Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Magyar

Columbus: Downtown: East Long Street / Neighborhood Launch Development

Recommended Posts

Some of those red spots representing surface lots on that Columbus map are going to disappear.

 

Downtown housing planned

Brewery District developer is expected to build in area between Gay, Long streets

Friday, April 14, 2006

Mike Pramik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

A Columbus developer has begun assembling the land to build a low-rise residential community Downtown, a city official confirmed yesterday.  The official said Jeff Edwards has had talks with the city about turning an area between Gay and Long streets into a residential development.  The area, which is bordered on the west by 4 th Street and on the east by 6 th Street, is mostly surface parking lots.

 

Edwards, whose family operates Edwards Co., has not presented plans to the Downtown Commission for approval, said Bob McLaughlin, the city’s downtown development director.  "He’s still completing assemblage, doing engineering work and those kinds of things," McLaughlin said.  Edwards, who did not return calls seeking comment yesterday, helped to drive the redevelopment of the Brewery District beginning in the 1980s.

 

Gay Street Condominium LLC is listed as having its headquarters at Edwards Co.’s Brewery District office building.  The Gay Street enterprise in March bought several parcels along E. Long Street that are being used as parking lots.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/business-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/04/14/20060414-E1-01.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The area being talked about for development is pretty massive. I wonder how many floors this proposed "low-rise" would be? As much as I desperately want the majority of these surface lots gone, it would be nice to have something with a little bit of height to it. Maybe the garage mentioned could comprise the first several stories with the residential built on top...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Condo 'neighborhood' sketched for E. Gay St.

Edwards making $70M bet on city living

Business First of Columbus - November 17, 2006

by Brian R. Ball Business First

 

A Columbus developer is ready to take the wraps off plans for a $70 million housing project downtown, Business First has learned.  Edwards Cos. will propose to build 250 condominiums at East Long and East Gay streets in a layout designed to evoke Chicago's Lincoln Park or New York's Murray Hill venerable enclaves.  The company expects to deliver its conceptual plans Nov. 21 to the city's Downtown Commission.

 

"It's a much different product than what's been built in the downtown by anybody else," said company President Jeff Edwards.  Indeed, the proposal calls for garden- and townhouse-style condos to be densely developed along several city blocks.  "Everyone kind of jumps up and down and thinks it's wonderful that (projects are) going up," Edwards said.  "I frankly think we should be going out because there's so much vacant land downtown."

 

Gay Street Condominiums LLC, an affiliate of the developer. has spent nearly $7.8 million since March acquiring about 60 percent of the project site. It paid an additional $350,000 in September for a property along the northern edge of Long Street that will serve as a construction staging area.

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2006/11/20/story1.html?page=1&b=1163998800^1378122

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As much as I look forward to the possibility of surface lots being developed, I'm somewhat disappointed about the location in relation to the core of the downtown. I'd like to see development of a taller scale in that area, given its proximity to High St. But given that continued lackluster office vacancy rate downtown, that's a pretty far-fetched desire. So, I'll take what I can get.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I'll take what I can get.

 

That's a dangerous attitude.  We're talking about residential developments that will be around for generations here.  These things don't just go away like surface lots.

 

I can't believe someone would propose three story rowhouses to be placed 1 block from the city's core.  Talk about looking rediculous.  We can certainly do better from a density perspective, especially this close to offices, retail (city center), and CCAC/Columbus State.  I'll be writing an email to the downtown development comittee in opposition, but I'd hope that thier common sense would shoot this down without my help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this would be a good development for DT Columbus.  Expecting all midrise residential downtown is unrealistic.  Gay St is a nice corridor as is, and I think complementing it with this type of residential is a good move. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that rendering.

 

But for a real neat site, or set of sites, for infill housing, look at the neighborhood between Broad and State, directly east of the Statehouse..that grid of little streets and small blocks....

 

20060414-Pc-E1-1400.jpg

 

Now that area would be really neat to redevelop as housing or even mixed use.  Particulary since one street s right on axis with the statehouse. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in agreement with those who aren't so crazy about this, so I guess gold42 is the only one that likes it. I don't see why we can't have all midrise residential downtown, since it's really the only place we have for that. I don't know how familiar you are with Columbus, but even our urban neighborhoods are low-density with plenty of single family homes w/ small yards (hence the high amount of attention the Urban Oasis development has recieved). The city and developers could throw their weight around at poorer neighborhoods like Franklinton or King-Lincoln and build midrise places whether they want them or not, but buildings/homes will have to be demolished to make way for these developments, while downtown has plenty of surface lots begging to be put to good, higher-density, uses. I'll be doing what Brewmaster is doing, but first, which downtown organization is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Columbusite, it is two blocks we are talking about here, and two blocks that don't have a whole lot going on right now.  This development would help feed customers into the restaurants on Gay St after people go home on weekdays, and on weekends.  This development would provide greenspace and a pedestrian friendly environment.  I don't see why ALL DT development has to be mid-rises.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The downtown commision, they have their meeting this morning!

 

The public is welcome and hopefully we can come and say our 2cents regarding this project. 

 

Today (11/21/06) tuesday the commission will be reviewing this project and giving it the green or hopefully red light.

 

Here is the address where tomorrows downtown commission meeting will be held...

 

8:30am

109 N front St. Dept. of Dev. 1st floor hearing room

Kind of late notice huh, but if your up and see this head to the meeting tomorrow before the 1st hearing.

 

 

Also you may

contact Steve Cochrun in the Downtown Development Office at 614-645-6305

Give the dept. a call that's better than no action.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't see why we can't have all midrise residential downtown, since it's really the only place we have for that.

 

Riversouth has been designated the residential midrise area of downtown by the all-mighty Nationwide Realty Investors. Also, there's just too much empty space downtown to be picky about what's built on these lots. Yes, I would like to see multi-story structures built there, but with mid-rise residential already planned for Riversouth, and the still overbearing amount of surface space in the downtown area, I don't think we can afford to scrutinize this too much, and possibly scare off any other potential development downtown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this is nice and I agree that not all housing should be mid-rise condo buildings, simply because I think DT is just too big geographically to fill with that style of development. Also, Gay St closer to high is a nice group of buildings that are all about 5-6 stories tall at the most, aside from the Renaissance Hotel. It looks nice to have low rise there, why wouldn't look good to have it further down?

 

Also, I just think it's unrealistic to assume that all of the Inner Belt is going to fill with mid-rise condo/apt buildings. There could/should/(and I think) will be a lot of those kinds of buildings, but not every square block is going to fill with that style of development. I've read many times that DT Columbus is geographically larger than the area of the Loop in Chicago...unless Columbus is going to explode in the near future, i think we can spare a few blocks of what appears to be attractive development on a human scale, which is what is already there on Gay St.

 

In response to the "slippery-slope" of taking what you can get downtown, I have mixed feelings. True, I think that just taking what anyone will throw at you is bad, because that's exactly why DT is what it is now. That being said, a little dose of reality is healthy too. We're not going to wake up anytime soon and see Columbus look like Vancouver (the lack of a port, navigable water, and economic ties to China guaranteeing that). So what is the solution? Things like this proposed Gay St. development. It's not ranch-style homes and parking-in-front stores on High and Broad; no one's gonna tear down Rhodes Tower and replace it with a Pizza Hut/Taco Bell-combo drive-in. Gay St. between 4th and 6th is an appropriate location for this sort of development, and shouldn't be dismissed because of people's pipedreams about having Columbus be a city of green glass high-rise condos. The city can definitely spare a few blocks for attractive urban housing that fits with the nature of the street it's on. That's my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this is nice and I agree that not all housing should be mid-rise condo buildings, simply because I think DT is just too big geographically to fill with that style of development.

 

Bingo.  Downtown has PLENTY of space (let me say that again...PLENTY of space) to build your midrise condos and highrises.  I do not see a problem building urban within a downtown with townhouses, as long as it's done correctly.  There are many downtowns that have older and newer townhouses in the heart of the core (Baltimore, Cincinnati [Garfield Park/Lytle Park], and even Los Angeles).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that Columbus has plenty of space for building mid-rise residential buildings but I also agree with Brewmaster in that this is far too close to the Urban Core.  While reading this, I was imagining a new Dominion, Homewood, M/I, Centex Homes development being plopped right in the middle of Downtown.  I don't like that idea.  I think we would all agree on that being a bad thing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see whats wrong with that; Cincinnati has a lot of rows of 2-3 story buildings remaining in the central business district and it looks great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well of course it looks great, those buildings date back to the 17-1800s and have character oozing out of every column and cornice. It's nearly impossible for any new-build, no matter how truly it can recreate past styles, to live up to that. However that is my greatest concern regarding this project. The developer says they want to evoke the architectural style of some of the country's greatest urban neighborhoods. If they can truly make good on that promise and create a dense, urban neighborhood with lasting aesthetic characteristics, then I see no problem with its construction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not directed at anyone in particular, just a thought that was provoked while reading: So because Columbus doesn't have older urban housing, should the city just not bother to build anything because it would be "fake"? At one point those townhomes in Cincinnati were characterless new housing. Yeah, they have always had architectural value, but that doesn't give them character. Character is something they gained over time. Everything has to start somewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Columbus has older urban housing...it's just called German Village.

 

Hell, the building I live in was built in the 1870's.

 

I simply think that any development that close to the city's core needs to have more than 125 residences per city block.  I wonder if that even supports one restaurant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I agree with Brewmaster that it is kind of close to the heart of the CBD for the density that they are proposing, I think it is much more important that there will be something with some density located there instead of surface parking lots. There is so much open space in Downtown, it will probably be 100 years before it fills in. And when it does, they can just tear down the low density stuff and build taller. But in the meantime, I would rather see a pedestrian friendly downtown that is all connected together with well designed, well planned, urban infill. Right now downtown is not a bunch of buildings with a few parking lots, it is a giant surface parking lot with a few buildings floating around.

 

Anyway, I think the more important arguement is not if this proposal is dense enough, but is this a well designed project that will be built in a responsible and sustainable manner. I don't think that can be determined with one, glossed up artistic rendering of an idyllic street scene. I want to see plans, elevations, construction details before I make my decision. I hope the city commision feels the same way. I really hope they break the blocks down further and have units facing the main streets as well as the alleys, creating smaller scaled quite back streets to stroll through like Beacon Hill in Boston. Parking can be contained underground. The buildings need to be built with real stone, brick, and concrete; not the fake looking plaster coated foam they use in Easton and elsewhere. There needs to be street trees lining all of the sidewalks and even the alleyways where there is room. I could keep going, but you get the idea.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I'm really concerned about is whether several future developments will look like this one. If they make up a small minority of residences, then it won't be a problem. I just get a negative reaction because when I was in Spain, cities I lived in were closer to the size of Dayton and even they didn't have lower-density housing like this in their cores. Just about everything was 4/5 stories tall. For example:

 

Granada, pop. 230,000

800px-2006_0405_141144AA.JPG

 

Santander pop. 180,000

800px-Santander.Plaza.Ca%C3%B1adio.jpg

 

(Images from Wikipedia)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Granada looks beautiful. I think 4+ stories would be appropriate. I think it would be great if they did a little bit of research on the type of buildings that use to exist in downtown Columbus and model the architectural styles somewhat after that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that idea too, like you said, they wouldn't look exactly the same. One place I'd like to see come around is the Market Exchange District. A handful of businesses with very modern looking buildings have popped up sharing a similar style and it would actually be an interesting neighborhood if the area were filled with this type of development. But as of now there are too few of those structures, too many parking lots, too few people living there, and without the Green line (streetcars) which would have been on the periphery, I'll probably be an old man before it becomes a place of interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

COLUMBUS DOWNTOWN HOUSING INVESTMENT FUND GRANTS $2 MILLION LOAN TO EDWARDS HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

 

press release

(Columbus) – A dynamic, emerging Downtown neighborhood received a big boost today with a $2 million, low-interest, three-year loan from the Columbus Downtown Housing Investment Fund, which is a private housing­financing fund managed by Columbus Downtown Development Corporation (CDDC) and Capitol South Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation. The loan will finance the Edwards Companies’ development of 250 condominium homes planned for a 6.5 acre site situated generally north of Gay, east of Fourth, south of Long and west of Grant.

 

“Downtown's progress continues as more and more developers and buyers see the advantages of urban living, bringing another unique project closer to reality,” said Mayor Michael B. Coleman. “Edwards Companies’ vision for these condos is beautiful.  The new homes will erase acres of parking lots and bring a great mix of affordable, market rate units to the area.”

 

The Edwards Companies development is one of the largest ever announced as part of the Downtown Business Plan launched in 2002, boosting the total number of units built to over the 4,000 mark. Edwards plans a phased construction of approximately 50 units per year for five years with prices starting at $150,000. Edwards plans to build one-story, garden flats on the ground level with townhomes on the upper floors, in a style popular in Chicago’s Lincoln Park and New York’s Murray Hill neighborhoods.

 

A land swap between Capitol South and the Edwards Companies will give Edwards the ability to develop a marketing center on the corner of Fourth and Gay Streets.

 

“This project will add a completely new element to the Downtown residential market.  In place of deteriorating surface parking lots will be an attractive new neighborhood that will complement the emerging Gay Street residential cluster, CCAD, Columbus State, and other area neighbors,” said Lawrence L. Fisher, President, CDDC.

 

The $15 million Columbus Downtown Housing Investment Fund works in tandem with a similar fund created by Capitol South. Together the funds provide low­cost, short- and long-term capital for residential development, particularly for those projects that need additional dollars beyond traditional bank financing. To date the funds have played a key role in several Downtown housing projects including ConneXtions Lofts, The Renaissance, The Commons at Grant, The Terraces, One West Rich, and others.

 

Columbus Downtown Development Corporation is a private, non-profit development corporation created to realize a visionary, community plan to make Downtown Columbus among the most attractive center cities in the United States. The Board consists of senior business and institutional leaders who have a strong commitment to Downtown revitalization.

 

Posted by Paul Bonneville on December 1, 2006

 

http://columbusretrometro.typepad.com/columbus_retrometro/2006/12/columbus_downto.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FIRST PHASE OF GAY STREET PROJECT

A different approach

Three-story picture sign will hide construction of new type of Downtown condo, developer says

Saturday,  June 16, 2007 3:30 AM

By Mike Pramik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Jeff Edwards thought big when he set out to build a neighborhood Downtown, buying nine blocks worth of surface parking lots on which Edwards Cos. intends to build 260 condominiums. Now that construction has begun, Edwards is thinking big again. This weekend, his company is putting up a three-story advertising sign that will show how one of the condo buildings will look. The area in front of the sign, at the northeast corner of 4th and Gay streets, will be landscaped. When the sign comes down late this year, the landscaping will accent the actual building.

 

"We thought it made a lot more sense than putting up two sheets of plywood with the names of the bank, the engineer, the architects and the project on them," Edwards said.  There could be more risk in the project behind the sign. Edwards Cos. is planning to spend nearly $100 million to build the development, which will include about a dozen styles of condos and townhouses as well as green space in what had been a sea of concrete.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/business-story.php?story=dispatch/2007/06/16/20070616-E1-01.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say "suburbia" but I think its dumb to try and create a village there. If they're going to do that, I'd like to see something like Victorian Village but with almost no setbacks.

 

Edit: Thats weird...it looks much less dense from the birds eye view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a very abrupt change from Downtown's skyscrapers, for sure.  I think I'd like it, if it was either done outside the Innerbelt, or maybe on the outer southside of downtown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Edwards said that by employing residential construction methods, such as wood frames instead of steel frames, costs can be better contained.

 

Hmm...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Edwards said that by employing residential construction methods, such as wood frames instead of steel frames, costs can be better contained.

Columbus is not Cleveland!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey David, 

 

I like the scale, density, and use of green space in this development, though I'm not sure what you mean by " Columbus is not Cleveland! "  Can you please explain?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Construction update on the Edwards Companies Gay Street Neighborhood development from Brewmaster's Cap City Savvy blog.

 

Direct link:  http://capcitysavvy.com/2007/08/13/construction-update-gay-st-neighborhood/

 

Construction Update: Gay St. Neighborhood

So I’m on the record as being critical of this “neighborhood”, but I’m getting over it.  It is what it is.

 

Part of me is waiting to open up the paper and read that Jeff Edwards, the developer, has caved in to criticism from bloggers and has decided that there will be a few 5 and 6 story buildings full of cheap flats.  We can always dream.

 

Anyway, there’s a lot of low/medium-density neighborhood building going on behind the faux housing billboard.  Here are some pics…

 

1086069147_157ccc1020.jpg

 

Note the scale of this neighborhood next to the 34 story, 438 ft. tall Borden Building next door.

 

1086073611_e0e1185792.jpg

 

1086933828_69b03fb854.jpg

 

1086935900_da92f1f502.jpg

 

1086937356_39290c702d.jpg

 

Nobody can argue that it’s not an upgrade over what was there though.  Bring on the progress!

 

~ by Eric on August 13, 2007.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the vast/large amounts of surface parking are being overtaken by too much low density housing.  That is a huge area based on the website that appears as though it will have 2 to 3 story buildings on it.  Must have bought the properties extremely cheap to be able to go that low density in the downtown area. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another photo update and progress report for the Edwards Companies Gay Street residential development - this one from Columbus RetroMetro.  

 

Here's the link to the site:  http://columbusretrometro.typepad.com/

 

Photo of the Day: Bricks and Boulevards

This series was taken a week and a half ago but since I drive by the site almost daily, I felt the need to share some more progress on the NeighborhoodLaunch.com project on Gay Street. I wasn't aware they'd be moving so quickly. One newsworthy note is that they are reusing the brick for the building they just demolished (hence the picture of the brick piles which are currently being sorted and stacked a couple block to the north on Long St.)

 

dscn0461.jpg

 

 

dscn0468.jpg

 

 

dscn0471.jpg

 

 

The following are some shots of the medians that are currently under construction on Gay St. as part of the process of returning the street to two-way traffic. Again, these shots are a week+ old and now the medians have dirt in them. Things are moving along.

 

dscn0464.jpg

 

dscn0465_2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×