Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
KJP

Cleveland sidewalks

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Dougal said:

Looking around for a suitable topic within which to discuss skywalks, I settled on this one. In the construction threads there has been considerable negative talk about the Jack Casino skyways.  I recently returned from a pleasant visit to the Canadian port of Halifax, where skywalks are called "pedways" and are part of an extensive system. The claimed benefits center on speed of walking, winter protection and pedestrian-vehicle seperation, also speeding up vehicle traffic. H'faxers (the locals claim a tougher winter than Cleveland's) are very happy with them.

 

The Halifax system:

800px-HalifaxPedwaySystemWeb.svg.png   

 

HongKong also has a very extensive system. (Can't find a map of it.) As does Chicago.  https://www.chicago.gov/content/dam/city/depts/cdot/pedestrian/Pedway/PedwayMap2013.pdf

 

With Cleveland's downtown retail consisting mostly of restaurants, it's a good time to think about a pedway system. A portion could be nicely inserted into SHW's coming campus right from the start.

 

 

 

Houston has an underground system,  however, their system is used because of the heat and humidity.

 

I'm against any skybridge or tunnel system.  We need people at grade on streets.  It's not as if out streets and roads are so crowded that we need alternative tunnels or bridges for pedestrians to move about the city.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, MyTwoSense said:

 

I'm against any skybridge or tunnel system.  We need people at grade on streets.  It's not as if out streets and roads are so crowded that we need alternative tunnels or bridges for pedestrians to move about the city.

 

I live in a city with a cold/wet winter, wet spring, and beastly hot summer; we are not good at clearing streets and sidewalks of snow.  Our traffic is a nightmare, affecting/delaying pedestrians as well as vehicles. Obviously I disagree; a pedway system would be great in Washington.

 

If the difficulty pedestrians encounter in Washington-style all-day traffic jams could be forcast for Cleveland's future, the time to plan is now.

 

 


There's nothing wrong with optimism, as long as you don't get your hopes up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Dougal said:

 

I live in a city with a cold/wet winter, wet spring, and beastly hot summer; we are not good at clearing streets and sidewalks of snow.  Our traffic is a nightmare, affecting/delaying pedestrians as well as vehicles. Obviously I disagree; a pedway system would be great in Washington.

 

If the difficulty pedestrians encounter in Washington-style all-day traffic jams could be forcast for Cleveland's future, the time to plan is now.

 

 

Where you live had no barring how Cleveland functions today or in the future.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what i would most love to see downtown someday is significant road taken out for sidewalks to be widened.

 

crossing the main drags is like a class three climbing scramble ('a rope might be carried, little belaying needed').

 

ha.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cleveland arguably already has a Pedestrian tunnel / footbridge systems at the Cleveland Clinic. Medical centers are of course different from Central Business Districts with a different clientele which may need more protections from the environment. Regardless of the merits of this system though, one definitive outcome of this "above the sidewalk" approach is significantly decreased activity at the street level. An insular fortress where all needs are met from within the system is created, greatly decreasing the "spillover" effect the Clinic should have on the surrounding community. 

image.thumb.png.518ec6d9b23a367f9aaf499f03fcac8e.png

The pattern of development within (and around) the Clinic is complex and more than just a product of the sky-bridge/pedestrian passage way network, but its still an interesting local example of possible outcomes. The setbacks, lack of sidewalk activity or virtually any businesses at street level around and within the Clinic is one of the cities greatest blunders of the past few decades. Pursuing the development or expansion of a similar system in downtown would serve to only harm the city by keeping employees, residents and tourists off the cities sidewalks, away from existing businesses and pedestrian infrastructure. 

 

Cleveland sidewalks and street-life around the Clinic's bridges:

uo_sdwk2.thumb.JPG.06a7a9831eb09bb2488305fd1a07ad36.JPG

 

uo_sdwk3.thumb.JPG.6dc0d4b80f5ad502a2185d15e979f585.JPG

 

uo_sdwk.thumb.JPG.23894807131f35aed538216cabd6f786.JPG

Edited by NorthShore647
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While the clinic skywalk system is nice for us civilians, it's first purpose is to move patients (in beds and wheelchairs) beween operating, exam, and recovery rooms. It's a lot cheaper than having to use an ambulance every time someone goes from their room in the Miller Pavilion to an operating room in Taussig or Crile.

 

Not to mention that many people at the clinic are old, sick, and just not in the best shape. The  malls are busy in summer time, but from October to May youre going to have a hard time convincing someone who is 68, overweight, with heart and joint issues to walk in iffy weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, originaljbw said:

 

Not to mention that many people at the clinic are old, sick, and just not in the best shape. The  malls are busy in summer time, but from October to May youre going to have a hard time convincing someone who is 68, overweight, with heart and joint issues to walk in iffy weather.

 

I think you just described why the 68-year-old person is overweight, with heart and joint issues -- because they don't walk. Two of my 60-something-years-old suburban friends in Bay Village are overweight, diabetic, and have arthritic knees because they NEVER walk. Yet they said they would never set foot in Cleveland if they don't have to because it's unsafe. And yet they're not going to live much longer because of where they chose to live -- for safety reasons. And yes, I remind them of the irony. They are defensive and closed-minded.

  • Like 3

"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, KJP said:

 

I think you just described why the 68-year-old person is overweight, with heart and joint issues -- because they don't walk. Two of my 60-something-years-old suburban friends in Bay Village are overweight, diabetic, and have arthritic knees because they NEVER walk. Yet they said they would never set foot in Cleveland if they don't have to because it's unsafe. And yet they're not going to live much longer because of where they chose to live -- for safety reasons. And yes, I remind them of the irony. They are defensive and closed-minded.

And tell them to park and walk of surface streets at the Cleveland Clinic! It's in hough right I'm liable to be murdered! (End sarcasam)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...