.

 

I think another "problem" nowadays is the acquasition costs of pieces of art, especially big-name old masters pieces. Many pieces in the museums in Cleveland, Toledo, and Cincinnati were donated by wealthy industrialists, which Columbus did not have. Even if more "new money" citizens were to give to the organization, it would be impossible for the museum to amass a collection similar to those found in other cities in the state. I think the Walters themselves pointed out another reason why the museum doesn't see much in the way of private gifts: the fact that it even exists is relatively unknown in Columbus. I would hope that their prominance would help encourage other wealthy Central Ohioan to take a look and support what little we actually do have, and contribute in helping to improve it.

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I agree that the cost of art is rising to unrealistic prices. It's probably nearly impossible to get into the  "classics" game right now. Most of the Monets and Picassos have homes, like you said.

 

If I ran the museum in Columbus, I'd think about working into a different sort of niche. I'm no art historian, but there has to be a segment of art that they could really go after and own.

 

Whatevs! I've been to the museum, and I thought it was a bit small, but I liked it. Are you serious that people don't know it exists? The first thing I do when I roll into town is find the local art museums. I may need to go from mansion to mansion and give them a what for  :lol:

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quote]The first thing I do when I roll into town is find the local art museums.

 

I'm the exact same way! It seems like a visit to an art museum is a great way to take in local culture through the building, the environment in which it exists, and of course, the wonderful pieces that the city has amassed over the years. Most recently I *finally* got to visit both Cincinnati's and Dayton's museums and I must say, we are definitely blessed to have such great institutions in Ohio. I'm eagerly anticipating visiting Akron's once their gorgeous expansion is complete.

 

Most of the Monets and Picassos have homes, like you said.

 

Actually, the Columbus Museum of Art does have a modest modernist collection, with several Picassos and Matisse. It's the old masters that is severely lacking, like Rembrandt and El Greco. Masterpieces of that calibar are impossible for the museum to acquire now.

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Lord know CMOA can use all the help it can get.  Our Art Musuem pales in comparison to most other major cities in Ohio...

I clicked on this link just to say the same thing. I drove up to columbus with my friend--we went to the art museum and were extremely disappointed.

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I love the Columbus Museum of Art! I dont care what anyone says, it is the best. Believe me, I have been to museums in London, Berlin, and Italy. But to me, in a deep heart-felt way, the Columbus Musuem of Art is the best. Just my two cents.

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I love the Columbus Museum of Art! I dont care what anyone says, it is the best. Believe me, I have been to museums in London, Berlin, and Italy. But to me, in a deep heart-felt way, the Columbus Musuem of Art is the best. Just my two cents.

 

Were these museums "Ripley's Believe It or Not?"


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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From the 4/4/07 Dispatch:

 

GRAPHIC: Scorecard for the arts

 

New outlook for arts?

Columbus must do more to fund and promote its struggling cultural scene, panel says

Wednesday, April 04, 2007

Robert Vitale

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Columbus has plenty of theaters and galleries, a few artsy neighborhoods, and a lot of people eager to be enriched and entertained.  It also has financially struggling groups that perform on local stages and other creative ventures that can?t get off the ground.  It's time for Columbus to adopt a "cultural policy" that coordinates and guides the arts, ensures adequate funding to help them prosper, and nurtures young artists who otherwise might go elsewhere, a City Council-created panel says.

 

Full story: http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/04/04/20070404-A1-00.html

 

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In 2005, GCAC found Columbus last among seven similarly sized cities in endowments for local organizations.

 

Why is this so? 

 

Is it because Columbus did not have a thriving arts scene to endow back in the late 19th and early 20th century like Cincy and Cleveland had?

 

Does Columbus have an established 'feeder system' of young artists like Cinc? (College Conservatory of Music, School for Creative and Performing Arts, etc)

 

Is it because Columbus demographics are younger and therefore, not in the age group and income group that typically provides a lot of support to the arts?

 

Is it a statistical insignificant issue? Someone has to be last, and yet they may be only a few dollars shy of being first?

 

Maybe people in Columbus do not like the arts?  Maybe an over-reliance on college sports for entertainment?  (I doubt this is the case, but just giving someone ammo to reply)

 

Why is Columbus lagging in the development of its arts?

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What Columbus lacks in terms of endowment from established organizations it more than makes up with independent art stores and festivals.  I mean, the Short North is an arts destination.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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According to Americans for the Arts' 2005 Creative Communities report (http://www.americansforthearts.org/pdf/information_resources/research_information/services/creative_industries/county_report.pdf), among the 50 most populated counties:

 

# of arts businesses

Franklin County ranks 41st; Cuyahoga, ranks 29

 

# of arts businesses per 1,000 residents

Franklin, 31; Cuyahoga, 33

 

% increase in arts businesses, 2004-2005

Franklin, 20; Cuyahoga, 15

 

# of arts employees

Franklin, 30; Cuyahoga, 22

 

# of arts employees per 1,000 residents

Franklin, 22; Cuyahoga, 24

 

Percentage increase in arts employees, 2004-2005

Franklin, 7; Cuyahoga, 6

 

A study my organization did showed that, in 2004 and among the 50 largest counties, Franklin County was nationally competitive in Print Publishing (with the 7th highest concentration of employees compared to the other 49 counties) and Radio and Television Broadcasting (15th). Meanwhile, Cuyahoga County was nationally competitive in Performing Arts and Sports Promoters (4th), Print Publishing (5th), Museums, Historical and Nature Sites (11th) and Performing Arts Companies (13th). Neither was nationally competitive in terms of concentration of independent artists (Franklin ranked 25th and Cuyahoga ranked 33rd).

 

Hamilton County arts-related businesses were not reviewed in either study, as the county does not rank among the 50 most populated nationwide.

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I love the arts as much as the next guy (I minored in art history!!) but I'm slightly frustrated by many arts folks' supposition that it's the public's fault they have never have any money. When I used to be a newspaper reporter, I interviewed artists all the time and they always said they wished the community supported them more. While I understood their frustration, I always wondered what the average person would do with a four-foot tall anti-war message painted on an old cubicle wall that was priced at $2,000.

 

And to ColDayMan's point, glitzy arts organizations are great, but lets not forget that many of the greatest arts institutions and artists started much smaller than they are today. With the right brew of artists and entrepreneurs, the Short North could be the Greenwich Village of the future. Why not? The MoMA in NYC wasn't born and then competitive with the Louvre within five years. Personally, while New York is obviously the cultural leader in the United States, I think the field is wide open for an upstart. Why not Columbus...or Cleveland or Cincy for that matter. The key is attracting the talent to make this happen. How can you do this? I don't know.

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^I think it's happening by itself since starving artists can't afford to starve in New York anymore.  The problem is that everyone else is dispersed around any one of the country's 30 second-tier cities and that people in the second-tier cities themselves constantly look to New York for validation.  I've definitely seen better art shows in the hinterlands than in New York, it usually seems to me to be as much a needle in a haystack search for good new art shows in New York as much as anywhere else. 

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I agree with ColDayMans comment on Cols indy arts/gallery scene.  And I think the Wexner helps a bit in town with creating a more modern scene.

 

The article seems to be more about the performing arts.  The two good examples that I know about for a coordinated fundraising approach for these types of arts orgs was Louisville's Fund for the Arts, and Dayton's Cultureworks.  These coordinated fundrasing drives between the various peforming arts organizations, though individual organizations have their own donor bases, too.

 

A point about this is that, at least in Dayton, the DAI is not part of this, as they see their fundraising efforts and programming as different than what Cultureworks does. Im not sure if the Speed in Louisville has the same policy in re the Fund for the Arts.

 

it calls for Columbus to join cities across the nation that have begun viewing the arts not just as a diversion but as an economic-development tool to attract new businesses and residents.

 

I recall reading either Richard Florida or someone esle who says that this is not really what attracts the creative class...they are drawn less to the old-line arts organizations like museums or ballet or so forth, but more to an indy arts/gallery scene, which Cols has a good start on.

 

 

 

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There is also the question of whether a city should want to have a few, very high quality flagship institutions (for example, the Cleveland Orchestra) or many smaller institutions and individuals of variable quality.  Obviously one would ideally prefer quantity and quality, but when it comes to, for example, doling out precious funds, people need to make choices.

 

For comparison's sake, orchestrafacts.org lists the annual budget of some regional orchestras:

 

Cleveland: $36 million

Cincinnati: $32 million

Indianapolis: $24 million

Columbus: $10.5 million

Louisville: $7 million

 

 

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^

That is the case in smaller citys.  In Louisville the emphasis is on Actors Theatre.  Here in Dayton the flagship isntitution is probably the ballet.  Both these citys have the full range of performing arts...ballet, theatre, opera, and orchestra (with maybe a few smaller presenters thrown in), but there is usually just one that is "the best".

 

In larger citys like Cleveland and Cincinnati, where there is enough capacity to provide support and patronage, there can be more than one high quality peforming arts instititiun.

 

 

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Does Columbus have an established 'feeder system' of young artists like Cinc? (College Conservatory of Music, School for Creative and Performing Arts, etc)

 

 

there are feeders in cols for sure. ccad downtown is a big one. even osu busts out a art star every so often, like jenny holzer. although its been duplicated quite a bit already, the wexner put cols on the art world map. after it opened i started to see small show ads in the art lit like art in america and art forum, that was a first for ohio.

 

like ccad in cols, oberlin, cia and virginia marte (ohio's f.i.t.!) do the same for cleveland.

 

^I think it's happening by itself since starving artists can't afford to starve in New York anymore.  The problem is that everyone else is dispersed around any one of the country's 30 second-tier cities and that people in the second-tier cities themselves constantly look to New York for validation.  I've definitely seen better art shows in the hinterlands than in New York, it usually seems to me to be as much a needle in a haystack search for good new art shows in New York as much as anywhere else.  

 

the problems in the hinterlands are both lack of a critical mass and a lack of publicity. it's only made worse by the explosion of new galleries in nyc, the nyc haystack is getting much bigger. still, everyone carries on -- as they should.

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^ Uh oh ... now we're talking who has the best arts scene in the state? I'm not inclined to launch a Cleveland/Columbus comparison, but I will say that I think all three Cs have a pretty strong arts scene and that we're underestimating Cleveland's grassroots arts and culture scene. It's not all Cleveland Orchestras and Cleveland Museums of Art up here ... there are a lot of cool, emerging organizations up here, without a doubt. These community-based organizations have had a profound effect on neighborhoods like Tremont and Little Italy and are poised to do so in Detroit-Shoreway and Asiatown. And now neighborhoods throughout Cleveland are trying to build exactly the grassroots arts scenes you guys are talking about - I've had conversations with Westown, Collinwood and Old Brooklyn, who are all thinking about how to generate this kind of scene based on their own unique amenities.

 

And I would definitely caution selling major institutions short. Sure, grassroots organizations are great for supporting vibrant neighborhoods and drawing in the Creative Class, but major organizations have the pull to be real economic engines for a community.

 

A recent research report my organization did showed that 12 larger arts and culture orgs in Cleveland (including the Cleveland Museum of Art, Playhouse Square and the Rock Hall but not the Orchestra) brought in $13.8 million from outside Northeast Ohio between 2001 and 2006, including $1.4 million from Sandusky, $772,000 from Columbus, $553,000 from Pittsburgh, $378,000 from NYC, $357,000 from Detroit and $316,000 from Chicago. Don't underestimate what the big boys do for generating economic activity for your community.

 

 

 

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from outside Northeast Ohio between 2001 and 2006, including $1.4 million from Sandusky,

 

My in-laws live in Sandusky (and worked there).  They and their friends attend the Cleveland Opera, Symphony, etc regularly.  They consider Celveland the local city, so I would not say Sandusky is 'outside NE Ohio'.  They view themselves as an exurbe of Clev.  (they also go to Toledo a bit, but are Clev-oriented)

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^ Yeah, I can see how that would be the case. For the purposes of the study, "Northeast Ohio" was defined as the 13-county service region of the Greater Cleveland Convention and Visitors Bureau (Ashtabula, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Trumbull and Wayne).

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"I'm slightly frustrated by many arts folks' supposition that it's the public's fault they have never have any money ... they always said they wished the community supported them more."

 

Much of that stems from the university level, where people get instruction on creating their work but not how to market it, or how to develop basic business savvy. It's like you said, they create works that might be groundbreaking and inspired, but unless someone buys it - they aren't going to be able to pay their bills. Artists who do well usually offer works at a variety of price points so their work appeals to a broader audience. The more successful artists are also more tuned in to things like how to apply for grants, what funds are available.

 

Regarding Columbus' status as having the best arts scene - I won't argue that the Short North is indeed one of the premier arts 'hoods in the State. However, as 8Shades said - the Cleveland gallery scene is less concentrated and spread over several neighborhoods, which has its ups and downs.

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Shameless plug (sorry Mayday for getting off topic, but you set me up for this one  :-D). For artists who are interested in learning how to make a living from their work, Cleveland has a great business training program called the Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute (http://www.cpacbiz.org/business/ent.shtml).

 

To date, more than 350 artists have completed the 24-hour course, and the program has drawn participants from Denver, Pittsburgh, San Diego and even a delegation from the Kyrgyz Republic. And now the program is being replicated in Ft. Lauderdale.

 

I can understand reluctance to accept the concept of supporting the arts publicly, but I will say communities that assist artists with obtaining business training, networking, health insurance, market development, home and business space, and yes, grants, will be the best poised to draw and retain creative workers ... particularly as cities across the nation are doing these very things. So how much you choose to invest in this type of support infrastructure is directly related to what kind of priority your community places on arts and culture in the long-term.

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I guess the question is what makes a city a good incubator for talent? The Short North Arts district is just that: a district. I don't get the sense that the area is producing or fostering young artists, one indicator being mind-blowingly high rent. Areas like Franklinton and Old Town East show more promise in that department. A strong underground is where an arts scene starts; money just helps attract benefactors. This is why for all the money Wexner spends, all you get are concert series. Detroit is a great example of this. An infinite number of arts commissions could write an infinite number of grants and never, ever produce a Tyree Guyton.

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8Shades,

 

Do you think that the new tax on cigarettes to support the arts will have much effect on the local scene in Cleveland? How much per year will be made available to artists? How will the money be distributed? Who is eligible?

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An infinite number of arts commissions could write an infinite number of grants and never, ever produce a Tyree Guyton.

 

From my Detroit days, I enjoyed looking at this little neighborhood. Did the city tear down his stuff? Is he also the one who painted dots on the vacate buildings?

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8Shades, that's exactly the type of support system that's needed, whether it's in Cleveland or any city for that matter. I'm absolutely in favor of public funds that are earmarked for the arts going to the support systems you've described (biz training, health insurance, etc.). Sort of the "helping people help themselves" kind of approach. Thanks to that kind of program, I think the mentality of artists that jamiec described ("I should just be given a blank check") will fade.

 

So to get back on topic - does Columbus have a similar program?

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8Shades,

 

Do you think that the new tax on cigarettes to suppor the arts will have much effect on the local scene in Cleveland? How much per year will be made available to artists? How will the money be distributed? Who is eligible?

 

I think the tax will have a huge impact on the local arts and culture scene. It's anticipated that it will result in $20 million in funding annually over the next 10 years, and the local foundations have expressed commitment to preserve their current funding of arts and culture nonprofits, and funds from the Ohio Arts Council have diminished since an all-time high in 2000 but are fairly consistent. So that means that we have a chance to really invest in the arts and culture sector.

 

I believe the majority of funding will go to General Operating Support for arts and culture nonprofits, but Cuyahoga Arts and Culture is also exploring a Project Fund (for organizations that aren't awarded general operating support but are doing arts and culture projects, whether they're an arts and culture organization or not), as well as an Artist Support Fund. The first round of General Operating Support funding will take place this fall; it has not been publicly announced when Project or Artist Support would go into effect.

 

But my org. isn't handling that stuff, so the best way to get up-to-date info is to visit www.cuyahogaartsandculture.org. Meetings of the Cuyahoga Arts and Culture board are also public, so you also have an opportunity to weigh in on this stuff as they're crafting the programs.

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An infinite number of arts commissions could write an infinite number of grants and never, ever produce a Tyree Guyton.

From my Detroit days, I enjoyed looking at this little neighborhood. Did the city tear down his stuff? Is he also the one who painted dots on the vacate buildings?

 

Ths city will come in and bulldoze stuff, but it always springs back to life. Yes: he's "dotted up" (and "faced of Godded up") every vacant building he could find.

 

Here: http://www.heidelberg.org/Pages/Artists/guyton/default.htm

 

 

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