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tykaps

Cleveland: Hough: General Development and Info

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6 hours ago, inlovewithCLE said:

Yup. If it’s not gonna be rehabbed quickly it has to come down. Shame we lost this building but it was a nuisance

 

The building was not a nuisance.  Perhaps people occupying the building were a nuisance, but you can't blame the building for that.  It most certainly could have been rehabbed with the proper investment. 

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1 hour ago, jeremyck01 said:

 

The building was not a nuisance.  Perhaps people occupying the building were a nuisance, but you can't blame the building for that.  It most certainly could have been rehabbed with the proper investment. 

If it’s attracting negative elements, it’s a nuisance. I’m from the hood in Cleveland, I know that of which I speak. These things are more pressing in those communities because of the element that’s attracted to it and the people in those communities hate it. They scream more than anybody else to tear those buildings down. Ain’t nobody got 10-15 years to wait for someone to decide for it to be rehabbed, while it brings down the look and feel of the neighborhood and attracts bad elements that people who actually live in those areas have to deal with 

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The city needs to do a better job of making sure building owners are sealing and securing vacant buildings.  There are proprietary systems out there that are very effective, but they're expensive.  Boards are cheap, but basically useless to keep people out if they want in.  The city should ride the owners of vacant buildings to make sure they are sealed effectively.

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9 hours ago, X said:

The city needs to do a better job of making sure building owners are sealing and securing vacant buildings.  There are proprietary systems out there that are very effective, but they're expensive.  Boards are cheap, but basically useless to keep people out if they want in.  The city should ride the owners of vacant buildings to make sure they are sealed effectively.

Do you realize how hard that is to do from a manpower and from a legal perspective as well? It's easier to just nuisance abatement demo it. 

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1 hour ago, KFM44107 said:

Do you realize how hard that is to do from a manpower and from a legal perspective as well? It's easier to just nuisance abatement demo it. 

That's a responsibility of property ownership. I can assure you, if the owner lived there, it would be appropriately maintained. If they can't afford to maintain their property, it should be remedied through the appropriate channels.  There are far too many slumlords and/or absent landlords (except to collect rent), who are allowed to neglect their properties.

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3 minutes ago, Frmr CLEder said:

That's a responsibility of property ownership. I can assure you, if the owner lived there, it would be appropriately maintained. If they can't afford to maintain their property, it should be remedied through the appropriate channels.  There are far too many slumlords and/or absent landlords (except to collect rent), who are allowed to neglect their properties.

I'm aware. What I'm telling you is do you know how hard it is to bring a slum landlord, particularly an out of state slum landlord to bring their property into good condition? Housing violations are criminal violations, and therefore service needs to be perfected. Best of luck with an out of state Israeli investor with a fake in state  property manager.  It's easier to nuisance abatement demo the properties and throw the cost of demo on the tax duplicate and then let them foreclose on it. 

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Boarded or not- if a building is vacant and a person really wants to get in, they'll get in. I've seen it happen too many times to count. However there are ways to board a building which makes it harder to enter than just nailing up plywood.

 

I'll have to disagree with the thought of a building not being a nuisance... You would have to have seen the Alhambra while it was standing, vacant and open to entry after years and years of neglect. Again, I'll have to dig for pics which I'll post but the folks who lived off Wade Park wanted it down for good reason. Every entry on the back of the building was open and anyone could just walk in (the building could have been used in a movie depicting a post-war apocalypse- which is a shame in itself).  Yes that falls on the owner- but the building itself became a magnet for crime. If the building was boarded- the boards were removed quickly. If new windows were installed (and they were on this building at one point), they would quickly be broken out. It came to a point that after years and years of it sitting, it eventually attracted things which nobody wants in their neighborhood. 

 

From a neighborhood and human standpoint, it had to come down. The section of Wade Park where the building sat has yet to see much reinvestment come in.

 

Edited by Oldmanladyluck
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Just now, KFM44107 said:

I'm aware. What I'm telling you is do you know how hard it is to bring a slum landlord, particularly an out of state slum landlord to bring their property into good condition? Housing violations are criminal violations, and therefore service needs to be perfected. Best of luck with an out of state Israeli investor with a fake in state  property manager.  It's easier to nuisance abatement demo the properties and throw the cost of demo on the tax duplicate and then let them foreclose on it. 

Then, if not already done, laws should be placed on the books to seize.

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Just now, Frmr CLEder said:

Then, if not already done, laws should be placed on the books to seize.

There are. You can do a civil action and take receivership as the city. But unless the property is still in pretty good shape it doesn't make sense financially when the end game is gonna be foreclosure either way. You're gonna most likely be out the money you put into it as the city. Its typically cheaper to demo (especially when the money was coming from the county) and frankly the legal process takes just as long. 

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Then it needs to be fixed. There are too many neglected or abandoned properties that as stated above, attract negative elements and/or adversely affect the neighboring properties, driving down property values and attracting crime.

It becomes an insidious blight that metastasizes like a cancer.

Edited by Frmr CLEder

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38 minutes ago, Oldmanladyluck said:

 

From a neighborhood and human standpoint, it had to come down. 

 

 

Now that I know where you work, I believe you. 

 

The but the question remains, there are many historic, solidly built, and potentially beautiful apartment buildings in Hough and the rest of the inner city that could be saved. How do we protect them so that they can be saved?

 

The alternative is losing a sense of place by creating cheap, modern housing that looks like any other place and doesn't last. So in 30-40 years we'll again have run-down buildings that aren't worth maintaining and there will be landlords who won't maintain them. The cheap crap that we built in the last 40-50 years ago, going back to the likes of MLK Plaza (who owns that, BTW?), falls apart after 25 years and gets condemned. Perhaps Hough will just be locked into a century of substandard housing because we failed to maintain the housing stock that was designed and built to last?

Edited by KJP
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4 minutes ago, KJP said:

 

Now that I know where you work, I believe you. 

 

The but the question remains, there are many historic, solidly built, and potentially beautiful apartment buildings in Hough and the rest of the inner city that could be saved. How do we protect them so that they can be saved?

 

The alternative is losing a sense of place by creating cheap, modern housing that looks like any other place and doesn't last. So in 30-40 years we'll again have run-down buildings that aren't worth maintaining and there will be landlords who won't maintain them. The cheap crap that we built in the last 40-50 years ago, going back to the likes of MLK Plaza (who owns that, BTW?), falls apart after 25 years and gets condemned. Perhaps Hough will just be locked into a century of substandard housing because we failed to maintain the housing stock that was designed and built to last?

While expensive, isn't there an opportunity to relocate some of these to other areas of the city? NYC relocated a theater in the Times Square area  back in the 90s, with the help of Disney.

Edited by Frmr CLEder

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20 minutes ago, Frmr CLEder said:

While expensive, isn't there an opportunity to relocate some of these to other areas of the city? NYC relocated a theater in the Times Square area  back in the 90s, with the help of Disney.

 

Would that be high-rent New York City and deep-pocketed Disney?

 

By contrast....

 

Would that be low-rent Cleveland, lower-rent Hough and the only deep pockets nearby are those of the Cleveland Clinic who couldn't care less about historic preservation.

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3 hours ago, KJP said:

 

Now that I know where you work, I believe you. 

 

The but the question remains, there are many historic, solidly built, and potentially beautiful apartment buildings in Hough and the rest of the inner city that could be saved. How do we protect them so that they can be saved?

 

The alternative is losing a sense of place by creating cheap, modern housing that looks like any other place and doesn't last. So in 30-40 years we'll again have run-down buildings that aren't worth maintaining and there will be landlords who won't maintain them. The cheap crap that we built in the last 40-50 years ago, going back to the likes of MLK Plaza (who owns that, BTW?), falls apart after 25 years and gets condemned. Perhaps Hough will just be locked into a century of substandard housing because we failed to maintain the housing stock that was designed and built to last?

I think as more new build is built then there will be more of a private sector appetite to rehab these old buildings as the rents begin to come in line with rehab. I'm with you, I hope we are able to preserve alot of these solidly built apartments. I personally think alot of these east side single family stock over there isn't worth preserving (with exception of course). Id like to see more multifamily and dense townhome construction on old single family land. 

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5 hours ago, Oldmanladyluck said:

Boarded or not- if a building is vacant and a person really wants to get in, they'll get in. I've seen it happen too many times to count. However there are ways to board a building which makes it harder to enter than just nailing up plywood.

 

This is what I'm talking about.  But instead of the City taking ownership, it probably needs some sort of legal mechanism to perform an emergency abatement of unsafe building conditions, and then charge that to the landowner.  Most likely that just goes onto the unpaid taxbill, but when the City forecloses, it will still have a building in decent shape and not just a wreck that needs demolished.

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^Yep- thats the way things should go. The problem is that the Cuyahoga County Land Bank does not accept buildings the size of the former Alhambra; they limit the size of the buildings to two or three suiters due to the cost of upkeep and potential demo. The cost for demo of a typical house in Cleveland is about $10,000. Except for a pass-through to another beneficial owner with the financial wherewithal to fix the building, the County would never accept it. The City Land Bank on the other hand only takes vacant lots.

 

Thats where state forfeiture kicks in, which creates its own nightmares for folks living around vacant structures. Oftentimes the structure is picked up by someone with no idea what they're getting themselves into, thinking they can fix a multi-suite building for cheap. A building like the Alhambra could easily cost over a million just to bring back up to code. 

Edited by Oldmanladyluck
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Apparently the Kenmore Apartments are under more than just renovation, but expansion too, including a new community center....

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2020/crr01-13-2020.pdf

 

Board of Zoning Appeals

JANUARY 13, 2019

 

9:30 Calendar No. 19-298:

8901 Wade Park

Ward 7 Basheer S. Jones 9 Notices

 

Kenmore Gardens Ltd., owner, proposes to expand the use of an apartment to include a community center on a parcel located in Two-Family Residential and Local Retail Business District. The owner appeals for relief from the strict application of the following sections of the Cleveland Codified Ordinances: 1. Section 337.03 which states that by reference per 337.02 (g)(3) Community Center is permitted if located 30' from any adjoining premises in residence district not used for a similar purpose, and subject to BZA approval. 2. Sections 352.08 through 352.11 which state that a 6 foot wide transition strip is required at the rear and sides where the use abuts Two-Family District. 3. Section 349.04(e) which states that 28 parking spaces at the rate of one per 150 square feet plus one per each employee is required; 9 spaces are shown (Filed November 19, 2019)

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Just some pics from this morning of the Axis at Ansel development:

IMG_20200219_100418121.thumb.jpg.f6115501c60bb34598069e409f15f937.jpgIMG_20200219_100540385.thumb.jpg.2a8f90c599f304793c93beca68cdc2f8.jpgIMG_20200219_100657867_HDR.thumb.jpg.5e1d62482a1112221ffba5c500fcd565.jpg

Walking around the area it's also interesting to see all of the gorgeous old apartment buildings. A lot of them are vacant which gives me hope that Axis will spur the renovation of some of these properties.

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1552+Ansel+Road.JPG

 

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2020

Seeds & Sprouts V - Early intel on real estate projects

 

Two Hough apartment blocks may be saved

Facing a condemnation order from the City of Cleveland, affordable housing developer and property manager Vesta Corp. of Connecticut is appealing and requesting 180 days to abate building code violations at two 96-year-old, vacant apartment buildings it owns -- 1552 and 1568 Ansel Road. The city's Board of Building Standards is scheduled to consider Vesta's request at its April 15 meeting.

 

MORE:

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2020/03/seeds-sprouts-v-early-intel-on-real.html

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Just posting this here as well. This is right on the border (Chester Ave) where Hough and Midtown intersect, so I wasn't sure where this would better fit.

1 minute ago, tykaps said:

Permits were submitted yesterday for a new apartment building at the Northwest corner of Chester and E 75th, creatively named "Chester75". As per the description of the permit:
"The proposed development will be constructed at Chester Ave and East 75th St on a .84 acre site, which was most recently a place of worship. Chester75 will introduce 56 new market-rate apartments in a configuration of studio, 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, and 2 story townhome style units. The 4-story, 56,000 SF building will provide amenities in ground floor common areas and a fourth floor community room and roof deck. Additionally, the site development will include 50 off-street parking spaces."

City Architecture is listed as the architects. Famicos is the current owner of the property to be built upon.

image.png.710a40e9095f995b5cbfea58ae861829.pngCapture2.thumb.PNG.e2f2781a1bf90e63ecd48a730d26b4ff.PNGCapture3.thumb.PNG.621b143bf5fe1da405e23cc15de1a16e.PNG

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Glad to see they're moving forward on this. It's the first phase of a much larger development. I'll have more to share about this.

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Apartments Proposed for 75th and Chester Avenue. Townhouse on the other three corners

Ron Calhoun

Link: https://ward7observer.com/apartments-proposed-for-75th-and-chester-avenue-townhouse-on-the-other-three-corners/

 

"John Anoliefo, the executive director of Famicos, stated that his organization already owns the building on the northwest corner, which previously was a Jehovah’s Witness Church, and was in the process of acquiring the other land for the project. Director of Real Estate Development for Famicos, Khrys Shefton stated, 'Famicos mission is to revitalize greater Cleveland though affordable housing and neighborhood revitalization and there is no CDClike us.'"

 

j6H3SF.jpg

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Awwwww......daaaammmnn!  Did someone just beat KJP to the punch?!

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2 hours ago, X said:

Awwwww......daaaammmnn!  Did someone just beat KJP to the punch?!

 

Well.... I briefly mentioned Chester75 in the third part, here from last November:

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2019/11/seeds-sprouts-iv-early-intel-on-real.html

 

😎  😎  😎 

 

 


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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I hope this makes up for it.......

 

75+Chester-CROP.jpg

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2020

Chester75 sounds University Circle's boom in Hough

 

A significant, multi-phase residential development is proposed on the border of the Hough and Fairfax neighborhoods, in the vicinity of Chester Avenue and East 75th Street. It and other developments represent a continued spillover effect from booming employers and residential investments in neighboring University Circle.

The Famicos Foundation, a nonprofit community development corporation, submitted building permit applications to the city this week for the first phase of Chester75, to rise on the northwest corner of Chester and East 75th. The site at 1914 E. 75th St. previously was home to the Cedar Congregation of Jehovah Witnesses.

In its place, Famicos is proposing a four-story, 56,700-square-foot market-rate apartment building. According to its permit application, the building will offer a mix of studio, one-bedroom, two-bedroom and two-story townhome-style units.

 

MORE:

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2020/04/chester75-sounds-university-circles.html

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4 hours ago, Larry1962 said:

^^ That's 56 units ...

Correct?

 

Apparently 


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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The thing that surprises me a little with this overall development plan is that they're doing the apartments north of Chester and the townhouses south of it.  I always assumed we would see the density gradient of newer developments go the other way.

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1 hour ago, X said:

The thing that surprises me a little with this overall development plan is that they're doing the apartments north of Chester and the townhouses south of it.  I always assumed we would see the density gradient of newer developments go the other way.

 

Absolutely. That point was made by someone at the public meeting last fall. The question wasn't addressed.

 

1 hour ago, freefourur said:

Is there any idea as to the price point for the upcoming townhomes? 

 

Not yet. Hopefully they're not as high as the Vazza townhomes on Euclid.

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Famicos addresses why Chester75 isn't being proposed to the south side of Chester.....

 

Chester-East+75th+June2019.jpg

 

TUESDAY, MAY 5, 2020

Chester75 concept OK'd by city design-review

 

Conceptual designs for a new 57-unit, market-rate apartment development in the Hough neighborhood were approved by the City of Cleveland's Euclid Corridor Design Review Committee. It was the first design-review meeting held since the start of the coronavirus crisis two months ago.

This and the restart of City Planning Commission meetings, albeit virtually, are helping to ease the most significant pandemic-related barrier to new construction in Cleveland. Developers and their financiers, who are still able to access capital, say they continue to see strong interest in new housing to address a shortage of quality residential units in Cleveland.

 

MORE:

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2020/05/chester75-concept-okd-by-city-design.html

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That doesn't look like an apartment building.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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45 minutes ago, gruver said:

It has a fire escape!

 

Probably one of those fine Hough homes in the 1920s that were converted to boarding houses in the 1930s so that homeowners could make ends meet. And were the targets of blockbusting during the 1950s and 60s so that landlords could pack 76,000 uneducated poor people per square mile into Hough and turn it into a powerkeg.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Exactly!

 

The area was full of these and very densely populated.  It's so sad to see the vacant lots that are now in that area.

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20 hours ago, KJP said:

 

Probably one of those fine Hough homes in the 1920s that were converted to boarding houses in the 1930s so that homeowners could make ends meet. And were the targets of blockbusting during the 1950s and 60s so that landlords could pack 76,000 uneducated poor people per square mile into Hough and turn it into a powerkeg.

76k per square mile????

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24 minutes ago, freefourur said:

76k per square mile????

 

Yes, I recall reading that was the estimated population density of Hough in the mid-1960s right before the riots. I also remember seeing a heat map showing citywide population change from 1950 to 1960. Almost census tract in the city had lost population except those in West Park, Old Brooklyn and Hough. And Hough's population increase was extraordinarily high.

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