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Dblcut3

Dblcut3's Random Youngstown Photo Tours

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Hey everyone! I decided to make a thread to post all of my photos I take around Youngstown. The first update to this post is a walk around Wick Park Historic District and parts of Downtown. Make sure to check back at this post in the future for more photos that I will add in the future when I take more! And if you have suggestions for places in town to photograph, let me know!

 

Wick Park January 2nd:

 

I started out on Elm Street - Elm Street is an up and coming neighborhood business district. It has a co-op restaurant (Cultivate Cafe), a few shops, art/music venues, and most recently a coffeehouse. The street connects to some of YSU's dorms, so businesses on the street are mainly supported by YSU students living in the dorms and in rental houses in Wick Park.

 

This is Culturehouse Coffeehouse on Elm Street:

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A mural on the side of a building on Elm Street:

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Next, I walked down Madison Avenue because I saw this really cool run down house. It is very overgrown and appears to be a slumlord property. But it is really a beautiful old house - as you will see, most of the remaining historic homes in this neighborhood are very run down and are now student slums:

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Next, these apartment buildings from the early 1900s (on the corner of Park Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue) are some of the only well preserved apartment buildings from that era remaining. The neighborhood was once full of buildings like this, but most are either very run down or gone all together. But these buildings are still beautiful and a glimpse into what the neighborhood once was:

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Here are some of the other houses on Park Avenue:

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Here's some houses on Broadway (The north side of the park) - this side is visibly more run down and a lot of buildings are in really bad shape - unfortunately I forgot to take photos of a lot of cool houses here. Also, I didn't venture onto any side streets to see the other historic mansions in the area because I'm not familiar enough with those streets and the area is a bit sketchy depending on the block:

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I then made a quick stop at the Welsh Congregational Church near YSU - it is Youngstown's oldest church. A group wanted to relocate it to Wick Park to save it, but the city is very opposed to any preservation efforts. It will likely be knocked down soon:

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Downtown January 2nd:

Next I went to Downtown - unfortunately my camera died fairly quickly so I did not get to take anywhere near as much photos as I hoped for - expect me to post more in the future when I take them!

 

West Federal Street is a pretty lively part of Downtown and is usually busy. However, the farthest block of it from Central Square is still not revitalized. These four buildings are largely vacant but I hope they will become something soon - they right by the DeYor Center and the Tech Block (Youngstown Business Incubator) so I feel like there is enough demand for some new business there. Sadly the other side of the road is almost all parking lots so it's not too welcoming of a block:

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Next, this photo is looking west on West Federal Street. This is the Tech Block - all of the buildings on the left except for the Home Savings Building are owned by the Tech Incubator - they have also expanded to buildings such as the old Vindicator Building on the other sides on this block. Some businesses have come as a result such as Joe Maxx Coffee which relocated from Central Square to here this year:

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The top of the Home Savings Building is arguably the most iconic building in Youngstown:

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The other side of this block (left) is dominated by 1990s "urban renewal" - though these brought a lot of jobs to the block, they lack first floor retail and the building sure have not aged well...

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These are three historic buildings on the "Tech Block" of West Federal - however the building on the left (State Theater) is actually just a facade - the rest of the building is gone. Currently a developer is toying with the idea of developing the lot next to it and the lot with the state theater to utilize the old facade. Another fun fact; it was the first venue outside of NYC where the Ramones played in. The middle building, the Davis Building, was built in 1899 and was restored very nicely in the 2000's making it one of the first revitalized buildings Downtown. The storefront is empty however but is occasionally occupied by pop up stores or used as event space. The building on the right houses a long time dive bar as well as a new and unique barbecue kitchen, Space Kat:

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One of the cool things Downtown has done in the past two years is decorating their utility boxes. Almost every utility box in Downtown and YSU has been redesigned by local artists. It really adds some nice art and color to the city. This is the corner of Hazel and West Federal:

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The next photo is looking down West Federal from the Hazel St. intersection. The empty lot of the left was the Paramount Theater which was unfortunately torn down 5 years ago or so.The two buildings adjacent to it need some TLC, but other than those, this block is very lively and has seen a lot of development in recent years. It is sort of the hub of the entertainment district Downtown and is pretty crowded on weekends:

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The next photo is looking down Hazel Street towards West Federal. On the left is the Gallagher Building. There have been multiple developers promising to develop it but nothing has come of it - mainly due to both developers getting caught up in some legal trouble over mismanagement of money. This is a common theme with Downtown redevelopment. In the process however, Cedar's Lounge, a once popular Downtown attraction, was kicked out due to the first developer's plans. I predict the building will be torn down:

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More views of the Gallagher Building:

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This is the Wells Building on the corner of Hazel and West Federal. It was beautifully renovated two years ago into luxury apartments (which have quite high rent might I add) with office space on the first floor by Strollo Architects. You can also see the empty lot I said Strollo was trying to redevelop in between the State Theater facade and Wells Building. The steam that comes out of the manholes on this corner for some reason make for great photo ops!

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This is the only photo I got in Central Square before my camera died. You can see Realty Tower which was one of the first apartment building renovations in Downtown by NYO Property Group. The first floor recently became home to a smoothie bar and a recently expanded spa/barber shop. On the left in the foreground is the Stambaugh Building, home to the new DoubleTree by Hilton developed by NYO. It also is home to Bistro 1907. It was supposed to be home to a Tuscany restaurant YOSTERIA and a new location for Boardman based Branch Street Roasters, but NYO ran into some money problems causing those projects to fall through for the time being:

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Lastly, here's a photo of the neon sign on the Federal Building on the corner of Phelps and West Federal with the Wick Tower apartments behind it:

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These are only some of the photos I took that day - if you want, you can see the rest on my VSCO page.

 

 

Scroll down for more Youngstown area photos!

Edited by Dblcut3
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Great tour.  Thanks for this!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Thanks for the tour. There is some great architecture in Youngstown. It's sad seeing so much of the historic stock sitting vacant and in bad condition. I suppose this isn't unique to Youngstown, but it seems like the prospects for revitalization are considerably dimmer there than in other parts of the state. Has there been any real dent made in the economic depression of the Mahoning Valley? I know GM just announced a major closure there. Seems like the region just can't catch a break.

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On 1/15/2019 at 2:49 PM, edale said:

Thanks for the tour. There is some great architecture in Youngstown. It's sad seeing so much of the historic stock sitting vacant and in bad condition. I suppose this isn't unique to Youngstown, but it seems like the prospects for revitalization are considerably dimmer there than in other parts of the state. Has there been any real dent made in the economic depression of the Mahoning Valley? I know GM just announced a major closure there. Seems like the region just can't catch a break.

I think I made Downtown look more bleak than it is because I didn't get the chance to photograph the most busy areas. Downtown itself is very much on an upswing and is usually quite busy depending on the block. The bars also make it a big entertainment destination, especially during the warmer months. For all intents and purposes, Downtown is revitalized, it just needs some love on the outer sections for the most part. The other neighborhoods in Youngstown on the other hand are not doing great - however they look much better than 5 years ago due to the YNDC which has renovated countless houses across the city and works to clean up and beautify neighborhoods.

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Wick Park Feb. 4, 2019:

 

I stopped by Wick Park today and took a few photos of some buildings since it was warmer out today. All of these pictures are from the area around the corner of Elm Street and Broadway.

 

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This Queen Anne style home on the corner of Elm & Broadway is one of the best preserved houses in the neighborhood. It was renovated in recent years and remains a single family house unlike most of the other houses in the neighborhood which have been subdivided:

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This is one of my favorite buildings in Youngstown. It is an abandoned apartment building from the 1910s. I didn't have much time today, but I plan to go back and take more photos of this building soon - especially since I suspect it will unfortunately be torn down soon. It's probably beyond saving:

 

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Such potential!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Wick Park Feb. 21, 2019:

More Wick Park photos once again! I promise I'll eventually branch out into other neighborhoods 😁 Hopefully in the coming months I'll have some photos from Crandall Park, Indian Village, and Newport Village/Forest Glen in Boardman.

 

This is an abandoned apartment building (maybe a school?) built in the 1910s on the corner of Bryson Street and Woodbine Avenue. Sadly it will probably get torn down soon enough as it's in very bad shape:
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Here's two houses across the street from the building on Woodbine Avenue. Besides the apartment building, almost every other house around this corner is kept up well. The first house in particular was very overgrown and in bad shape only a few years ago as seen in this street view:

 

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Lastly, here's a house on Park Avenue directly across from Wick Park:

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Also, just a reminder, if you want to see the rest of the photos I take of buildings in various cities, you can follow my Instagram page @BuildingsOfAmerica.

 

Edited by Dblcut3
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Doesn't look like that apartment building is in bad shape. Lots of straight lines in the brick and edges. I've seen much worse buildings than that get renovated -- if there is a demand....


"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities."-Voltaire

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8 hours ago, KJP said:

Doesn't look like that apartment building is in bad shape. Lots of straight lines in the brick and edges. I've seen much worse buildings than that get renovated -- if there is a demand....

Sadly there's not much of a demand for anything in Youngstown these days 😁 It's a shame seeing these apartments go - the houses in the area are starting to be cared for more, but it's such a shame to lose all the denser residential buildings. It's a shame the neighborhood doesn't benefit more from YSU.

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I don't have a full "photo tour" today but I got a couple random photos in the past two weeks. 

 

Newport Village Historic District:

Newport Village and Forest Glen Estates make up the Boardman Historic District, Youngstown's first "streetcar suburb". They are located just across the street from Youngstown's South Side. Today the neighborhoods are beautifully maintained and filled with 1900s-1930s era mansions and middle class houses centered around tree lined boulevards. There are especially a lot of beautiful tudor homes. They stand heavily in contrast to the surrounding South Side neighborhoods which are in distress or barely hanging on.

 

Here's an example of one of the many beautiful tudor homes. This one is on Jennette Drive which is full of beautifully preserved tudor houses. Only two blocks away across Midlothian is one of the worst parts of the South Side, yet this area remains one of Boardman's most desirable neighborhoods:

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Another house on Jennette Drive:

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I'll 100% be back to take photos of more houses and commercial buildings in Newport Village once the weather gets nicer!

 

Leetonia, Ohio:

I made a quick stop in Leetonia the other day. Leetonia is a small village south of Youngstown. I only took a few photos of the Downtown area which appears rather rundown and desolate. However, there are several streets just north of Main Street with absolutely stunning Victorian era mansions. Again, I will definitely be back to take photos of those! But in the meantime, here's the quite gritty and abandoned Main Street on a snowy day:

 

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Thank you for this.  Keep these coming!

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"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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I was driving around the North Side and came across this really beautiful house... it's such a shame that it's in this state. I knew it would probably be torn down soon, so I had to stop and get a picture of it. There's a lot of other houses like this (many in better condition) in this neighborhood, but frankly it's a sketchy part of town so I'm not sure I want to walk around taking photos...The house is on the corner of Juanita and Alameda:

 

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And also, here's some photos from High Street in Leetonia, Ohio. High Street was Leetonia's millionaire row and still has a lot of old 1800s Victorian mansions. Here's a few of the houses on the street:

 

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Crandall Park North & Parkway Towers:
I took a quick walk to take photos at Parkway Towers, an abandoned apartment building in front of Stambaugh Auditorium and Wick Park. After, I walked along a block of Tod Lane in the Crandall Park North neighborhood to get some photos of the old mansions there.

 

Stambaugh Auditorium:
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Parkway Towers:

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Tod Lane in Crandall Park North Historic District:

Crandall Park North was one of Youngstown's early wealthy neighborhoods. It was developed in the early 1900s as an alternative to the Wick Park area. Today the area north of the park (Crandall Park North and North Heights) remain generally stable. Some parts are good neighborhoods, others are making comebacks, and some are still seemingly doomed. South of the park is the older part of the North Side (Crandall Park South and Wick Park). These neighborhoods are in much worse shape and most old mansions are not kept up. This block of Tod Lane that I photographed is surprisingly kept up - I plan to take more photos here and in Crandall Park South.

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A newer house from either the 40s or 50s:

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This house was once owned by the Wick family, a prominent Youngstown family. It fell into despair in recent decades but was luckily saved by a neighborhood preservationist last year after a lengthy campaign to sell it rather than tear it down. It's good to see it be saved since it was the last house on the block that was in bad shape:

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The Burt Printz Mansion, built in 1915 with an addition built in later decades. It is now being used as a bed and breakfast. It is on the corner of Tod Lane and Fifth Avenue:

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Edited by Dblcut3
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I just can't seem to get back in the habit of visiting this site more often.  So, I just saw this thread.

 

A few notes on some of the Wick Park photos, since it's my neighborhood:

- The house on Madison is owned (and occupied) by the former owners of Dorian Books.  I don't know much about them, or their house.  There's some gossip about their building, but I don't want to share that here, because I don't even know the whole story.

- The apartments on Park and Pennsylvania Ave. are very nice.  The owner is hesitant to develop the front buildings, for some reason.  So, they remain empty.  But, at least he maintains them.

- The red queen anne and stone house on Park are owned by the same guy who owns the Renner Mansion.  His level of care is a little lower than I'd like to see.

- The house on Broadway with the buff brick and green cornice is owner occupied.  I don't know them, but apparently, they don't have the finances to undertake an exterior restoration.  This is a recurring theme in the neighborhood; these large old houses are expensive to repair and maintain, once they've been neglected.

- The red brick house on Broadway was Charles H. Owsley's home.  It was recently bought and renovated.  It is owner occupied, but is still set up as apartments.  I think the owners' daughter lives in one of the other apartments.

- The stone house on Broadway was hastily/cheaply renovated for a fraternity.   It was vacant for years and years, and was tied up in court, because the owner died, and the house--along with the other houses he owned--had massive amounts of debt and back taxes tied to them.  But, a hasty renovation is better than demolition.  Unfortunately, his other houses weren't so lucky.

- The green and yellow brick house near the corner of Elm and Broadway is currently for sale.  The owner put a lot of infrastructure work into the house, including converting it back to a single residence, but never got around to the cosmetics.  So, it's still a project.  For those interested in buying a house in the neighborhood, talking with him is a good place to start.  He knows a lot more than I do about the status of many of the houses in the area.

- The other queen anne house at the corner of Elm and Broadway, is owned by an older lady.  She also doesn't have the resources to keep it maintained, and is in the process of cleaning the place out, and getting ready to sell.  It looks like she is a hoarder, because she owned a vintage clothing/etc. store, and still has a lot of stock left.  I don't think she really wants to move, so this process has been really slow.

- The "best preserved" queen anne house is owner occupied.  The owner--Rob--owns a few other houses in the neighborhood, including the green and brick house discussed above.

- You like that brick apartment building on Broadway?  There is an interesting story with that building.  The building was going to be demolished, a couple years ago.  But, when the contractor walked through the building, he felt so strongly that it was too good to tear down, he worked out a verbal agreement to buy the building from the city.  He was so sure of the deal that he installed a new roof, and cleaned out the interior.  But, the administration changed, and the new city admin. reneged on the contract.  After some fighting, the contractor walked away.  So, I'm not really sure if the city will find another buyer, or if it will be demolished.

- The apartment building at the corner of Bryson and Woodbine (and yes, it was always an apartment building) is in litigation.  But, demolition is imminent, as soon as it gets out of the courts. (assuming the funding source is still there)

- I don't know much about the houses across the street from the apartment building.  But I believe they are owner occupied.  The brown brick house only looks different from the street view, because it's winter in your photos, and the ivy isn't leafed out.

- The yellow and green house on Park Ave. is multifamily.  The owner hired Rob--mentioned above--to do some work, recently, including rebuilding the front porch.  An interesting historical tidbit about this house.  It was originally built for "Bonesetter Reese".  Look him up, and you'll see that there were some very famous visitors to that house, in the early 20th century.

- Finally, Parkway Towers is not strictly abandoned.  The owners are based in NYC, and use the building as a perch for cell phone towers.  They are only interested in collecting the rent from the cell phone companies.  Several years ago, the city tried fining them for their neglect.  But, when it finally went in front of a judge, the judge decided that the build-up of fines was excessive, and dismissed them.  Now, as I understand it, the only tool the city has left, is spot blight eminent domain.  And, the city doesn't want to use that, unless they are absolutely, completely sure there is a buyer lined up to buy the building from the city.  They city can't take responsibility for the building for any length of time.

 

Sorry for the long post.  I didn't comment on all of your photos, though it might seem like it.

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On 7/4/2019 at 1:37 AM, JRC said:

I just can't seem to get back in the habit of visiting this site more often.  So, I just saw this thread.

 

A few notes on some of the Wick Park photos, since it's my neighborhood:

- The house on Madison is owned (and occupied) by the former owners of Dorian Books.  I don't know much about them, or their house.  There's some gossip about their building, but I don't want to share that here, because I don't even know the whole story.

- The apartments on Park and Pennsylvania Ave. are very nice.  The owner is hesitant to develop the front buildings, for some reason.  So, they remain empty.  But, at least he maintains them.

- The red queen anne and stone house on Park are owned by the same guy who owns the Renner Mansion.  His level of care is a little lower than I'd like to see.

- The house on Broadway with the buff brick and green cornice is owner occupied.  I don't know them, but apparently, they don't have the finances to undertake an exterior restoration.  This is a recurring theme in the neighborhood; these large old houses are expensive to repair and maintain, once they've been neglected.

- The red brick house on Broadway was Charles H. Owsley's home.  It was recently bought and renovated.  It is owner occupied, but is still set up as apartments.  I think the owners' daughter lives in one of the other apartments.

- The stone house on Broadway was hastily/cheaply renovated for a fraternity.   It was vacant for years and years, and was tied up in court, because the owner died, and the house--along with the other houses he owned--had massive amounts of debt and back taxes tied to them.  But, a hasty renovation is better than demolition.  Unfortunately, his other houses weren't so lucky.

- The green and yellow brick house near the corner of Elm and Broadway is currently for sale.  The owner put a lot of infrastructure work into the house, including converting it back to a single residence, but never got around to the cosmetics.  So, it's still a project.  For those interested in buying a house in the neighborhood, talking with him is a good place to start.  He knows a lot more than I do about the status of many of the houses in the area.

- The other queen anne house at the corner of Elm and Broadway, is owned by an older lady.  She also doesn't have the resources to keep it maintained, and is in the process of cleaning the place out, and getting ready to sell.  It looks like she is a hoarder, because she owned a vintage clothing/etc. store, and still has a lot of stock left.  I don't think she really wants to move, so this process has been really slow.

- The "best preserved" queen anne house is owner occupied.  The owner--Rob--owns a few other houses in the neighborhood, including the green and brick house discussed above.

- You like that brick apartment building on Broadway?  There is an interesting story with that building.  The building was going to be demolished, a couple years ago.  But, when the contractor walked through the building, he felt so strongly that it was too good to tear down, he worked out a verbal agreement to buy the building from the city.  He was so sure of the deal that he installed a new roof, and cleaned out the interior.  But, the administration changed, and the new city admin. reneged on the contract.  After some fighting, the contractor walked away.  So, I'm not really sure if the city will find another buyer, or if it will be demolished.

- The apartment building at the corner of Bryson and Woodbine (and yes, it was always an apartment building) is in litigation.  But, demolition is imminent, as soon as it gets out of the courts. (assuming the funding source is still there)

- I don't know much about the houses across the street from the apartment building.  But I believe they are owner occupied.  The brown brick house only looks different from the street view, because it's winter in your photos, and the ivy isn't leafed out.

- The yellow and green house on Park Ave. is multifamily.  The owner hired Rob--mentioned above--to do some work, recently, including rebuilding the front porch.  An interesting historical tidbit about this house.  It was originally built for "Bonesetter Reese".  Look him up, and you'll see that there were some very famous visitors to that house, in the early 20th century.

- Finally, Parkway Towers is not strictly abandoned.  The owners are based in NYC, and use the building as a perch for cell phone towers.  They are only interested in collecting the rent from the cell phone companies.  Several years ago, the city tried fining them for their neglect.  But, when it finally went in front of a judge, the judge decided that the build-up of fines was excessive, and dismissed them.  Now, as I understand it, the only tool the city has left, is spot blight eminent domain.  And, the city doesn't want to use that, unless they are absolutely, completely sure there is a buyer lined up to buy the building from the city.  They city can't take responsibility for the building for any length of time.

 

Sorry for the long post.  I didn't comment on all of your photos, though it might seem like it.

I can't believe I never saw this reply until now! Thanks for sharing that information! It's a shame to see the state the neighborhood is in but I suppose it's finally starting to take a turn for the better; however I bet we will still see a lot of demolitions unfortunately. However it is good to see the boom of business on Elm Street; it was certainly unexpected to me but having a coffee shop and restaurants in the neighborhood really helps. I think Wick Park has a great future as a neighborhood for YSU students and young adults; I know the whole issue of student rentals is controversial and not ideal in comparison to owner occupied properties, but at least the buildings are being kept alive as rentals. If the city and neighborhood plays its cards right, I could even foresee it becoming a mini version of Akron's Highland Square or something. It's already walkable, close enough to Downtown, next to YSU, has a huge park, and lots of new businesses.

 

I really wish I could restore the apartment buildings on Bryson Street and Broadway! They are absolutely beautiful and I have a soft spot for old apartment buildings like that. And I do know about the Bonesetter Reese house, my high school photography teacher taught me a lot of history about random Youngstown history including the story of that house! 

 

Also, I wrote an article about the current state of Parkway Towers and I may do one about the various houses in the neighborhood.

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Indian Village Historic District May 2019

Indian Village is a tiny historic district in Youngstown's South Side between Glenwood Avenue an Mill Creek Park. The small neighborhood has managed to remain stable and well maintained despite being located adjacent to some of the city's worst areas. Unfortunately I didn't photograph the whole neighborhood, just the houses on Kiawatha Drive along the bike trail in Mill Creek Park. In my opinion it's one of the city's greatest hidden gems.

 

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And here's a bonus pic of a house on Canfield Avenue in the Idora neighborhood:

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It's crazy to me how many more buildings have been torn down in the Wick Park area over the last 15 years or so.  When at YSU in the early 00's Pennsylvania Ave was for the most part still entact, while not necessarily in good shape.  Now it seems to be mostly empty lots.

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1 hour ago, Traveler Joe said:

It's crazy to me how many more buildings have been torn down in the Wick Park area over the last 15 years or so.  When at YSU in the early 00's Pennsylvania Ave was for the most part still entact, while not necessarily in good shape.  Now it seems to be mostly empty lots.

I think I saw from someone in the neighborhood that something like only 3/12 of the original houses on that street remain. The good news is that there's some renovations going on in the neighborhood and there's a solid business district on Elm Street now

Edited by Dblcut3

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Good to hear, though I'm kind of bummed about the bookstores transition.  Wish I would have been more into architecture, preservation and exploring the neighborhood back then. 

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