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ColDayMan

City Pronunciations


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How do you pronounce Columbus?


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I think that's generally true with cities with "T" somewhere stuck in the word.  For example, no one from Dayton says "DayTon" but instead says "Day'in."  Ditto with "Atlanna" and "Sea-ah-uhl."

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On 10/17/2019 at 1:38 PM, ColDayMan said:

I think that's generally true with cities with "T" somewhere stuck in the word.  For example, no one from Dayton says "DayTon" but instead says "Day'in."  Ditto with "Atlanna" and "Sea-ah-uhl."

I agree with the other Dayton Seattle, but not Atlanta.  I pronounce the T.  The second "T" in Atlanta is soft with people with southern accents,IMO.  At the same time some Dixie Crats pronounce it At-lan-Ta.  When I work in the Atlanta office, I hear it pronounced both ways.

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31 minutes ago, westerninterloper said:

Clumbiss

Day'in

Clevelun

T'ledo

SinsiNati

D'Troeet

ShiCawgo

 

Never heard any of those

I have heard

Ka-lum-bis

Day-Ton

CleaveLand

ToeLeeDo

Sin-Sa-Nat-Tee

DeeTroit

ShaCaGo

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9 hours ago, MyTwoSense said:

 

Never heard any of those

I have heard

Ka-lum-bis

Day-Ton

CleaveLand

ToeLeeDo

Sin-Sa-Nat-Tee

DeeTroit

ShaCaGo

 

You have DEFINITELY heard of Cleve'lin from black folks.  Just like Day'in, Sin (or Sis)-suh-nat-ee, Toe-lee-doh, Dee-troy't, and Shi-cah-go is common on urban radio.  I don't know any black person from Cleveland that pronounces the D at the end and I work up there once every two weeks.

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2 hours ago, Pugu said:

Kuh-LUM-bis    -- I'm in Cleveland. How do you people in Columbus say it?

 

Typical Columbusite will say that.  Some old timers, though, will say Clum-bis.


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7 hours ago, smith said:

Date-in

 

Foreigner! 


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On 10/17/2019 at 1:38 PM, ColDayMan said:

I think that's generally true with cities with "T" somewhere stuck in the word.  For example, no one from Dayton says "DayTon" but instead says "Day'in."  Ditto with "Atlanna" and "Sea-ah-uhl."

 

This would hold true for Mentor, which is always pronounced "Menner" by locals.

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7 hours ago, mu2010 said:

 

This would hold true for Mentor, which is always pronounced "Menner" by locals.


That’s the one where I can always tell the “not from here” newscasters lol.

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3 hours ago, DEPACincy said:

Cincinnat-uh is how my dad always sad it. 

 

In Philadelphia some old timers like to say Full-uff-ee-uh. Or even worse, Fluff-ee-uh.

Ooh, was never a fan of "Cincinnat-uh" lol. 

 

"K-LUMbus" 2.5 syllables. 

 

p.s. Newark NJ is "Nork." One syllable. And NJ is "Juhhh-zee" not "Joisy." 

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And yes, this is true.

 

tl-horizontal_main.jpg


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Appalachian folks in the area pronounce "Piqua" as "Pick-way."

 

While the pronunciation of "Versailles," Ohio has been notoriously anglicized, somehow the french pronunciation of the nearby village "Russia" almost survives (pronounced "Roo-shee").

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Yeah, the Miami Valley has some doozies of names.  Russia, Versailles, Wapakoneta, Piqua, Arcanum, and Celina are all fun ones to hear non-locals try to pronounce. 


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I once had a professor at an out of state school insist Cuyahoga was pronounced kai-ah-HOG-ah. I've always pronounced it kai-ah-HOE-gah like Randy Newman.

Edited by scorpio

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^ he was probably a commie lol!

 

i just remembered from my texas traveling days that boerne, a cool little place between austin and san antone, is pronounced bernie.

 

also, that one of my bg roomates from pittsburgh used to call elyria elly-rye-ah (its E-lear-E-ah).

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On 10/20/2019 at 11:59 PM, ColDayMan said:

 

You have DEFINITELY heard of Cleve'lin from black folks.  Just like Day'in, Sin (or Sis)-suh-nat-ee, Toe-lee-doh, Dee-troy't, and Shi-cah-go is common on urban radio.  I don't know any black person from Cleveland that pronounces the D at the end and I work up there once every two weeks.

I will give you "Cleve'lin".  Moost of the people I know have parents that stressed enunciation and pronunciation.

 

I don't know what hood rats you hangin' wit, but my people don't get down like that!

 

  do better marsai martin GIF by ABC Network

 

 

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in ny town -- probably most famously houston street is howston street, because unlike the big texas city its not named after sam houston.

 

and then maybe some of the dutch stuff is a little hard to say, like schermerhorn street in downtown brooklyn is skemerhorn and the van wyck is van wick, not whyk.

 

for the bronx the heavy duty italian neighborhood of throgs neck is still very definitely an old school ny trogs neck pronounciation. ha.

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, YABO713 said:

How has no one brought up Bala Cynwyd (Bala Kin-Wood) outside of Philly

 

It's a little more like Kin-Wid. 

 

Then there's Manayunk (Manny-Yunk), Passyunk (Pa-Shunk), and Schuylkill (Skoo-cool). 

 

And also Moyamensing Street, which is pronounced just like it is spelled but means "pigeon droppings" in Lenape. Pigeon Sh*t Street.

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27 minutes ago, mrnyc said:

maybe some of the dutch stuff is a little hard to say

As someone who knows how to pronounce Dutch syllables, I assure you it's no easier to decipher how NYers are going to pronounce things with Dutch names. I guess the exception might be something like Schermerhorn, where I would know that the CH doesn't just merge with the S to make an English SH sound. The closest thing to an SH in Dutch is actually SJ (as in the 'hasj' you can buy at one of the Netherlands' famous coffeeshops). The CH makes a throat-clearing K sound (so like KHH?), which is the same sound a G makes ('Gouda' (the town and the cheese) is pronounced khhowda). Extra fun when they appear next to each other, like in the word 'gracht' (that's what a canal is called). All the UYs you see should be pronounced more like OW (as in the English word 'cow'). So Stuyvesant should be more like Stowfvesant than Stivesant. Also of note is that the Dutch OE is always like the OE in the English word 'shoe'. Guess what 'poep' is. Another one Americans consistently mispronounce is OO, which is a long O sound; 'boot' in Dutch means the same and is pronounced the same as the English 'boat'. Remember that one the next time you purchase some stroopwafels, which I recommend you do ASAP because they're delicious.

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2 hours ago, DEPACincy said:

 

 

And also Moyamensing Street, which is pronounced just like it is spelled but means "pigeon droppings" in Lenape. Pigeon Sh*t Street.

 

 

good one -- and that reminds me -- rockaway is pronounced rockaway and it is a corrupted lenape neighborhood name -- from wiki:

 

The name "Rockaway" is the later corruption of a Lenape language word that sounded phonetically something like "rack-a-wak-e", and referred to the area. It may have meant "place of sands" (see: Toponymy of New Netherland and Metoac#Exonyms).

 

 

another one out here with an interesting history is broadway:

 

Broadway was originally the Wickquasgeck trail, carved into the brush of Manhattan by its Native American inhabitants. This trail originally snaked through swamps and rocks along the length of Manhattan Island.

 

The Wecquaesgeek (also Manhattoe and Manhattan) were a Munsee-speaking band of Wappinger people who once lived along the east bank of the Hudson River in the southwest of today's Westchester County, New York.

 

The Dutch then called it the Heeren Wegh or Heeren Straat, meaning "Gentlemen's Way" or "Gentlemen's Street" – echoing the name of a similar street in Amsterdam.

 

It was re-named "Broadway" after the British took over the city, because of its unusual width.

 

Originally, it was Broadway Street downtown from the Battery to Wall Street and then a patchwork of names above it.

 

On February 14, 1899, the name "Broadway" was officially extended to the entire Broadway / Bloomingdale / Western Boulevard / Boulevard / Kingsbridge route.

 

 

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