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Sanctuary cities-the rise of US city-states?

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Ohio's largest cities are the source what little innovation, progress and tax base exists in Ohio. Without the 3Cs, Ohio becomes Nebraska or Mississippi. You really don't want to push them away....

 

Treasurer Mandel backs bill to ban sanctuary cities, hold officials criminally liable

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20170206/treasurer-mandel-backs-bill-to-ban-sanctuary-cities-hold-officials-criminally-liable


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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Ohio's largest cities are the source what little innovation, progress and tax base exists in Ohio. Without the 3Cs, Ohio becomes Nebraska or Mississippi. You really don't want to push them away....

 

Treasurer Mandel backs bill to ban sanctuary cities, hold officials criminally liable

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20170206/treasurer-mandel-backs-bill-to-ban-sanctuary-cities-hold-officials-criminally-liable

 

I love that Rep Keller's phone has been ringing off the hook about this issue.  In Middletown...  :roll: :roll: :roll:

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PA is working on legislation that would ban state funding to sanctuary cities. This could be a good precedent for Ohio to follow:

 

[Pennsylvania Senate Passes Bill Targeting Sanctuary Cities

 

http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/PA-Senate-Moves-Towards-Slashing-Phillys-Sanctuary-City-Funding-413100463.html

 

The Pennsylvania Senate advanced a measure on Tuesday that would cut off hundreds of millions of dollars in state subsidies to cities and counties that do not always honor detention requests from federal immigration authorities...

 

...Under the bill, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and more than a dozen counties, including many of the most populous counties, could lose access to state subsidies that last year totaled $1.3 billion, according to a Senate Appropriations Committee analysis.

 


 

This also touches on what a "real" sanctuary city is. Cincinnati, IMO, is not a sanctuary city has the Hamilton County Sheriff still cooperates with ICE and has no stated plans to change policy.

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What state funding does Ohio send to our cities?  Kasich has already decimated the local government fund.  I'm going by memory but I believe the sum has dropped from about $40 million to $20 million.  I'm not familiar with any city budget other than ours but Cincinnati could absorb a $20 million budget cut pretty easily by laying off about 10% of the police force and fire dept.  Cranley just went on a hiring spree and we got through the recession just fine with diminished police numbers and rolling fire dept brownouts. 

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Seems to me like this is all setting the stage for a much bigger conflict in a few years, one that could amount to a massive tax revolt by cities against their states that leads to reclaiming home rule powers, if not some degree of independence from them--perhaps even leading to something like the creation of additional federal districts modeled after the District of Columbia (via a new amendment)?

 

The question might come down to one of how much states depend on their cities to balance their budgets. In states like Ohio and Pennsylvania that have multiple major cities, I'm guessing this ends up being quite a bit. There might also be some compelling reason for the core cities and their suburbs to join forces within a broader effort to push back at punitive state measures. Probably, protecting immigrants will not be this incentive. My guess would be deeper state cuts to local funding while imposing taxes to make up state budget deficits.

 

This is all hypothetical of course, but we do seem to be in unusual times.

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Definitely, the cities subsidize the largely declining rural areas of all states.  But states don't really do that much.  The single largest budget item for states is Medicaid, which is often upwards of half of a state's budget.  The state TOD's are funded by gasoline taxes and largely operate outside the purview of the state legislatures.  In Ohio, the governor appoints its director and shuffles the board -- that's how Kasich yanked the streetcar funds earmarked for Cincinnati. 

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Liberals and conservatives prefer to live in areas where people are more like them and certainly visit websites and social media that align with their views. It's why we have increasing political polarization and if this continues, I suspect that this will soon result in some major political and possibly border realignments. Perhaps it's for the better.

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-human-beast/201210/why-liberal-hearts-bleed-and-conservatives-dont


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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^"Four times as many Republicans as Democrats have mud rooms in their houses!"

 

Well Duh, that's because more Republicans than Democrats have farming or construction jobs.  :-)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rural divide

America’s cultural divide runs deep. While rural and urban Americans share some economic challenges, they frequently diverge on questions of culture and values. On few issues are they more at odds than immigration.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/national/rural-america/?tid=ss_tw


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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I watched the video in the article link. It's interesting to see how different the priorities are between rural, suburban and urban folks. Crime is apparently the biggest problem according to urban people. Drug abuse is the biggest problem according to suburbanites. Jobs are the biggest problem in rural America.

 

I just don't understand how rural people think. How could you live in the middle of nowhere and expect jobs to come your way? You better start farming all that land you sit on and sell your sh!t at Farmers market in the city or else your physical location is pretty irrelevant to the economy. They bought into that self-sufficiency crap and they're mad because living in the boonies isn't working out? Hello?

 

A major shift happened world-wide in the last decade - cities trade with each other more than nations do and more people world-wide now live in metro areas than rural areas. It's because despite technology, cities operate like efficient organisms and they'll always be relevant. Rural folks need to get with the times. Take all that government money you're getting for your fraudulent disability claim or the food stamps youre selling, pack your sh!t and go to the nearest city to start a new life.

 

I don't have any sympathy for someone who lives in the middle of nowhere, complaining about the lack of job opportunity. I'm also sick of hearing about coal. They act like they were all once coal miners. Not all of their former jobs are going to immigrants. They're just irrelevant jobs in today' world and if you want to know the truth, the biggest job stealers (for manufacturing and distribution and other stuff that they're accustomed to) are conservative white suburbs and exurbs.

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States are declaring war on cities so the GOP can take them over too the same way they've gerrymandered control of rural areas and turned them into jobless wastelands of pale, fat, isolated, hate-based Christians. Dear GOPers, let the cities go off on their own and form city-states that are fiscally and legally walled off from the surrounding wastelands...

___________

 

Democrats' only real political strongholds these days are big cities, but even that power center "is increasingly under attack," in places including Cleveland, according to this analysis from The New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/06/upshot/blue-cities-want-to-make-their-own-rules-red-states-wont-let-them.html?_r=0

 

From the piece:

 

In the last few years, Republican-controlled state legislatures have intensified the use of what are known as pre-emption laws, to block towns and cities from adopting measures favored by the left. The states aren't merely overruling local laws; they've walled off whole new realms where local governments aren't allowed to govern at all.

 

The pattern has worsened a different kind of partisan war beyond Washington, where the political divide cuts not just across the aisle, but across different levels of government. As standoffs between red states and blue cities grow more rancorous, the tactics of pre-emption laws have become personal and punitive: Several states are now threatening to withhold resources from communities that defy them and to hold their elected officials legally and financially liable.

 

The newspaper notes that states recently have banned local ordinances on minimum wage increases, paid sick days and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights. Legal scholars tell The Times that the pre-emption laws echo 19th-century "ripper bills" that ripped control from cities over their finances, utilities, police forces and local charters. Home rule is under a "troubling nationwide assault," warn municipal lawyers and law professors in an amicus brief supporting a legal fight in Cleveland.

 

"There, Ohio passed a law blocking a longstanding requirement that city construction contracts hire some local workers. Cleveland, in other words, was trying to ensure that local projects created local jobs, alleviating local poverty," The Times notes.

 

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20170706/BLOGS03/170709922/in-ohio-and-elsewhere-state-legislatures-assert-their-muscle-at-the


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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I watched the video in the article link. It's interesting to see how different the priorities are between rural, suburban and urban folks. Crime is apparently the biggest problem according to urban people. Drug abuse is the biggest problem according to suburbanites. Jobs are the biggest problem in rural America.

 

I just don't understand how rural people think. How could you live in the middle of nowhere and expect jobs to come your way? You better start farming all that land you sit on and sell your sh!t at Farmers market in the city or else your physical location is pretty irrelevant to the economy. They bought into that self-sufficiency crap and they're mad because living in the boonies isn't working out? Hello?

 

A major shift happened world-wide in the last decade - cities trade with each other more than nations do and more people world-wide now live in metro areas than rural areas. It's because despite technology, cities operate like efficient organisms and they'll always be relevant. Rural folks need to get with the times. Take all that government money you're getting for your fraudulent disability claim or the food stamps youre selling, pack your sh!t and go to the nearest city to start a new life.

 

I don't have any sympathy for someone who lives in the middle of nowhere, complaining about the lack of job opportunity. I'm also sick of hearing about coal. They act like they were all once coal miners. Not all of their former jobs are going to immigrants. They're just irrelevant jobs in today' world and if you want to know the truth, the biggest job stealers (for manufacturing and distribution and other stuff that they're accustomed to) are conservative white suburbs and exurbs.

 

You can't make money farming anymore thanks to all of the industrial-scale farming in California and in the great plains.  Farming is now an expensive hobby, even for real farmers.  If they want to really bring jobs back to "rural America", we would need to break up the farming companies and as a country agree to spend 2x-3x for our food. 

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I predict that the biggest backlash in the near future from food critics/ health and wellness snobs, will entail the realization from these consumers that top soil in the great plains region along with California has been almost entirely depleted. That means that there are hardly any nutrients left in the soil and therefore, the food being consumed isn't nearly as nutritious and good for you. It's completely reasonable and not very hard to understand for the every-day consumer. It's been recently reported that six inches of top soil has been depleted from the Grate Planes as a result of non-stop harvesting and zero replenishment over so many decades (replenishment being something that happens in a truly natural environment.)

 

I've spoken before about it and given examples of how soil is carelessly being depleted from our neighborhoods, even problematic in cities and well-established 'foresty' inner-ring suburbs like Shaker Heights, where it's still beautiful yet there is a century-long tradition of removing grass and weeds by landscapers, to other areas of town for aesthetic reasons - the ridiculous importance placed on 'well-manicured lawns.' So much of Shaker Heights has clay as top soil. Ha.

 

You think that doesn't effect the quality of the soil when you do nothing but pull up the plants and remove them without allowing more organic matter to make its way onto the soil? You think that doesn't constitute depletion?! Imagine how bad it is in areas/regions where we harvest crops nonstop and it's all strictly business!

 

For some reason, no one else chimed in with any information or opinions when I spoke about that. I can't help but think it's simply a matter of everyone else not wanting to confront a very inconvenient truth. What are we going to do about it? What is the solution? No one cares, at least right now. If me and you all aren't f-ed in the future, our kids and grandkids certainly will be.

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Almost every piece of land east of the Mississippi was farmed at one point (even Manhattan).  But not only does the United States have a lot of good farmland, it has a lot of great farmland.  So the merely good farmland in places like Southwest/east Ohio and Southeast Indiana has been returning to woods as much higher yield mechanized farming continues further west.  Seeing the irrigated Central Valley farms in California is really impressive.  It has to rank among the most productive farmland in the world.

 

NPR aired an hour-long feature this past weekend on a guy who returned to his native North Carolina after a career in Washington, DC to operate his own hog operation.  He had 250-400 hogs on average.  He had the farm for 20 years but his most profitable year only netted $14,000.  He ran into trouble with FSA loans and the farm was taken from him.  He and his wife still had their pensions, so they weren't broke, but I think the story illustrated just how futile any family-sized farming or livestock operation promises to be. 

 

 

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The New Localism: my piece @FT on how power -- and responsibility for problem solving -- are shifting to cities https://t.co/YOh6grVqgA


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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I heard that up until lately, Cincy police would turn suspected illegals over to ICE and they would end up releasing them anyway due to lack of resources

 

"Lately" being January 21st?

 

Seriously, it's a national decision what sorts of border controls we have and "sanctuary cities" undermine that. 

 

 

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But America is the land of the free.... https://t.co/2EBfRmQN8e


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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If we're not going to have competitive political races in Ohio, then that leads to bad politics and ultimately a bad economy. Seems like the powers-that-be are writing off Ohio. So what do we do? Stay and fight? Leave? Or maybe consider a more radical solution like letting parts of the state that want to remain relevant find their own destinies?

 

Prominent Democratic super PAC says Ohio isn’t a top priority in 2020

https://www.cleveland.com/politics/2019/03/prominent-democratic-super-pac-says-ohio-isnt-a-top-priority-in-2020.html?fbclid=IwAR1vYWgUhTGklfCl9YA52M7vXadALz9dQFVCqtIdDa4fWoDy8YShZOaHHMs


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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I think Ohio is going the way of Missouri. The election of Mike Dewine in a blue wave year (at least in the House) seemed to indicate that Ohio is firmly a red state with some blue counties, rather than a true 'purple' state. Would love to be proven wrong here, but it seems like the Dems nationally have kind of conceded Ohio, and have focused more on Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and some of the new purple states in the West, like Arizona and Nevada.

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Super PACs representing high-dollar donors are what gave us candidate Hillary.  More disheartening to me is how little change there has been in Ohio's democratic leadership, after a decade of failure that really sticks out nationally.  What is our plan for smaller cities?  What is our plan for rural voters?  Do we even have a plan for Cleveland?

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It’s interesting that the resolution was introduced by rural Republicans who felt that Chicago has too much power, whereas in Ohio the 3Cs could be promoting city-statehood for the lack of power they have....

 

Politicians look to separate Chicago from Illinois to create 51st state

https://abcnews.go.com/US/resolution-proposes-separating-chicago-illinois-create-51st-state/story


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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The "Big Sort" is about to be institutionalized and intensified.....

 

 


"Most of us have been conditioned to regard military combat as exciting and glamorous -- an opportunity for men to prove their competence and courage. Since armies are legal, we feel that war is acceptable; in general, nobody feels that that war is criminal or that accepting it is a criminal attitude. In fact, we have been brainwashed. War is neither glamorous nor attractive. It is monstrous. Its very nature is one of tragedy and suffering" --Dalai Lama

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Surely the state of Ohio and the federal government will cut off funding to these counties that have stated their intention to flaunt state and federal laws:

 

Quote

 

Clermont County becomes latest to pass Second Amendment sanctuary resolution

 

CLERMONT COUNTY, Ohio (WKRC) - Clermont County Commissioners voted to adopt a resolution that would make Clermont County a second amendment sanctuary.

It passed unanimously.

 

Second amendment sanctuary refers to gun rights.

 

It would protect the right to bear arms even if state or federal laws are passed restricting ownership or possession. 

 

The resolution says the county will not "appropriate funds, resources, employees or agencies to initiate unconstitutional seizures". It also demands that "state and national legislatures cease and desist any further actions restricting the Second Amendment rights of citizens and instead address the real and fundamental challenges in our communities".

 

 

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13 hours ago, taestell said:

Surely the state of Ohio and the federal government will cut off funding to these counties that have stated their intention to flaunt state and federal laws:

 

 

 

Pure symbolism.   Ohio is already solid on the Second Amendment.  Hell, the last Democratic governor won with the NRA's endorsement, and the state blocks cities from passing tougher laws than theirs.

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13 hours ago, taestell said:

Surely the state of Ohio and the federal government will cut off funding to these counties that have stated their intention to flaunt state and federal laws:

 

 

Imagine being an elected county commissioner and thinking this was a good use of time.

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1 hour ago, mu2010 said:

Imagine being an elected county commissioner and thinking this was a good use of time.

 

Oh it's certainly virtue signalling, much like another county government I could name is prone to.

 

But at least it's not placing any burden on the private sector.

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1 hour ago, E Rocc said:

 

Oh it's certainly virtue signalling, much like another county government I could name is prone to.

 

But at least it's not placing any burden on the private sector.

 

Bookmark this. We'll see how it affects the economy in these counties. A lot of businesses don't want to locate to a place with that kind of crazy gun culture and a lot of people don't want to live there. I know I'm done spending money in Clermont County, as much as I love going to Jungle Jim's when I'm on my way to Athens.

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3 hours ago, E Rocc said:

the state blocks cities from passing tougher laws than theirs

 

Yes, the classic conservative line: "The best government is the government closest to the people, except when it's not."

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12 minutes ago, taestell said:

 

Yes, the classic conservative line: "The best government is the government closest to the people, except when it's not."

 

That's not me.   I'm all in favor of the power of government over the individual being limited whenever possible.   This includes by the supreme court.

 

 

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1 hour ago, DEPACincy said:

 

Bookmark this. We'll see how it affects the economy in these counties. A lot of businesses don't want to locate to a place with that kind of crazy gun culture and a lot of people don't want to live there. I know I'm done spending money in Clermont County, as much as I love going to Jungle Jim's when I'm on my way to Athens.

 

The thing is, when people don't think the right to keep and bear arms is being threatened, it's pretty low key.   

 

https://www.bestplaces.net/crime/county/ohio/clermont

 

Clermont County violent crime is 9.5. (The US average is 22.7)

Clermont County property crime is 32.6. (The US average is 35.4)

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1 hour ago, E Rocc said:

 

The thing is, when people don't think the right to keep and bear arms is being threatened, it's pretty low key.   

 

https://www.bestplaces.net/crime/county/ohio/clermont

 

Clermont County violent crime is 9.5. (The US average is 22.7)

Clermont County property crime is 32.6. (The US average is 35.4)

 

And yet, the suicide rate is the highest among the four counties in the Southwest Ohio region. And the county government is among the most corrupt in the state. It's a soul-sucking place. 

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