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jmecklenborg

Nashville Gentrification Madness #3

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16 minutes ago, jam40jeff said:

 

I think even this doesn't give enough credit to Ohioans.  I rag on the tastes of suburbanites as much as anyone here, but they like plenty of things more interesting than Olive Garden, just as I'm sure plenty of people in the suburbs of Chicago/NYC/LA love Olive Garden.  Cleveland has Mitchell's and Melt, Akron has Swenson's, Cincinnati has Graeter's, Columbus has Jeni's and Bibibop (and countless others), etc.  Those aren't culturally unique or anything, but they're just as interesting as LA's obsession with In-N-Out or the east coast's obsession with Shake Shack.

There's a Cheesecake Factory in Beverly Hills, for crying out loud. People are boring literally everywhere, just like every city has interesting pockets if you bother to look for it and not dismiss it as dumb.

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^Agree. And sometimes people also just want to un-ironically enjoy a 1300 calorie piece of cheesecake with a group of their friends and not worry how "on message" their life is, regardless of whether it's in OH or not. 

Edited by GrassIsGreener

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1 minute ago, GrassIsGreener said:

^Agree. And sometimes people also just want to un-ironically enjoy a 1300 calorie piece of cheesecake with a group of their friends and not worry how "on message" their life is, regardless of whether it's in OH or not. 

 

And people do that everywhere.  Otherwise, Cheesecake Factory wouldn't be located everywhere.  The difference, and I think neil's posts are highlighting this, is that for some reason if you do that in Ohio it's because you're culturally backwards.  It's a double standard.

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10 minutes ago, OldBearcat said:

Ironic, since the brewery  being discussed was founded in part to encourage open mike, new bands and has video and audio music creation spaces for use.

 

The fact is that there is a limit to how many decent bands exist in any city.  Every live music venue has to book lousy bands to keep their calendar full. 

 

Speaking of microbreweries and Smash Mouth, Smash Mouth itself is playing Urban Artifact on Valentine's Day:

https://www.cincyticket.com/ordertickets.asp?p=7335

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1 hour ago, jmecklenborg said:

The bottom line is that life in most of the United States is culturally pretty similar -- or at least certain cultural things exist in enough volume so as to exist everywhere -- and so people fetishize those typically insignificant characteristics of an area that are unusual that they like and make a sweeping dismissal of an entire area because there is a somewhat higher amount of some unlikeable characteristic.   

 

 

Columbus has TOO MANY Wendy's!

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I don’t think these Nashville pictures have been that bad, certainly not all of them. They need sidewalks and curb drainage where that is lacking of course. 

 

One thing that strikes me is how much better a house can look if the garage is not placed out front and center. Houses with the garage detached behind the house have a classic look to them no matter what style they are, but that setup seems to have mostly fallen out of favor.

Edited by thebillshark

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14 hours ago, jam40jeff said:

 

And people do that everywhere.  Otherwise, Cheesecake Factory wouldn't be located everywhere.  The difference, and I think neil's posts are highlighting this, is that for some reason if you do that in Ohio it's because you're culturally backwards.  It's a double standard.

Toledo doesn't have a lowly Cheesecake Factory...we're clearly better than the rest of America. 

 

More to the point, I get tired of people in Toledo, and most Midwestern cities (hell, maybe all of the US), bellyaching about "getting a ____" - I had to search to make sure there's not a Cheesecake Factory out in some exurban shopperia (there isn't), but I came across posts wailing "eeeeh, when are we going to get a Cheesecake Factory??? Eeeh, when are we getting a Shake Shack??" For some reason, people think that getting the same thing as everyone else is validation that a place is worth something. One of the great things about Toledo, IMHO, is that it doesn't have a lot of national chains. Maybe the demographics make some chains avoid the city, but the locals fill in better than chains would. The last time I was in downtown Chicago - the Loop - it was full of chains. It looked like a mall. Boring. I havent been to the Loop in at least five years. No reason; I can go to all the same stores in suburban Toledo, and a lot cheaper. 

Edited by westerninterloper

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3 hours ago, westerninterloper said:

Toledo doesn't have a lowly Cheesecake Factory...we're clearly better than the rest of America. 

 

More to the point, I get tired of people in Toledo, and most Midwestern cities (hell, maybe all of the US), bellyaching about "getting a ____" - I had to search to make sure there's not a Cheesecake Factory out in some exurban shopperia (there isn't), but I came across posts wailing "eeeeh, when are we going to get a Cheesecake Factory??? Eeeh, when are we getting a Shake Shack??" For some reason, people think that getting the same thing as everyone else is validation that a place is worth something. One of the great things about Toledo, IMHO, is that it doesn't have a lot of national chains. Maybe the demographics make some chains avoid the city, but the locals fill in better than chains would. The last time I was in downtown Chicago - the Loop - it was full of chains. It looked like a mall. Boring. I havent been to the Loop in at least five years. No reason; I can go to all the same stores in suburban Toledo, and a lot cheaper. 

The loop is boring, good stuff is in the neighborhoods...   too many touirsts don't venture out of it.

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30 minutes ago, neilworms said:

The loop is boring, good stuff is in the neighborhoods...   too many touirsts don't venture out of it.

 

I agree, but I find the white parts of cities like Chicago that are highly segregated by income (and thus race) to be too precious. The northside is nice, but it's filled with restaurants that try too hard. Like they have to have a "story" for every ingredient. "This sandwich is a journey." Ann Arbor is similar to me...people living in a bubble with sticks up their fannies about how great it is. Well, your housing prices are ridiculous and nobody who lives there is really from there. Columbus and Indy are getting there too in their "cool sections" like the Short North and Mass Ave. Nashville is already over the top.

 

Maybe I have similarly ridiculous tastes about what I find to be "cool", but I'd much rather frequent Burmese restaurants in Fort Wayne, or Ram's 24 Hour kitchens in Detroit; In Toledo, Schmucker's greasy spoon on the old western bypass, or Kengo's sushi makes their own soy sauce, or Packo's drive through for Hungarian-American food, or PIzza Cat in the old gas station, or Marco's Pizza in every little neighborhood baking solid pies for the masses, or that amazing from-scratch Pho restaurant on Upton that also serves soul food, or that place in Perrysburg with the amazing central Chinese cuisine that the owner bitches about having to make because its on the special menu and she only has one burner but then loves it when a white dude like me scarfs it down. "You're not supposed to like this!!" Those are places that don't fall over themselves trying to manufacture an ambience or construct some cultural capitalizing narrative, they just make their food and make it well. 

Edited by westerninterloper
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I'd love to get a European take on this whole discussion.  For all the feelings of superiority that someone living on the coasts or in Chicago may have, I wonder if the typical European sees any difference in the level of "culture" between Grove City and Chicago.  

 

(Which is not to pick on Grove City; it seems like a pretty typical suburb when I drive through it.)  

 

 

Edited by jdm00

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9 hours ago, westerninterloper said:

 

I agree, but I find the white parts of cities like Chicago that are highly segregated by income (and thus race) to be too precious. The northside is nice, but it's filled with restaurants that try too hard. Like they have to have a "story" for every ingredient. "This sandwich is a journey." Ann Arbor is similar to me...people living in a bubble with sticks up their fannies about how great it is. Well, your housing prices are ridiculous and nobody who lives there is really from there. Columbus and Indy are getting there too in their "cool sections" like the Short North and Mass Ave. Nashville is already over the top.

 

Maybe I have similarly ridiculous tastes about what I find to be "cool", but I'd much rather frequent Burmese restaurants in Fort Wayne, or Ram's 24 Hour kitchens in Detroit; In Toledo, Schmucker's greasy spoon on the old western bypass, or Kengo's sushi makes their own soy sauce, or Packo's drive through for Hungarian-American food, or PIzza Cat in the old gas station, or Marco's Pizza in every little neighborhood baking solid pies for the masses, or that amazing from-scratch Pho restaurant on Upton that also serves soul food, or that place in Perrysburg with the amazing central Chinese cuisine that the owner bitches about having to make because its on the special menu and she only has one burner but then loves it when a white dude like me scarfs it down. "You're not supposed to like this!!" Those are places that don't fall over themselves trying to manufacture an ambience or construct some cultural capitalizing narrative, they just make their food and make it well. 

 

 

Your still not looking hard enough at Chicago, there are plenty of ethnic areas esp on the far north side and divey/old school food spots of all types sprinkled all over the city.   You'd probably love Bridgeport or Jefferson Park to cite a few neighborhoods that don't fit what you are describing.

Edited by neilworms
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Nashville earns top spot on list of North America's most romantic cities

Kara Apel

Updated 7 hrs ago | Posted on Jan 10, 2019

 

NASHVILLE (WSMV) - Music City has made another top 10 list just in time for Valentine's Day.

Nashville has earned the top spot on DatingAdvice.com's "North America's 10 Most Romantic Cities" guide.

The article reads: "We think Nashville is the most romantic city in North America because there’s so much to do and see here, and yet couples can also be content doing nothing at all except sitting with a drink and enjoying the friendly Southern atmosphere."

 

https://www.wsmv.com/news/nashville-earns-top-spot-on-list-of-north-america-s/article_4126c6e0-150a-11e9-b4c7-bbe097dab3de.html?fbclid=IwAR3r7KkEgVnB0TZT2ZG1aHoQsFWwnDlSekeuTgPyjFIv4mpmqBP1bQlhpoA

 

Also making the list...Norfolk, VA.  Cuz who knows romance like the Navy?

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12 hours ago, jdm00 said:

I'd love to get a European take on this whole discussion.  For all the feelings of superiority that someone living on the coasts or in Chicago may have, I wonder if the typical European sees any difference in the level of "culture" between Grove City and Chicago.  

 

(Which is not to pick on Grove City; it seems like a pretty typical suburb when I drive through it.)  

 

 

 

No, do pick on Grove City. It deserves it. People dress like 2003 and it's our most hillbilly major suburb. Some of the smaller ones such as Valleyview and Obetz might be lamer but they're pretty small and insignificant.

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6 hours ago, GCrites80s said:

 

No, do pick on Grove City. It deserves it. People dress like 2003 and it's our most hillbilly major suburb. Some of the smaller ones such as Valleyview and Obetz might be lamer but they're pretty small and insignificant.

Now quit hating on the uncool crescent! lol  And I am too old to even know the difference between dressing like 2003 and now..sweatpants/jeans/pullover shirts/tee shirts then, same now....??? (comfort always wins with me).  It did really go for Trump though so.....

Edited by Toddguy

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8 hours ago, X said:

Nashville earns top spot on list of North America's most romantic cities

Kara Apel

Updated 7 hrs ago | Posted on Jan 10, 2019

 

NASHVILLE (WSMV) - Music City has made another top 10 list just in time for Valentine's Day.

Nashville has earned the top spot on DatingAdvice.com's "North America's 10 Most Romantic Cities" guide.

The article reads: "We think Nashville is the most romantic city in North America because there’s so much to do and see here, and yet couples can also be content doing nothing at all except sitting with a drink and enjoying the friendly Southern atmosphere."

 

https://www.wsmv.com/news/nashville-earns-top-spot-on-list-of-north-america-s/article_4126c6e0-150a-11e9-b4c7-bbe097dab3de.html?fbclid=IwAR3r7KkEgVnB0TZT2ZG1aHoQsFWwnDlSekeuTgPyjFIv4mpmqBP1bQlhpoA

 

Also making the list...Norfolk, VA.  Cuz who knows romance like the Navy?

LOL! Brought to us from Datingadvice.com! LMAO! Doesn't this belong in the stupid city ranking/ list thread?

Edited by Toddguy

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4 hours ago, Toddguy said:

Now quit hating on the uncool crescent! lol  And I am too old to even know the difference between dressing like 2003 and now..sweatpants/jeans/pullover shirts/tee shirts then, same now....??? (comfort always wins with me).  It did really go for Trump though so.....

 

Well, dressing like it's 2003 in 2019 certainly isn't as shocking as dressing like 1978 in 1986, that's for sure.

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2 hours ago, GCrites80s said:

 

Well, dressing like it's 2003 in 2019 certainly isn't as shocking as dressing like 1978 in 1986, that's for sure.

 

I wouldn't be so sure of that, Frosted tips and nu metal fashion are pretty embarassing.   First half of the early 2000s decade's fashion was as bad as its music.

 

Guy Fieri is my generation's disco stu.

Edited by neilworms

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On 1/11/2019 at 10:06 AM, GCrites80s said:

 

Well, dressing like it's 2003 in 2019 certainly isn't as shocking as dressing like 1978 in 1986, that's for sure.

That was a huge change...I was born in 63 so I remember it well. Things are a bit more diverse now with a number of trends and anti-trends going on at the same time. A good thing really.

 

From Travolta Disco suits to Miami Vice linen jackets lol. (I bought one of those Don Johnson linen jackets at Northland Mall...and actually wore it around *so ashamed*)

Edited by Toddguy

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At my high school a history teacher staged "Leisure Suit Day" beginning sometime in the late 80s.  You got extra credit if you wore a thrift store leisure suit to school.  It got cancelled when I was a freshman because it had gotten so out-of-hand the year prior. 

 

Speaking of the 80s, I watched a Huey Lewis & the News documentary earlier this week.  Somebody was the first guy in LA to wear a sport coat over a t-shirt, and it's sort-of been the backbone of men's fashion in LA ever since.  Yeah, this video's in San Francisco, but if anything that illustrates how few bands that came out of the Bay were actually stereotypical "San Francisco" Bands.  Grateful Dead?  Yeah.  Metallica?  No.  Huey Lewis & The News?  No.  Primus?  No.  Dead Kennedys?  Hell no. 

 

 

That just made me think about how many big bands came out of SF Bay -- WAY more than Nashville, but hey, Nashville is "Music City" because they said they are. 

 

 

Edited by jmecklenborg

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^yeah, in the 80s, there was a vague but very real 1950s revival, to the detriment of the 60s and 70s. 

 

The famous Weezer video was a spoof on a late 1970s show about the 1950s.  The means at some point we're going to get a revival of the That 70s Show. 

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7 hours ago, jmecklenborg said:

At my high school a history teacher staged "Leisure Suit Day" beginning sometime in the late 80s.  You got extra credit if you wore a thrift store leisure suit to school.  It got cancelled when I was a freshman because it had gotten so out-of-hand the year prior. 

 

Speaking of the 80s, I watched a Huey Lewis & the News documentary earlier this week.  Somebody was the first guy in LA to wear a sport coat over a t-shirt, and it's sort-of been the backbone of men's fashion in LA ever since.  Yeah, this video's in San Francisco, but if anything that illustrates how few bands that came out of the Bay were actually stereotypical "San Francisco" Bands.  Grateful Dead?  Yeah.  Metallica?  No.  Huey Lewis & The News?  No.  Primus?  No.  Dead Kennedys?  Hell no. 

 

 

That just made me think about how many big bands came out of SF Bay -- WAY more than Nashville, but hey, Nashville is "Music City" because they said they are. 

 

 

 

 

Metallica wasn't a true San Francisco band having formed in L.A. They didn't get far with L.A. crowds in 1982 since they wanted Ratt, Steeler, Bitch, Van Halen and other more visual bands. Cliff Burton issued the San Francisco Ultimatum (move up here or I'm not in) which ended up working out very well for Metallica as far as crowd response goes. The East Bay punk/thrash movement was much more receptive especially once punk and metal made up around 1986 on both coasts. Testament, Vio-Lence and Heathen all came out of this scene. Megadeth and Slayer were all L.A. though, once people got used to metal bands not wearing makeup. pssst... Slayer wore makeup too.

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I like visiting Nashville. Broadway is awesome and theres plenty to do.

 

The traffic was surprisingly very bad in my experience however. Horrendous compared to similar sized metros I've been in such as Indy and Columbus, and its not like its got the excuse of being a coastal city where access can only come from one direction. Not sure I'd enjoy living there because I spent significant time in commuter filled traffic jams.

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