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Cleveland: Historic Preservation

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On this week's agenda is a house I don't know much about. But it deserves more attention. Seems that's the intent of this landmark nomination....

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/landmark/agenda/2016/10272016/index.php

 

CLEVELAND LANDMARK NOMINATION

Photo Gallery

 

1. Levi T. Scofield Residence

2438 Mapleside Road

Aka 2437 Baldwin Road

Ward 6

Mitchell

 

For background......

 

Levi Scofield House

The Historic Home of one of Cleveland's Finest Architects Slowly Crumbles

By Jim Dubelko

 

You can't walk through downtown Cleveland today without noticing and marveling at the ongoing restoration of the beautiful Scofield building, constructed in 1902 on the southwest corner of Euclid Avenue and East Ninth Street. And who hasn't visited Public Square without noticing the imposing 125-foot tall Soldiers and Sailors Monument there, dedicated in 1894 to Cleveland's Civil War heroes. But the magnificent mansion of the man who designed these two iconic Cleveland landmarks? Sitting for the last 117 years at 2438 Mapleside Road in the city's Buckeye-Woodhill neighborhood, hardly anyone notices it today. And, sadly, it is slowly crumbling into ruins.

 

MORE:

http://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/742#.WBDvCtIrKpo

 

e8adc8847e2aa6fe4dc494c0b1e94df3.jpg

 

35306ed7653e824a3d3db57652f18817.jpg

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That house is in really, really rough shape, and that's after having been altered a ton over the years for some kind of institutional housing (elderly?). I've always assumed the chances of restoration were nil, but maybe there's a glimmer here?  Amazing to think what the setting was like when this house was built, with a sweeping view over the east side.

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Google Earth has it marked with a religious institution icon and "Youth Devoted to Christ" whatever that is.  The front of the building is behind the later institutional building built along Baldwin, and the approach to the house is from the rear.

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There was an article on Cleveland.com a while back about this.  One of those situations where the lady that owns it wants to do something but doesn't have the money to do it. 

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I hope somebody with the time and money takes on the project before it meets the wrecking ball. It would have to be a labor of love.

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There was an article on Cleveland.com a while back about this.  One of those situations where the lady that owns it wants to do something but doesn't have the money to do it. 

 

Here's a story channel 5 that was done last year. .  Its in such bad shape the neighborhood is calling for it to be taken down. 

 

Nominating it for Landmark status is good and all, but not so much if there is no means of stabilizing it and nobody interested in taking it on.  In its current state, even with a Landmark designation it would receive approval for demolition due to its unsafe condition. 

 

MTS you should consider this.....  I would help with the process of applying for tax credits. 

 

http://www.newsnet5.com/news/clevelands-scofield-mansion-is-now-a-hazard-residents-are-concerned-about-neighborhood-safety

 

 

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Just pulled it on Google Street Views, where you can only see a corner of the house.  I never traverse this pocket neighborhood which seems cut off from the world but probably has some nice views of downtown, UC, ... the lake?..    While there appears to be some decay here and CMHA buildings (Woodhill Estates) at the edge, it appears to be fairly in tact (per Google 2014) including many well kept homes.  Hope they save this place although it looks in pretty bad shape.  It could be a positive catalyst for the neighborhood generally. 

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Just posted by Michelle Jarboe.  So they are trying to designate in the hopes of being able to apply for historic tax credits.  They would have to get it out of the hands of the current owner though.  One that has mounting unpaid property taxes. 

 

Levi Scofield's Cleveland mansion, long vacant, grabs preservationists' attention (photos)

 

...local nonprofit groups are mounting a last-ditch – and admittedly risky – campaign to save the Scofield mansion. The Cleveland Restoration Society has applied for a $10,000 Ohio History Fund grant to kick off a preservation push. Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, which has experience in financing and developing tricky projects, is trying to structure an agreement with the Cuyahoga Land Bank to get the property into responsible hands.

 

http://realestate.cleveland.com/realestate-news/2016/10/levi_scofields_cleveland_mansi.html#incart_river_home

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After doing some Streetviews around the neighborhood, it's surprising to me how well maintained some of the yards and houses are. My last drive through the Mt. Carmel neighborhood 20+ years ago was actually pretty scary, with groups of young people in the streets confronting my car. Many of the homes were abandoned and the yards were overgrown. There was garbage everywhere. I hadn't been back since. Now I will go back.

 

I suggest also a Bing birdseye view of the house. It's not very flattering, but it's probably the best way you can see it.

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The unpaid taxes may be the best thing though. Can't a county land bank or similar get control and wipe the slate clean, and then transfer ownership to a redevelopment group for $1?  This would allow all funds to go towards rebuilding instead of purchase and back taxes.

Is this possible?

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The unpaid taxes may be the best thing though. Can't a county land bank or similar get control and wipe the slate clean, and then transfer ownership to a redevelopment group for $1?  This would allow all funds to go towards rebuilding instead of purchase and back taxes.

Is this possible?

 

Yes.  Thats exactly what they are trying to do. 

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The unpaid taxes may be the best thing though. Can't a county land bank or similar get control and wipe the slate clean, and then transfer ownership to a redevelopment group for $1?  This would allow all funds to go towards rebuilding instead of purchase and back taxes.

Is this possible?

 

Yes.  Thats exactly what they are trying to do.

 

Whoops- sorry, I had typed out that post earlier but didn't "post" it.  When I came back to the site and saw it hanging on my screen, I finally did post it. Meanwhile, you had posted the article. Thanks for doing that! I really hope this has a good outcome. It could be spectacular as a condo conversion.

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Through the stained glass: Cleveland Restoration Society's mission to restore historic churches

Karin Connelly Rice | Tuesday, October 24, 2017

 

If a beautifully lit church has ever caught your eye while driving down I-71, you can thank Cleveland Restoration Society (CRS). Through its Sacred Landmarks Assistance Program, 19 of the city’s steeples and bell towers along the busy interstate freeway have been illuminated as part of its Steeple Lighting Program.

 

And that’s not all the organization is shining a light on: On Saturday, Nov. 4, CRS will celebrate Cleveland's hundreds of historic places of worship—and their ongoing renovation efforts—with its annual benefit, Shining a Light on Cleveland’s Sacred Landmarks.

 

“Northeast Ohio is blessed with hundreds of historically significant religious properties that represent the finest craftsmanship and architectural talent of their day,” says Michael Fleenor, director of preservation services for the Cleveland Restoration Society. “These buildings reflect and embody the spiritual and cultural traditions of their congregations, whose rich histories are still evident.”

 

http://www.freshwatercleveland.com/breaking-ground/SacredLandmarks102417.aspx?utm_source=Emma&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Through+the+stained+glass%3a+Cleveland+Restoration+Society%27s+mission+to+restore+historic+churches&utm_content=Newsletter&utm_campaign=This+Cleveland+Clinic+doctor+is+close+to+making+breast+and+ovarian+cancer+vaccines+a+reality

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Was going to post this in the Euclid Grand thread, since someone asked about facade coverups and if there were any remaining downtown, but that would have drifted off topic.  Does anyone know if there is anything historic behind the facade of 1404 E 9th, the Cathedral Square Plaza building with CVS on the ground floor?  Property records indicate it was constructed in 1920.

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37 minutes ago, sizzlinbeef said:

Was going to post this in the Euclid Grand thread, since someone asked about facade coverups and if there were any remaining downtown, but that would have drifted off topic.  Does anyone know if there is anything historic behind the facade of 1404 E 9th, the Cathedral Square Plaza building with CVS on the ground floor?  Property records indicate it was constructed in 1920.

 

I think you might be right, at least the northern portion of the building. I attached an aerial from 1963 and you can see a building that matches the profile of 1404 E 9th. If you go down Theresa Ct., you can see the northern and western facades are made of brick, similar to the building seen below. But at some point, it looks like the insert in the middle of the building was filled in. 

2.png

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