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KJP

Rural Ohio is dying

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10 hours ago, audidave said:

 I’ve been biking the towpath and completed it to Bolivar.  All the towns seem to be in decent shape that I’ve been to. I think it definitely helps having good micro and nano breweries in many of these towns. I’d even say that a sign of a healthy town is that it has a brewery. 

 

Canal Fulton is on that route, but its growth and health is definitely is driven by Akron/Canton/Jackson Township sprawl. The towpath trail though has also helped tremendously at putting it on the map. I have a friend that owns the Canal Boat lounge on the towpath, her and her husband get tons of business from the trail...they love Ralph Regula (despite being blue blood dems). To the west and south of there is mostly Amish country small towns, which seems to create a healthy micro economy of its own (kind of like Mexican enclaves in Chicago do). 

 

11 hours ago, Gnoraa said:

I grew up in Western Ohio in Mercer County.  Mercer County continues to hold a healthy unemployment rate anywhere from 2.6% - 2.9% depending on the monthly reports.

 

I have been visiting my folks at a lake for 4th of july near Mt Gilead for a few years now. From Chicago, I have been taking Route 30 instead of the Turnpike for the last 3 years, and taken a few detours to explore nearby towns in NW Ohio. Some of those small towns don't seem that bad off, like Van Wert, Bucyrus, Galion. I was surprised. Lima and Mansfield however seem too small to attract jobs and too big to be cute and quaint and are pretty rough.

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I actually think downtown Mansfield is kinda nice... cool public square area... and has some potential. It's definitely rough though. 

Edited by mu2010

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The state highways like 33 and 32 are basically interstate-quality, and enable people from rural Southeast Ohio to commute to and from Columbus or Cincinnati each day.  The Lancaster and Nelsonville bypasses were pretty huge improvements.  It's only an hour drive now from Athens to DT Columbus, which is similar to the drive time from Miami U to DT Cincinnati, which nobody previously thought as being remote in the way that Athens is known for being remote. 

 

Also, the rail line from Athens to Columbus is now barely used thanks to the collapse of coal as is the line from Portsmouth to Cincinnati.  Each could have a pair of state-operated passenger trains on them making laps all day long. 

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16 hours ago, 327 said:

Ohio's been in the shitter for a while, that's not news.  But this map says Buffalo is "more vital" than Houston or Miami.

 

No, it's change in vitality. It says Buffalo basically stayed the same and Houston and Miami went down. But they could both still be higher than Miami. No way to say without looking at the raw data. 

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The internet snuck up on the government. They were very slow to enforce state sales taxes and/or come up with a new way to tax sales.  For example, they could have slapped a $10 flat fee on each shipment that would have been returned to the county where the order was placed.  If a multi-item order from Amazon, et al, was filled from multiple shipping locations, the fee would be applied to each item delivered. 

 

Everyone thought It was so great when the internet escaped utility-like regulation back in the 90s, but be careful what you wish for. 

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I wouldn't say it snuck up, I think it arrived at a time when taxes were out of vogue and both parties were unwilling to pursue the issue.

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Nobody that had a voice in the mainstream media of the '90s and early 2000s could see or was willing to talk about any possible downsides of the internet except maybe obesity and poor socialization.

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I remember ordering thousands of dollars worth of photo equipment in the late 90s and paying zero sales tax.  Local shops couldn't hope to compete. 

 

I remember when online ordering began for B&H Camera in New York circa 1997, you simply emailed them your credit card number and expiration date.  You didn't even have the option to email them the first eight digits and text them the second eight because text messaging didn't exist yet. 

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Just now, Robuu said:

^ That's insane. Email is so insecure.

 

There was no autofill form or anything.  It was like, the catalog told you to email Chuck in shipping the numbers out of the catalog with your choice of shipping via UPS or USPS, then he sent you a total, and then you emailed him your cc# and the expiration date.  The package showed up 3-4 days later, unless there was a Jewish holiday. 

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