Jump to content
Guest KJP

Road Diets / Highway Removal

Recommended Posts

They re-built lake rd in Rocky River just a couple years ago.

 

the community input when planning the rebuild was against bike lanes.  you are stuck with what is there for a long time.

 

But a long time might mean 10 years and not never.

 

 

http://www.cleveland.com/rocky-river/index.ssf/2013/09/rocky_river_seeking_grant_for.html

 

http://www.cleveland.com/lakewood/index.ssf/2014/03/lakewood_group_asks_city_state.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Severe snowstorms have a remarkable way of revealing the portion of roadways we actually use for vehicles, and what parts could be converted to non-vehicular public uses....

 

With #snowmaggedon2016 the big story, it seems like a good time to discuss the #sneckdown concept. HT @BrooklynSpoke

CZg2OEjUAAAnaCD.jpg:large

 

While that's certainly true in a lot of cases, some sneckdowns would make it difficult for delivery trucks, emergency vehicles and of course snowplows to get through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buffalo!

Last  week's best news: "Cuomo announces $40m plan to remove Robert Moses Parkway North" https://t.co/hTfEJCNWpT https://t.co/rn9ku4tclb


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Study Considers Removing Dallas Freeway | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://t.co/EarhNvhkVV via @nbcdfw


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why cars and cities are a bad match.

By Jarrett Walker March 2

 

Cars don’t work well in cities, and the reason is simple: 1) A city is a place where people live close together, so there’s not much space per person. 2) Cars take up a lot of space per person. 3) Therefore, cities quickly run out of room for cars.

 

This problem is called congestion. When it happens, a city’s options are to:

 

(A) Stop growing — because congestion has become terrible and growth will make it worse.

 

(B) Widen streets. This requires huge amounts of land, and land in cities is very expensive. What’s more, if you tear down enough buildings to widen streets, you are effectively destroying your city in order to save it.

 

© Focus on helping people get around using less space than cars require — through walking, cycling and mass transit.

 

Given the options, it’s not surprising that urban leaders — regardless of political ideology — eventually decide that C is the only real answer.

 

MORE:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-theory/wp/2016/03/02/buses-and-trains-thats-what-will-solve-congestion/?tid=ss_tw

 


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oakland is currently discussing the removal of I-980. It's one of those short connector freeways that was likely designed to cut off the slums of West Oakland from Downtown. Now that West Oakland is hyper-gentrified, people want it to be connected with Downtown again.

 

*The freeway was always pointless no matter the era. It's obvious it was built as an "infrastructure wall" more than anything else. Judging by crime in Oakland's urban core neighborhoods, it was completely ineffective. It's time to get rid of the freeway! A 500-foot wide swath of land could contain quite a lot of housing, and having a second Transbay Tube on BART land here would not be a bad idea (if the Jack London Square-Alameda proposal doesn't pan out). I also think something should be done to soften the blow of I-880, which cuts off Downtown Oakland from Jack London Square. I know it's not realistic to tear out I-880 since it's one of the busiest freeways in the nation and carries Port of Oakland traffic, but it's a barrier keeping potential tourists out of Oakland's only public waterfront. I think a bunch of high-rises should be built around I-880 in Oakland like San Francisco is doing with I-80 and the Bay Bridge approach ramps.

 

Oakland moving in right direction with idea to replace I-980

By John KingNovember 14, 2015 Updated: November 19, 2015 8:45am

 

The rebirth of the Embarcadero and Hayes Valley in San Francisco shows how a city and its neighborhoods can flourish after the removal of intrusive, invasive freeways.

 

Now Oakland has the potential to see such addition by subtraction — a move that, down the road, could even pay benefits for the region as a whole.

 

The freeway that has outstayed its welcome is Interstate 980, a broad swath of landscaped asphalt that separates residential West Oakland from the city’s downtown. With imaginative engineering and design, it could be replaced by a boulevard lined with housing at all price levels, reknitting the urban landscape.

 

Another dimension to the what-if scenario: Such a conversion could include space for BART beneath the boulevard, a tunnel that could connect to a second BART tube from Oakland to San Francisco.

 

None of this will happen overnight, and other paths for BART 2.0 might turn out to make more sense if such an ambitious expansion is pursued. But I-980 is a relic ripe for change, and its future shouldn’t be taken for granted. Instead, a reconceived roadway needs to be part of the discussion as the Bay Area begins to wrestle with the question of how our region will function and evolve in decades to come.

 

“It’s not just a nice planning theory, it’s an equity issue and a transportation opportunity,” said Matt Nichols, a policy director for Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf. “Some agency that’s going to be around for multiple terms needs to say this is on the agenda.”

 

The concept of turning I-980 from a divisive motorway into common ground has been pushed for the past year by a handful of local architects and planners with good intentions but little clout. However, the idea is gaining traction within Oakland’s City Hall. Mayor Schaaf stressed the idea of “vibrant sustainable infrastructure” in her State of the City address this month, and the city has requested $5.2 million from the Alameda County Transportation Authority to begin planning studies of an I-980 conversion and a second BART tube.

 

Simple common sense

 

Getting rid of a freeway in an often-gridlocked region might sound foolhardy — it took the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake to nudge San Francisco to raze the elevated freeways along the Embarcadero and through Hayes Valley that neighbors hated but drivers relied on. That’s also true with the Cypress Freeway in West Oakland, which collapsed during Loma Prieta and was replaced eventually by Mandela Boulevard.

 

With I-980, though, the notion of a fresh look is simple common sense.

 

The artery was conceived to serve a second Bay Bridge that would touch down near Hunters Point in San Francisco, but voters rejected the plan in the early 1970s. By then more than 40 acres in the string of blocks between Brush and Castro streets had been acquired and partially cleared. The argument for the thoroughfare was repackaged as the salvation of downtown Oakland.

 

CONTINUED (great article detailing freeway removals in the Bay)

http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Oakland-moving-in-right-direction-with-idea-to-6633056.php

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

US-DOT is sponsoring an "Every Place Counts" challenge, where cities can propose changes that remove highways to to heal neighborhoods "difurcated" by past transportation mistakes.

https://www.transportation.gov/opportunity/challenge

 

- Encourage communities to reimagine existing transportation projects via innovative and restorative infrastructure design that corrects past mistakes; reconnects people and neighborhoods to opportunity; and reinvigorates opportunity within communities.

- Empower communities and decision-makers to work together to develop context-sensitive design solutions that reflect and incorporate

 

Anyone have some obvious winners to try proposing a regional govt to make a case?

In Columbus, I'm thinking I-71 is a divisive boundary. Everything West of it is quite nice (i.e. Short North, Clintonville, OSU, Worthington), and to the East is "in transition" (Old Town East, Franklin Park, Linden). Perhaps you could make a "big dig", and put 71 under a park.

 

In Cleveland, I'm not too familiar with everything to know of specific dividing lines. For economic redevelopment, I'd like to see the shoreway from Burke to Edgewater downgraded to a boulevard with intersections, (stop lights / roundabouts), pedestrian crossings, and mixed use development build along it. Then, perhaps see how you can incorporate some "Group Plan" into the redo. (i.e. maybe extend to the mall to Amtrak, and it be a park-bridge overtop of the new shoreway?). Also move the shoreway out of Flats West Bank, and run it from Browns to Wendy Park/Edgewater/Lakewood. I don't know if you could have a bridge that goes up and down, like the train bridge there, or if you'd have to tunnel under the Cuyahoga. The current shoreway It divides downtown from the waterfront, it cuts apart Warehouse district, it cuts apart Flats East Bank, it cuts apart Flats West Bank, it stops Ohio City from expanding north, its cuts off Edgewater from the neighborhoods south of it. I'll pretend that I've been living under a rock for the past year, and haven't noticed all the shoreway conversion they've been doing. (We have an undo button right?). (I agree with spirit, but I would take the shoreway conversion further).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, I've stumbled a site advocating for narrowing streets in SF, and then putting a new row of buildings in between.

http://narrowstreetssf.com/mcallister/

 

I like someone else's remix of that idea a little better.

http://www.mrericsir.com/blog/local/narrow-streets-remixed/

 

Also, I've found a very cool tool that lets you whip up your own mockup for a road diet.

http://streetmix.net/

 

Change that 5 lane road to have median planters, bike lanes, street car line, parking, center turn lane, etc. So.. The next time you hear your towns safety director claim that "it won't fit", mock it up. It would be pretty nice if this could be a semi-automated data-driven process. Pull down ADT (average daily traffic), find out current widths of roads, and propose alternatives based on needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any time a Department of Transportation temporarily closes down a highway or bridge, the DOT and local media usually freak out about the impending "carmageddon". And usually they are wrong... people find another way to get around, and it's not a big deal. The latest example of this was in Seattle where the Alaskan Way Viaduct was temporarily closed for a weekend earlier this month. Seattle put a few extra buses in operation to compensate. Bike ridership also jumped for the day. And life went on.

 

Which leads me to a point that The Urbanophile made a few years ago: If You Can Repeatedly Close a Freeway For Months At a Time, Do You Really Need It At All?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

taestell[/member] - I agree! Are there specific segments in Cincinnati (or Ohio) that you'd like to see closed (or dramatically shrunk)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Montreal Trades Expressway for “Urban Boulevard”

 

Montreal has begun tearing down its part of a mid-century expressway to make way for a greener, more transit- and pedestrian-friendly boulevard, reports the Montreal Gazette. The Bonaventure Expressway, an elevated 11-lane highway built for Expo 67, will give way to the street-level Bonaventure urban boulevards, a combined nine lanes of traffic separated by a series of green spaces. Montreal’s new, $142 million entryway is scheduled for completion in mid-2017, just in time for the city’s 375th anniversary.

 

https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/montreal-tear-down-bonaventure-expressway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to see the elevated highway go... but seems strange to dedicate so much land to create a park that will be sandwiched between traffic on both sides. Will anybody actually want to hang out in that park space?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anybody have a detailed overview of the new design for the Bonaventure Expressway?

 

I found an article quoting "Projet Montreal", raising a similar concern to mine:

http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/bonaventure-expressway-remake-plans-unveiled-1.2155623

Projet Montreal isn’t as enthusiastic about the project, pointing out that it may not be as appealing as the mayor thinks.

 

“People will not want to walk around in a space surrounded by nine lane of traffic. Take Parc des Faubourgs, at the foot of the Jacques Cartier Bridge, as an example: it’s twice as wide as the proposed park and yet it is always deserted,” said Craig Sauve, the party’s transport critic, in a news release.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to see the elevated highway go... but seems strange to dedicate so much land to create a park that will be sandwiched between traffic on both sides. Will anybody actually want to hang out in that park space?

 

The park created by the Big Dig is similar.  While not a dud, it doesn't get a ton of use, and seems a bit fake. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Open space" is a cancer on most cities.  There's so much of it, and so much of it is useless, that it sucks the life out of the city.  Even in Jane Jacobs' day, before even TV was super widespread, let alone video games or the internet, she was warning about all the underutilized parks and especially the nebulous green space around housing projects and how it damaged its surroundings. 

 

The Big Dig should have been a wake-up call.  The whole point was to stitch the city back together after the highway broke it apart, but since they've not actually built anything on the land it's still a scar across downtown.  That Boston can't activate so much park/plaza shows just how much population it really takes.  They could have put two or three small parks and plazas along the route, but the rest should be filled in with buildings.  Unfortunately all anyone can conceive is "need moar greenspace!" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the most detailed drawing or the re-design that I could find:

1220-city-bonaventure-gr.jpg

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/montreal-unveils-new-plans-for-bonaventure-expressway

 

If I could have designed it, I would have shifted all the lanes to the north (towards Rue Duke), included a ~15' landscaped median to separate traffic, allow for trees, and make it easier for pedestrians to cross. And then, the opened up space to the south could be used to create developable parcels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the motivation for the big dig parks was in part to keep a huge amount of land from opening up for skyscraper construction.  A bunch of stuff has been built over I-90 in Copley Square instead of a park, and that has helped Copley Square rival DT Boston for office supremacy.  In fact, the Prudential Tower was built in Copley Square back when there was still a skyscraper ban in DT Boston enacted by the city's blue blood families who established a pact back in the 1920s to prohibit skyscrapers.  Meanwhile, the Seaport area is now a second area to rival DT Boston in thanks to the big dig extension being built completely underground in that area.  Eventually that area might surpass Copley Square as the city's #2 employment center.  That wouldn't have been possible if I-90 had been extended over the Fort Point Channel and on the surface to the Ted Williams Tunnel.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the most detailed drawing or the re-design that I could find:

1220-city-bonaventure-gr.jpg

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/montreal-unveils-new-plans-for-bonaventure-expressway

 

If I could have designed it, I would have shifted all the lanes to the north (towards Rue Duke), included a ~15' landscaped median to separate traffic, allow for trees, and make it easier for pedestrians to cross. And then, the opened up space to the south could be used to create developable parcels.

 

Your idea is great but it would be very difficult to implement. This map doesn't show the whole picture. Duke and Nazareth Sts. end just at the east side of the map and become University St. another median "boulevard" that runs through the center of commercial Montreal. Also, just at the east end of the map, the Bonaventure connects with the Ville-Marie (AutoRoute 720) that tunnels under most of the commercial district. It's a very unique and complex interchange. There is a tremendous amount of traffic that flows from the South Shore suburbs on AutoRoute 10 (the Bonaventure) and then splits between people using University and AutoRoute 720. People will be doing a lot of lane switching. These roads are being split so that it can enter/exit that configuration evenly. It's hard to explain unless you've driven this stretch of road.

 

Than being said, I'm glad to see Quebec do this and eliminate the elevated portion. They struggle to maintain existing infrastructure due to the harsh winters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This map doesn't show the whole picture. Duke and Nazareth Sts. end just at the east side of the map and become University St. another median "boulevard" that runs through the center of commercial Montreal. Also, just at the east end of the map, the Bonaventure connects with the Ville-Marie (AutoRoute 720) that tunnels under most of the commercial district. It's a very unique and complex interchange.

 

I assume you mean the west side of the map... right? It seems like you could leave those tunnel entrances alone, make minimal changes to the configuration further to the west, and still make the roadway more compact between the tunnel entrances and where the road has to begin the bridge approach (at Rue Wellington). Essentially I would take the redesigned layout and swap the green space with Rue de Nazareth. So the tunnel ramp for Rue de Nazareth would simply approach from the opposite side of the street.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This map doesn't show the whole picture. Duke and Nazareth Sts. end just at the east side of the map and become University St. another median "boulevard" that runs through the center of commercial Montreal. Also, just at the east end of the map, the Bonaventure connects with the Ville-Marie (AutoRoute 720) that tunnels under most of the commercial district. It's a very unique and complex interchange.

 

I assume you mean the west side of the map... right? It seems like you could leave those tunnel entrances alone, make minimal changes to the configuration further to the west, and still make the roadway more compact between the tunnel entrances and where the road has to begin the bridge approach (at Rue Wellington). Essentially I would take the redesigned layout and swap the green space with Rue de Nazareth. So the tunnel ramp for Rue de Nazareth would simply approach from the opposite side of the street.

 

You are right about going west. I'm left handed. Always think in reverse. Visually I'm thinking "north" anyway because AutoRoute 10 is labeled N/S through there. The ramp for AutoRoute 720 is going under the city so a simple switch isn't that easy. Like I said, it's complex.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the motivation for the big dig parks was in part to keep a huge amount of land from opening up for skyscraper construction.  A bunch of stuff has been built over I-90 in Copley Square instead of a park, and that has helped Copley Square rival DT Boston for office supremacy.  In fact, the Prudential Tower was built in Copley Square back when there was still a skyscraper ban in DT Boston enacted by the city's blue blood families who established a pact back in the 1920s to prohibit skyscrapers.  Meanwhile, the Seaport area is now a second area to rival DT Boston in thanks to the big dig extension being built completely underground in that area.  Eventually that area might surpass Copley Square as the city's #2 employment center.  That wouldn't have been possible if I-90 had been extended over the Fort Point Channel and on the surface to the Ted Williams Tunnel.

 

 

A lot of people don't remember or don't know that in the 1980s Amtrak's Northeast Corridor was put in a cut-and-cover tunnel through Back Bay and parks and recreational facilities were placed as occasional caps on top of the tunnel all the way out to Forest Hills. Much of it was the result of moving the Orange Line from an elevated line to alongside the Northeast Corridor. So unlike the Big Dig, there was now a subway line with frequent stations next to all these new parks surrounded by densely developed neighborhoods, some of which got even denser when the Orange Line was routed through them.

 

BTW, when I visited Boston last in 2013, I thought the parks above the Big Dig were fairly well used, especially near South Station and over by Quincy Market.


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How to fix the damage from in-city highways

Every time an in-city highway has been replaced by more human-scale infrastructure, the city and region has benefitted, according to transportation experts who led workshops for USDOT.

 

ROBERT STEUTEVILLE    SEP. 1, 2016

 

Transportation and planning experts Peter Park and Ian Lockwood each helped lead recent workshops for US Department of Transportation (USDOT) and the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) called the Ladders of Opportunity Every Place Counts Design Challenge.

 

The events were the first of their kind: USDOT sought to alleviate the negative impacts of in-city Interstates built in the 20th Century that divided neighborhoods and often displaced hundreds or thousands of people. Lockwood served as a leader of two-day workshops in Spokane and Nashville and Park steered workshops in Philadelphia and the Twin Cities of Minneapolis/St. Paul. The events occurred in mid-July.

 

Public Square editor Robert Steuteville interviewed Park and Lockwood about freeway caps, highway teardowns, complete streets, and what they learned from USDOT’s “Every Place Counts.”...

 

Read more at:

https://www.cnu.org/publicsquare/2016/09/01/how-fix-damage-city-highways

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another Robert Moses legacy to be erased. A highway that few motorists use yet killed downtown Niagara Falls....

 

http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/niagara-falls/cuomo-announces-40-million-plan-to-remove-robert-moses-parkway-north-20160322


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More American cities are tearing down blighted urban expressways. Help us find the next candidate: https://t.co/2WCG79fy8D


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Future of Neighborhoods: Removing Urban Freeways Gains Fresh Traction

When highways reach the end of their useful life, it is often cheaper to extract them than it is to replace or repair them.

By Pete Bigelow Sep 30, 2016

 

Growing up on the north side of Charlotte, North Carolina, Anthony Foxx remembers the geography of his childhood being defined by a quiet neighborhood of ranch-style houses, well-kept lawns—and an imposing brick wall at the end of the block.

 

On the other side of the wall, there ran a high-speed on-ramp that connected the eastbound lanes of Interstate 85 with the southbound lanes of Interstate 77, two highways that cradled the northeast corner of the neighborhood. For Foxx, the wall, the highways, and the hum of traffic blended into the background. He knew nothing different. Over time, he came to understand they weren't part of the neighborhood at all but more like interloping house guests.

 

"Those freeways were there to carry people through my neighborhood, but never to my neighborhood," said Foxx, now Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

 

MORE:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/a23121/future-of-neighborhoods-removing-urban-freeways/


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Highway Hit List

The U.S. has no shortage of urban interstates ripe for removal, and some tear-downs are already underway. But planners should tread carefully when “reconnecting” neighborhoods.

http://www.citylab.com/commute/2017/01/the-highway-hit-list/514965/?utm_source=atlfb


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So apparently a bunch of drivers in the Austin, Texas area are really upset about speed bumps being installed on city streets. They're so upset that they are protesting by honking their horn every time they go over a speed bump to annoy the neighbors. They are even creating Facebook events to encourage others to do the same.

 

Someone sent me this story with the caption: Unreal! This is like the street safety equivalent of rolling coal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid, my dad and a group of neighbors constructed a rogue speed bump under the cover of darkness one night. Think 10 or so guys, with wheel barrels, shovels, and a few dozen sacks of concrete mix (and, although I didn't see it, I imagine a cooler full of beer).  The city eventually came and ripped it out, but years later they repaved the street and put in a series of official speed humps, so I guess they got the message. I don't remember honking ever being involved at that time, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Cincinnati area, there was one instance where neighbors painted their own guerrilla crosswalk and it wasn't discovered by the city at the time. The next time the city repaved the street, they repainted the crosswalk and made it official.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once a city has built something, even something it never should have built, it can be very hard to convince said city that it doesn’t need that thing, & that the city would be much better off without it.

 

Example - most inner city freeways.

 

HT @voxdotcom https://t.co/M1LCWWmklU


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Downtown Expressway's Days Are Numbered in Detroit https://t.co/NchqkwaNxq


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once a city has built something [...] it can be very hard to convince said city that it doesn’t need that thing...

 

Kind of sad how easy it was to completely dismantle the nation's streetcar networks but how hard it is to get rid of even a short stretch of freeway.


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oakwood, an affluent streetcar suburb adjacent to Dayton, recently completed a nice road diet along Shroyer Road. It went from being 4 lanes with no turn lane to 2 travel lanes, a landscaped median/turn lane, and bike lanes on both sides of the road. They also added very visible zebra crosswalks and flashing crosswalk signs at various midblock locations along the street. The Miami Valley really has been killing it recently with improving its pedestrian and bike infrastructure - pretty much every major road rebuild that I’ve recently witnessed has involved some combination of bumpouts, lane reductions, bike lanes added, and crosswalks.


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos to advocates in Buffalo, who wouldn't settle for a highway removal plan that emphasized vehicle speeds, not people https://t.co/K1VGPPu9N8


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New York City conducted a road diet on its most dangerous street. Pedestrian injuries fell off a cliff. (Down 63%)

https://t.co/45elnIUclZ


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing thing is that it's still a horrible road. It's setup in a manner that makes movement as a pedestrian is basically impossible. Crossing it takes forever. The traffic is fast and aggressive, even with these changes. It's split into express and local lanes. The intersections are monstrous.

 

I'm glad they've had success in reducing injuries, but their method of tackling the problem doesn't do much towards giving some of the huge 200' wide ROW back to humans. I actually looked at buying several apartments in Station Square of Forest Hills Gardens (look that area up if you want to see great early 20th century planned commuter suburbanism) but hated the idea of having to get off the train along Queens BLVD and having to use stores on that road.

 

It should be turned into a more typical BLVD with driving lanes on the outside and the entirety of the center should be turned into a tree lined median with bike lanes built in and parkspace in the leftover area. There's certainly room for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...