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Columbus: Italian Village: Jeffrey Park Development

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They built a retail focused building where it made sense, on North 4th. That's the street that should be developed as a commercial mixed use corridor. There's plenty of vacancy (including at Kramer Place across the street) and under-utilized space there. No one in Jeffery Park is more than 1,200 ft from North 4th. 

 

I don't understand how people expect to force a coffee shop or artisanal bakery every 30 feet. No one eats that much bread! 

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11 hours ago, 17thState said:

Wagenbrenner didn't build the $1M exposed plywood building, that was the one Jeffery park lot they didn't own. Those were built by Mulberry. 

 

I think Wagenbrenner has overall done a nice job turning a huge empty lot into a neighborhood. The northern street wall is a little bit monotonous and the placement of the town homes is a bit odd in some places. But I've been in some them and they seem nicely done inside and out. 

Yep. Mulberry is also building that cheap, hideous condo building at Ohio and Bryden in OTE.

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1 hour ago, 17thState said:

They built a retail focused building where it made sense, on North 4th. That's the street that should be developed as a commercial mixed use corridor. There's plenty of vacancy (including at Kramer Place across the street) and under-utilized space there. No one in Jeffery Park is more than 1,200 ft from North 4th. 

 

I don't understand how people expect to force a coffee shop or artisanal bakery every 30 feet. No one eats that much bread! 

Yeah, the density here is great. With so much retail nearby and on its way I don't see the need for this to be filled with mixed-use. More green space would be nice though. A Goodale Park for Italian Village should have been built here, and the residential buildings oriented to it.

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5 hours ago, 4N6science said:

I think for this amount of people moving into one area without more mixed use is kind of a shame. 

It's helping 4th develop though, there has been a complete transformation of that corridor in the past 12-16 months.  I am disappointed that they didn't make it more mixed used though.

 

Also shame on Mulberry and my apologies to Wagenbrenner for my previous comments.

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On 2/9/2019 at 1:38 PM, wpcc88 said:

It's helping 4th develop though, there has been a complete transformation of that corridor in the past 12-16 months.  I am disappointed that they didn't make it more mixed used though.

 

Also shame on Mulberry and my apologies to Wagenbrenner for my previous comments.

 

Yes, overall it is helping 4th grow and that is great. I remember seeing the field of dirt and concrete when I moved here in 2014. Obviously having this density of people is much better. I will hope that more businesses will start moving in to help fill the needs of all the new residents. 

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At what point will density be high enough for retail to move in? There are empty storefronts on High St in the new buildings between 7th and 9th too. Is the rent so high that it's cost prohibitive for local businesses? Can only national chains afford the rent? 

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7 hours ago, Pablo said:

At what point will density be high enough for retail to move in? There are empty storefronts on High St in the new buildings between 7th and 9th too. Is the rent so high that it's cost prohibitive for local businesses? Can only national chains afford the rent? 

Rent is high because it's a hot neighborhood... greed is the only answer.. if I'm a developer I'm aiming for 100% occupancy before the build is complete, give discounts at first and get tenants and raise it when the contract is up.. some think like that in Columbus and others don't

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13 hours ago, Pablo said:

At what point will density be high enough for retail to move in? There are empty storefronts on High St in the new buildings between 7th and 9th too. Is the rent so high that it's cost prohibitive for local businesses? Can only national chains afford the rent? 

 

Population density across the Short North overall hit 10,400 in 2017, the latest year we have.  That's up by about 1200 since 2010, and is probably being undercounted given that the Census has consistently shown only relatively low growth for that area for some reason. 

The retail issue outside of High is still related to High.  The entire Short North is expensive for retail because of the destination that is High, as well as the quality neighborhoods around it.  On corridors like 4th, you still have higher rents, but significantly less guaranteed traffic than High Street, where so much retail is already concentrated.  Beyond that, few new projects off of High actually include retail space, so you're not even seeing potential retail down the road.

As for the future of retail away from High, other corridors are best served with local concentrations, like at major intersections.  Sort of like those in German Village- not destination retail, but neighborhood-level stuff.

Edited by jonoh81
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On 2/11/2019 at 10:10 PM, jonoh81 said:

 

Population density across the Short North overall hit 10,400 in 2017, the latest year we have.  That's up by about 1200 since 2010, and is probably being undercounted given that the Census has consistently shown only relatively low growth for that area for some reason. 

The retail issue outside of High is still related to High.  The entire Short North is expensive for retail because of the destination that is High, as well as the quality neighborhoods around it.  On corridors like 4th, you still have higher rents, but significantly less guaranteed traffic than High Street, where so much retail is already concentrated.  Beyond that, few new projects off of High actually include retail space, so you're not even seeing potential retail down the road.

As for the future of retail away from High, other corridors are best served with local concentrations, like at major intersections.  Sort of like those in German Village- not destination retail, but neighborhood-level stuff.

 

I think some of that has to do with the existing building stock. What you said holds very true for a place like Victorian Village. Large, historic single-family homes are hard to convert to a functional retail space, and very cost prohibitive. But a place like Italian Village is slowly becoming the "just off High" commercial area. All of those small former factories are great for converting into coffee shops, breweries, and so on. And most of the buildings are fronted up against a street with no or minimal setback. The challenge for this area is going to be 4th and Summit, which are basically highways. There's a noticeable drop in pedestrian comfort level once you get off High Street and into the Italian Village area. 

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