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Findlay: Random Development and News

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Link contains photos.  From the 4/22/07 Blade:

 

Hog farm plans breed anxiety

Heath issues, lack of permits cause outcry

By JENNIFER FEEHAN

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

ARCADIA, Ohio - Across Hancock County, 20,000 hogs are being raised on small traditional farms and in highly mechanized confinement barns with 1,000 or more hogs each.

 

None, though, has raised a public outcry like a Cass Township farmer's plans to breed and raise nearly 7,500 hogs in three facilities on his family's land just northeast of Findlay. Concerned about negative health and environmental effects, some neighbors contend that farmer Cecil Boes, Jr., is sidestepping the law by configuring the hog operation so that he does not need to obtain state permits.

 

Mr. Boes, 52, disputes the allegation, saying that two of his five children - his 25-year-old son and 22-year-old daughter - are interested in farming and would each be the sole proprietors of separate, 2,450-head finishing barns, where hogs are raised for slaughter.

 

Full article: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NEWS17/704220336/-1/RSS08

 

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A new look for Dorney Plaza under discussion

Findlay Courier, 5/2/07

 

Dorney Plaza may have a new look in the future as city and county officials are discussing transforming it into an area that's easier to use, easier to maintain and more attractive.  The Hancock County Commissioners met with Findlay Mayor Tony Iriti, Hancock Park District Director Tim Brugeman and Findlay Service Director Mike Sobczyk to discuss the possibilities of redesigning the plaza.

 

Commissioner Ed Ingold said any changes should involve the city.  "We basically share the plaza," he said, "So whatever we do will end up being joint participation."  Officials wanted the park district involved too. In fact, Ingold and Brugeman have been discussing the future of Dorney Plaza for a while now.

 

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From the 5/15/07 Findlay Courier:

 

Zoning laws can't block megafarms, officials say

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

 

Would zoning laws keep a large-scale hog farm -- or any other megafarm -- from locating in rural Hancock County?  No, local officials say.  There is no “megafarm” zoning classification yet in Ohio, said Assistant Hancock County Prosecutor K.C. Collette.

 

So an operation like Cecil Boes’ proposed hog megafarm, slated for Cass Township, can be located in any area of the county that is zoned for agriculture, or in any unzoned area, just like any other farm, Collette said.  Cass Township, in fact, is zoned, and there’s nothing in the township’s zoning law that would keep out Boes’ hog farm.

 

“I don’t think zoning is going to change megafarms hardly at all,” said Jerry Wolford, president of the Hancock County Township Trustees Association.

 

MORE: http://www.thecourier.com/Issues/2007/May/ar_news_051507.asp#story3

 

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From the 6/4/07 Findlay Courier:

 

Developer marketing shopping center site

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

 

At the shopping mall industry's recent convention in Las Vegas, the hundreds of potential sites on display included a field on the northwest edge of Findlay.  The 58 acres southwest of the intersection of Interstate 75 and County Road 99 is the proposed site of a large shopping center.  Potential tenants for the proposed "Findlay Town Center" are being sought by Developers Diversified Realty (DDR) of Beachwood, Ohio. DDR hopes to build and open the shopping center within a couple of years.

 

Target and Kroger have been rumored as potential anchors for the center, which also would include 12 specialty retail stores and restaurants.  However, a Target spokesman in Minneapolis said Friday that the chain has no plans to locate one of its discount department stores in Findlay.  Kroger did not return phone calls asking about its plans.

 

More at http://www.thecourier.com/Issues/2007/Jun/ar_news_060407.asp#story2

 

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From The Courier

 

Developer: $90 million city project going ahead

 

 

By JOHN GRABER

 

STAFF WRITER

 

It looks like a proposed $90 million Findlay Towne Center development is really going to happen.

 

“I think you’ll probably see some work on the site in December but the actual site development probably won’t start until February,” said Brad Burgess, president of Lexington, Ky.-based Thayer Group.

 

Contact staff writer John Graber at: (419) 427-8417 johngraber@thecourier.com

 

I am glad this project is going forward. This project is right in DT Findlay (although not on Main St.). I am really interested in seeing the design, so hopefully some details are given in the coming weeks. I just have one question: How does the projects cost go from $58 million to $90 million when all of the estimated construction has stayed the same AND they are NOT building a 90K county library that was originally envisioned?

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Looks like the housing component shrunk from 400 units to 400 beds as well.  Unless the retail component really takes off, this place might be vacant in the evening hours.

 

Do they have a baseball team yet?  1,200 seats is pretty tiny.  Like High School sized.  It's way smaller than OSU's small baseball stadium at almost 4,500 seats.

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I just want to see some renderings and a location map. When I was in Findlay last month, I didn't particularily notice any huge vacant lots downtown.

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I believe that the stadium will be for the University of Findlay's baseball team. Also, I just played in a softball tournament at Swale park this past weekend,so I believe that they will just build stands around one of the diamonds already on that site. They have not released any renderings yet, but I would assume if they are going to start construction in December they will release them soon. The site is not directly off N. Main St, you have to go down one of the side streets to get there.

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From The Courier

 

Findlay councilmen cautious about Towne Center project

 

 

By JOHN GRABER

 

STAFF WRITER

 

The $90 million Findlay Towne Center multi-use development, planned for the former Brandman tire dump and Swale Park, was put on hold Tuesday night until at least one public meeting can be held to describe the development to city residents.

 

Contact staff writer John Graber at: (419) 427-8417 johngraber@thecourier.com

 

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Findlay, Ohio - February 2008

  • County seat of Hancock County.
  • The population was 38,967 at the 2000 census.
  • It is home to The University of Findlay.
  • The city's official nickname is "Flag City, USA".
  • Findlay is the headquarters of the Cooper Tire & Rubber Company, founded in 1914.
  • Findlay was also the longtime headquarters of the Marathon Oil Corporation, from 1905 until 1990. Marathon is now based in Houston, Texas, but still maintains operations in Findlay under an organized subsidiary, the Marathon Petroleum Company.
  • Downtown has suffered major flooding in August 2007 and February 2008.

Source: Wikipedia

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay.JPG&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay00.jpg&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay01.jpg&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay011.JPG&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay02.jpg&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay021.JPG&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay08.jpg&p=*full-image

 

index.php?album=Northwest+Ohio%2FFindlay&image=Findlay080.jpg&p=*full-image

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I do and I don't like Findlay.  Findlay has an active downtown for its size and seems relatively healthy along with having some very nice Victorian housing along the edge of downtown so that's a plus.  The broad street for the city, though, makes the town feel very empty/inaccessible and I'm not really blown away by the courthouse (in this state, courthouses have high standards, so...).


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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^I noticed the same thing about the street. Some streetscaping could really help that; Lebanon has a 4 lane main street (called Broad), but they've softened it pretty well. Hamilton went with boulevards/center medians and curb extentions into the parking lane at intersections, which has also been effective. Just making the outer lanes parking would be a big help.

 

I can't say anything negative about the courthouse, however. It reminds me of Auglaize County's (Wapakoneta), which I really like.

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Zoning change sought by ProMedica is denied

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081113/NEWS16/811130256

 

The Marion Township Zoning Commission has denied a rezoning request for a ProMedica medical complex, although township trustees will have the final say on the matter when they meet Nov. 24.  The commission voted 5-2 Tuesday to deny Toledo’s ProMedica Health System’s application to rezone 25 acres along U.S. 224 east of Findlay from agricultural to general business.

 

While ProMedica has declined to say exactly what type of facility it would build, the zoning it is seeking would permit construction of a hospital.  The Hancock Regional Planning Commission last month recommended the land be rezoned to allow for medical offices, but not a hospital.

 

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This affects the Findlay area, since it has been hit hard by flooding in recent years.

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081129/NEWS16/811290369/-1/NEWS

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Article published November 29, 2008

 

Areas along Blanchard River prone to flooding to become grassland

Ottawa, U.S. agency reach an agreement

By JENNIFER FEEHAN

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

OTTAWA, Ohio - In a unique agreement between the village of Ottawa and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, three flood-prone areas along the Blanchard River - including land that was devastated by August, 2007, flooding - are to be returned to native grassland habitat.

 

A total of 47 acres, including much of what was a rundown trailer park along West Main Street, will be turned into natural areas ripe for bird-watching, hiking, and environmental-education programs.

 

Contact Jennifer Feehan at:

jfeehan@theblade.com

 

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Challenges greet Findlay's new chief of development

Cooper Tire, agency funding cuts on agenda

Article published December 8, 2008

By JENNIFER FEEHAN

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

FINDLAY - Before Ray DeWinkle was even on the payroll as GreaterFindlay Inc.'s new president and chief executive officer, he was in a town meeting with Cooper Tire about the future of its Findlay manufacturing plant.  With 19 years experience in economic development in Grand Rapids, Mich., Mr. DeWinkle knows retention and expansion of existing business is at least two-thirds of the job. Retaining Cooper Tire and the 1,100 manufacturing jobs it provides in Findlay, has been his No. 1 priority.

 

On the job officially just three weeks, Mr. DeWinkle walked into a debate among city and county officials over just how effective GreaterFindlay - a combination of the community development foundation, the chamber of commerce, and the convention and visitors bureau - has been and whether the city was getting a good return on its investment in the public-private organization.

 

FULL ARTICLE: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081208/BUSINESS03/812080343

 

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Future use of Central Auditorium debated

By DENISE GRANT, Staff Writer

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

 

Central Auditorium got mixed reviews on Monday from the performers who use it, but most said Findlay should keep it.  About 15 people attended a meeting hosted by a committee working to save the old auditorium.  They sat on the stage, each giving their opinion about the future use of the auditorium.  Also in attendance was Findlay Schools Superintendent Dean Wittwer, city Auditor Robert Sprague and Findlay Councilman Randy Van Dyne.

 

Central Middle School, 200 W. Main Cross St., was originally built as a high school in 1924, with the auditorium being added in 1939.  The school sits on four acres of land in downtown Findlay.  The building, which served as Findlay High School until the early '60s, will be closed to students by the city school board in 2013.

 

City government is considering acquiring the Central building from the school board, with the goal of converting it into a downtown civic center.  The city is considering moving its health department to the building.  School officials have said they need office space there, and the Hancock County commissioners also have been asked to commit to using office space at Central.  Sprague said it will take the commitment of all three "anchor tenants" for the project to move forward.

 

MORE: http://www.thecourier.com/Issues/2010/Oct/19/ar_news_101910_story3.asp?d=101910_story3,2010,Oct,19&c=n

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School board: Many options for Central building, property

By DENISE GRANT, Staff Writer

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

 

Findlay school board may have a "plan B" for the future use of Central Middle School that would allow the building to be developed into a civic center without the need for a change in ownership.  During the school board's regular meeting Monday, board member Jeff Shrader said the schools could keep the Central building until at least 2016, move school offices into the building, and also lease space to the city government. 

 

A plan first made public by city officials earlier this month called for Findlay to take ownership of the school building and then set up a condo arrangement for other government and community groups.  Shrader, however, questioned the need for the school board to pay condos fees, as much as $190,000 a year, to occupy office space in a building the school board already owns.

 

Central Middle School is expected to be closed to students in January 2013, when two new middle schools open.  Central Middle School was originally built as a high school in 1924, with the auditorium being added in 1939.  The school sits on four acres in downtown Findlay.  The building served as Findlay High School until the early 1960s.

 

MORE: http://www.thecourier.com/Issues/2010/Oct/26/ar_news_102610_story1.asp?d=102610_story1,2010,Oct,26&c=n

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Frpom the 2/3/14 Findlay Courier:

 

Marathon Petroleum announces $80 downtown expansion

 

Findlay’s downtown will get a major boost in the next three years thanks to Marathon Petroleum Corp.

 

Marathon CEO Gary Heminger announced Monday that the company will spend $80 million to add two office buildings to its complex, two multi-story employee parking garages, and green space.

 

Down the road, Marathon may add a combination corporate hotel/mixed use building on Main Street, Heminger said.

 

http://thecourier.com/breaking-news/2014/02/03/marathon-petroleum-announces-expansion/

 

 

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I don't think this is bad at all for urban infill, but aren't there some historic buildings on the block?

 

*This does look like an incredible project for a city the size of Findlay. You don't see this much in Ohio's big cities...

 

**Upon viewing Google Streetview, it looks like the site is mostly surface lots. The two buildings I was thinking of do look historic, but not all that impressive. This plan is a big improvement and expands density south along Main in Findlay. It's a huge win for the city and absolutely shocking to see this kind of project and vision in a small town. Well done, Marathon. Findlay does have an excellent downtown for a city its size, and this only makes it better.

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Very impressive for a city of its size. Now why the heck isn't there more development talk/streetscaping?!

 

Findlay now firing on all cylinders

 

"Findlay and Hancock County are coming off a year in which a number of companies announced or completed significant development projects that will add hundreds of jobs.

 

McLane Co. Inc., a Texas grocery supplier, announced it would spend $119 million on a distribution center. Marathon Petroleum Corp., which last year was No. 25 on the Fortune 500 list, embarked on an $80 million expansion of its downtown headquarters. Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. moved ahead with a $40 million project to build a global technology center next to its headquarters.

 

Based on those investments and others, Site Selection magazine named Findlay as the most active small city in the United States for development projects last year. The magazine counted 20 new or expanded corporate facilities that involved an investment of at least $1 million, added at least 20 jobs, or created 20,000 square feet of new corporate space."

 

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/Economy/2015/03/22/Findlay-now-firing-on-all-cylinders.html#QyvU130RvExdAtmf.99

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Even before the collapse of the auto industry and the Great Recession decimated Northwest Ohio, Findlay was always an outlier. Its economy was not only stronger than the region, but most of the state of Ohio.

 

It's a small town in the middle of nowhere, but somehow lands a lot of investment. It also has always had a very stable population in a region with more than its fair share of comparable cities that have declined immensely (Lima, Mansfield, etc.).

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Marathon Petroleum opens expanded headquarters in downtown Findlay

 

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A recently completed expansion of the Marathon Petroleum Corporation headquarters was unveiled in Findlay Thursday.

 

Findlay Mayor Lydia Milhalik praised the $90 million investment as proof of Marathon’s commitment to not only Findlay, but the region.

 

“It’s been a real boost for us. We’ve done some amazing things downtown because of what they’ve been able to contribute here and we’re thankful that we have a company like Marathon in the heart of downtown Findlay," said Mayor Milhalik.

 

More below:

http://m.wtol.com/toledonewsnow/db/347256/content/6KdE3mAd


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Major expansion for Marathon Petroleum Corporation in Findlay

 

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Marathon Petroleum Corporation is more than halfway complete with its multi-million dollar expansion projects in Findlay.

 

Don Malarky, the Project Manager on the campus expansion, said construction started between South Main Street and East Avenue in May of 2014.

 

More below:

http://www.13abc.com/content/news/Major-expansion-for-Marathon-Petroleum-Corporation-in-Findlay-392102571.html


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Marathon’s MPLX opens headquarters

 

b6mplx-2.jpg

 

Amid a gathering of company executives, employees, and local dignitaries, Marathon Petroleum Corp. entered a new phase in its brief history on Thursday with the official grand opening of a grandiose new headquarters building for its MPLX LP subsidiary, part of a $90-million expansion of the oil refining company’s footprint in downtown Findlay.

 

“Our headquarters has undertaken quite a transformation,” said Marathon’s Chief Executive Gary Heminger as he stood at a podium in one of the building’s many conference rooms.

 

More below:

http://www.toledoblade.com/business/2016/09/02/Marathon-s-MPLX-opens-headquarters.html


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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