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http://beattydevelopment.com/projects/harbor-point/

 

Located between Harbor East and historic Fells Point, Harbor Point will be a vibrant, highly integrated neighborhood with a focus on sustainability and innovation. As the City’s largest downtown, waterfront site yet to be developed, Harbor Point will be composed of 3 million square feet of mixed-use space on 27 acres and will be the leading development showcasing Baltimore’s urban renaissance. The neighborhood will feature thoughtfully designed public space including 9.5 acres of waterfront parks and a promenade along the water’s edge.

Design phase / under construction

9.5 acres of open space

910 Residential Units

220,000 SF of Hotel

200,000 SF of Retail

3300 Parking Spaces

3,000,000 SF Mixed-Use Development

1.6 million of SF of Class A Office

Harbor Point Open in Google Maps

 

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A towering, white, modular-looking apartment complex could be the newest addition to the Harbor East waterfront, filling a Central Avenue parking lot with nearly 350 residences and a block of shopping.

 

The roughly $100 million proposal by H&S Properties Development Corp. and The Bozzuto Group calls for 291 apartments, 49 condominiums and roughly 60,000 square feet of retail on the block bordered by Central Avenue and Aliceanna, Lancaster and Eden streets. The building also would contain an interior parking garage, a pool and other amenities.

 

More below:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bs-bz-whole-foods-harbor-east-20150212-story.html

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updatedentry*750xx3600-2025-0-1.jpg

 

The Recreation Pier hotel project in Fells Point will become an extension of the Under Armour Inc. brand and a tool for attracting people to the city.

That's how Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank sees his $60 million investment in the conversion of the 100-year-old pier and head house into an "incredibly nice" 128-room hotel. Plank plans to celebrate the groundbreaking of the hotel during a ceremony Wednesday. Plank's privately held real estate company, Sagamore Development Co. LLC, is developing the project, which is expected to be completed in fall 2016.

 

Plank said in an interview Monday the hotel is part of a strategy to provide Under Armour guests with a unique Baltimore experience. That will include allowing people to depart the Under Armour headquarters in Tide Point on an authentic Chesapeake Bay crab boat, voyage across the Inner Harbor and arrive in style at the hotel.

 

More below:

http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/blog/real-estate/2015/03/kevin-plank-sees-fells-point-rec-pier-hotel-as-an.html

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77592_1440088585_broadwaymarketsouthrendering-large.jpg

 

The developer in charge of the long-awaited $4.2M makeover of the Broadway Market says the project could be back on track now that Gov. Larry Hogan has axed plans for the 4.2-mile Red Line. 

 

Construction on the rail project, which had included a stop at Aliceanna, would have halted leasing activity at the historic Fells Point attraction for three years, says WorkShop Development partner Richard Manekin. WorkShop says it's now actively reaching out to prospective food vendors for the market. It plans to renovate the north shed (pictured) and begin construction on a new building on the south side of the market spring '16, Richard says. Construction would wrap up spring '17.

 

More below:

https://www.bisnow.com/baltimore/news/commercial-real-estate/no-red-line-means-broadway-market-renovation-may-move-forward-49349

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900x506

 

A towering, white, modular-looking apartment complex could be the newest addition to the Harbor East waterfront, filling a Central Avenue parking lot with nearly 350 residences and a block of shopping.

 

The roughly $100 million proposal by H&S Properties Development Corp. and The Bozzuto Group calls for 291 apartments, 49 condominiums and roughly 60,000 square feet of retail on the block bordered by Central Avenue and Aliceanna, Lancaster and Eden streets. The building also would contain an interior parking garage, a pool and other amenities.

 

More below:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bs-bz-whole-foods-harbor-east-20150212-story.html

 

 

this is pretty awesome looking and a good example of a creative and nice fit for the site. if it lives up to the render of course, which i dont see why it shouldnt if they go with it.

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Meanwhile, in Cleveland, surface lots and prime lakefront sit another year with nothing happening and Cincinnati's riverfront has The Banks which look like they belong in Mason.  Ohio's cities are so far behind in the renaissance of old Great Lakes/NE cities.  Looks like some great stuff in happening in Baltimore.

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Sounds a little too 1960s-700 for me. Considering it's coming from Gov. Hogan, I'm not surprised....

 

Baltimore's $700 million demolition and redevelopment plan

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/west-baltimore/bs-md-ci-hogan-demolition-20160105-story.html


"Save the planet. Move to the city." -- The Downtowner podcast

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^Yeah, Baltimore has no reason for these demolitions of what are many times structurally sound historic landmarks. The city is growing again and is on the cusp of a gigantic boom of millennials priced out of DC. Washington DC is almost as expensive as Oakland. Baltimore is going to clean up on millennial transplants at some point. It's a huge bargain compared to other coastal cities:

 

DPQuEhj.png

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^Yeah, Baltimore has no reason for these demolitions of what are many times structurally sound historic landmarks. The city is growing again and is on the cusp of a gigantic boom of millennials priced out of DC. Washington DC is almost as expensive as Oakland. Baltimore is going to clean up on millennial transplants at some point. It's a huge bargain compared to other coastal cities:

 

DPQuEhj.png

 

That Chicago number is way inflated.  I think DNAinfo talked about this same study which was based off of Zillow listings which are IMO biased towards pricier properties. 1900/mo 1bdrm is River North prices or the top end of Wicker Park these days - its not reflective of even the majority of the North Side of Chicago nor does it represent the economically depress south or far west sides (one of the few hoods where this is low is in the west loop though).

 

You can live in a hip neighborhood for 1200-1600 a month for a 1 bd in most instances.

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^It's not inflated in the Bay. It's low for Oakland, and about on par for SF. It also looks about on par for NYC when you consider how expensive parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn have gotten (though obviously high for Queens and Bronx). Boston and DC look accurate too (though LA seems too high). Keep in mind these are only for new leases. Also, there will be variance due to vacancy differences. San Francisco and Oakland nearly always rent higher than list price because there will be dozens (or hundreds) of applicants getting into a bid war. Chicago might not have these bid wars.

 

*I think Chicago recently entered a rent boom. I have friends there telling me they're getting 10% rent hikes this year for the first time in their lives. Granted, the reaction to that from anybody in expensive cities is usually, "10%? Ha! That's nothing!" But it could be signaling a change in Chicago's legendary affordability. Its peer city Toronto has gotten more expensive (then again, Toronto is safer, cleaner, and has free healthcare), and Chicago is way too nice of a city to be cheaper than Oakland and San Jose. I'd say it's nicer than DC and Boston too. Chicago's core should be turning into NYC...

 

**Looking at trends, DC has gotten really bad, which was really what I was getting at. It's more expensive than San Jose and almost as expensive as Oakland. When one of those cities has the highest median income in the United States and the other one has the highest percentage of all-cash home sales, that's quite telling. DC still has ungentrified neighborhoods and it's this expensive! I see a lot of millennials trying to get out of DC here pretty soon. Baltimore ranks way down on this list. It's like half of DC rents.

 

***Chicago is certainly becoming a market where it makes more sense to buy than rent (this was really always the case). There is no rent control there, and home prices are still dirt cheap compared to any other global city in North America besides Montreal. As long as interest rates stay low, I see a big rent versus mortgage gap playing out in Chicago...

 

But the real key here is that Baltimore is way cheaper than all of these cities. It also has some of the best brick rowhousing in the United States, and it's still functionally urban despite lingering crime issues. Buying a place in Baltimore would be an incredibly smart investment. That is the city in America with by far the most upside potential. It's insane they're tearing down 4,000 buildings. Baltimore is America's next boom town...

 

I think by 2020, Baltimore hits 650,000-700,000 people. By 2030, 800,000+. I could see DC leveling off before that...

 

My brother, who is an ex-Chicagoan currently living in Baltimore, agrees with me on this. We're extremely bullish on its long-term prospects. It won't be a get rich quick type of property flipping town like Oakland, but it's a smart place to invest in urban property. It's undervalued and over-delivers on urban amenities.

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Baltimore will tear down whole blocks of row houses to fight blight. Is that wise?: https://t.co/bqjo5dfVQ7

 

I can understand demolishing homes in places like Cleveland, where much of the housing stock is made of up cheap, wood frame structures. But I question the long term effectiveness of demolishing brick row homes. It seems like those, more than the houses in Cleveland, would be more attractive for future redevelopment.

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^^If there is a market to rebuild, I don't see why not if the row houses are not historic or hold some type of special local history.  In Cleveland, we're left many times with urban prairies since there is no market to rebuild in many of the hard hit areas.

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Baltimore will tear down whole blocks of row houses to fight blight. Is that wise?: https://t.co/bqjo5dfVQ7

 

Nope. In five years, the demand will be there for those properties. Urban destruction like this is designed to immediately raise property values and increase the local tax base. Cities certainly have an alternative agenda when they destroy their neighborhoods. Ohio has been doing the same thing for the same reasons. The difference is demand is stronger in Baltimore, and in five years, I see it being called a boomtown for young people.

 

Ohio has much further to go than Baltimore, so some of the more far-gone stuff in Cleveland, Toledo, and Cincinnati won't make it. What Ohio's Rust Belt cities should do is focus on saving mixed use buildings, historic commercial buildings, and the best historic housing. Toledo's demolition policy has switched to that. It looks like Toledo is mostly tearing down wooden single family homes now, so they're being more surgical. Part of the reason Toledo is being more surgical is because they never got a big injection of demolition money...when they've done anything significant, it's because of a backdoor deal made with city/county money (like the Hotel Seagate). By not having much state or federal money, even the most demolition-happy politician can't accomplish much. Hence why Toledo still has a lot of carcasses of single family homes burnt down in the recession, particularly in second and third ring neighborhoods like West-Central Toledo.

 

Cities that get more demolitions funds are taking advantage of them.  :| It's a misguided use of public money.

 

*Baltimore's plan is the most offensive though since the city is in strong economic shape compared to the core Rust Belt cities, and its trajectory is nothing but up. The likes of Detroit, Toledo, Buffalo, Cincinnati, and even Pittsburgh are going to take a lot longer to really turn around. Baltimore has a realistic shot of reclaiming its historic population peak. I wouldn't say that about any other Rust Belt city.

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Toledo's demolition policy has switched to that. It looks like Toledo is mostly tearing down wooden single family homes now, so they're being more surgical.

 

That's sad considering how low grade much of Toledo's vernacular architecture is.  Places like STL (are there any frame buildings there?!) Cincy and Baltimore should have a similar mentality IMO and it would go much further given the quality of what's left.

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^The weird thing about Toledo is it doesn't really have its own vernacular architecture, at least not in significant quantity. It's a real hodgepodge of Chicago and Detroit architecture firms, and the influence of those two cities is obvious to see. There isn't a true Toledo style, and even the most historic neighborhoods are mixed. Some styles lasted a lot longer than in other cities. Toledo's Victorian era was longer and more widespread than it should have been, but many people attribute this to the wealth of the city in the early 20th century. Toledo is considered by some to have the most late-stage Victorian in the country outside of the San Francisco Bay Area (which rebuilt Victorian after 1906). Toledo's shipping port was one of the busiest in the world, not just the Great Lakes. This huge shipping history is something it shares with Baltimore, and then there is also the obvious parallel of shallow Chesapeake Bay with shallow Western Lake Erie (they both share major pollution issues today as well). Like Toledo, Baltimore also had a ton of manufacturing. Their industrial legacies have enough in common that Toledo has been studying Baltimore for decades trying to figure out why it is in so much better shape than the Glass City.

 

Toledo was pretty much all sunshine and rainbows up until the Great Depression, but it turned out to be a very pronounced bubble in Toledo. Toledo had its major banks fail before anywhere else, and unemployment soared well over 50%, an all-time high in a major American city. Up until the Great Depression, Victorian influences were seen in neighborhoods as far out as past the Toledo Zoo. Toledo somehow manages to maintain the largest surviving Victorian neighborhood in the nation outside of San Francisco. Old West End Toledo is really unique, and even glorious Buffalo doesn't have a whole lot of residential architecture quite on that level (though Buffalo is most similar to Toledo). It's super ornate...and now kind of ghetto, or at least right next to some bad ghetto areas. But even in the Old West End, other styles creep in. Northriver is like this too (mix of everything), as well as Old South End (mix of everything), and Vistula (more Italianate). Even East Toledo has more architectural diversity than people realize, but a lot of it has been poorly-maintained or stripped down.

 

It's the kind of city where you can see an Italianate row house right next to a cheap A-frame, next to a Victorian mansion, next to a Chicago courtyard building, surrounded by Great Lakes double-deckers and duplexes. It's a pretty bizarre place, though not much was built after the Great Depression except in the outermost neighborhoods and suburbs (but even some of Toledo's suburbs had stagnated by 1970). The Great Depression was most extreme in Toledo, and it never fully regained its glory except for a brief period after the St. Lawrence Seaway opened. The city overall fits in well with other Great Lakes cities, but its growth period was pretty short and pronounced (mainly 1880-1930). It largely lacks the late-stage urbanism of other Great Lakes and Northeastern cities (it's also missing some of the Civil War era stuff, but that can be found in Maumee and Perrysburg). Nowadays, Toledo looks very old and very rundown. It reminds me of Buffalo in the sense that urban developments in the post-WW2 era largely failed. I guess it's fitting since Toledo (and Duluth) killed Buffalo's grain business. Cleveland, Milwaukee, and even Detroit had more success with late-stage urbanism.

 

Toledo developed quickly post-Civil War, and then the urban core hit a wall by 1930. By contrast, Baltimore had quite a bit longer run in the sun. It started growing earlier and this growth continued a lot longer, hence why it's in better shape than core Rust Belt cities. In a lot of ways, Toledo was always stretching with its attempts to copy the Baltimore Inner Harbor, but I give the old city leaders credit for trying. Toledo did used to have a big corporate base that punched above its weight, so I think they thought they could escape the fate of their neighbors (obviously they were wrong...dead wrong).

 

Most of Toledo's Victorian and row housing gems are in first and second ring neighborhoods outside of the Downtown core. Its best mixed-use commercial buildings are in those neighborhoods too. There are even some whole blocks in Uptown, Old West End, Vistula, Lagrange, Old South End, and East Toledo that are abandoned, but secured in hopes of redevelopment. Even when a building is one of the last surviving landmarks on its block, it seems like the city is securing those properties the best it can. Toledo looks like it's now applying most of its preservation resources to core neighborhoods (within roughly 2-3 miles of Downtown). It is noticeably more surgical than what's happening in Detroit.

 

This is what I'm talking about. In impoverished East Toledo, you see the city trying to preserve blocks like this with a lot of potential:

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.6434747,-83.5165975,3a,75y,290.74h,89t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sG4U9ylop2qgC2kl1uIC5rg!2e0!5s20140801T000000!7i13312!8i6656

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.6434476,-83.5178755,3a,75y,304.69h,87.26t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sFcSFPekaZ7f_TCrogO6U2Q!2e0!5s20140801T000000!7i13312!8i6656

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.6446566,-83.5195541,3a,75y,44.47h,88.81t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1soXfJUdbi7n19vE8XsPYldQ!2e0!5s20140801T000000!7i13312!8i6656

 

East Toledo is way cheaper than Baltimore (I've seen buildings on sale for $1), and it probably is much poorer than the worst of Baltimore. Yet, its crime, while bad, doesn't approach the levels seen in Baltimore's worst slums. I give Toledo credit for trying to secure its surviving mixed use buildings and best housing. Some of these buildings have been abandoned for decades now, and the last recession really hurt their prospects since Toledo got hit so incredibly hard with Detroit. Whoever ends up buying these will do it out of a labor of love before there is much profit potential. East Toledo was never a wealthy neighborhood, but it's still overall more intact than its extreme economic despair would suggest. I think this supports my theory of the city trying to save stuff closest to downtown.

 

Some of this focus on core neighborhoods is obviously coming at the expense of third ring neighborhoods further out. West-Central Toledo, which is historic but cheaper architecture (that might be what you're talking about) has been getting decimated. On my last visit, I noticed whole residential blocks of homes that disappeared since the recession. Most of these houses were cheap wood-frame single family homes (with duplexes and double-deckers mixed in randomly). Some of these blocks are urban prairies now. Still, even on the main spines in West-Central Toledo, I was surprised to see how many abandoned commercial buildings were still standing. Some of that old streetcar route on Nebraska Avenue has potential. Arsons have long been the biggest issue in Toledo, and when multiple ones happen in the same night, the TFD has to be surgical on what to save. This is sort of historic preservation taken to its most extreme from, but the fire department looks like it has been making smart decisions.

 

*There is only so much the overworked fire department can do to preserve the city, and I think it's easiest to get to urban core fires in order to save buildings. Luckily, those are also the best buildings in Toledo. Toledo has roughly a 25-square mile urban core area that still has real potential. It helps big time that there aren't many freeways in this area, so it could be contiguous with infill. Toledo was really smart to push its freeways further out from the core so as to not snuff the downtown or waterfront. It's the neighborhoods beyond that core that are hard to see coming back since they never had the 10,000-30,000 person per square mile density of Old Toledo neighborhoods. They're not as appealing to young single people. Toledo has a few old streetcar suburbs with potential, but I envision the core coming back, surrounded by a dead zone, and then a few surviving streetcar suburbs that may or may not be stagnant. It's going to take on a weird form. I imagine the same thing happening in Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and even Pittsburgh. The core Rust Belt cities might already have lost too many buildings to be truly contiguous in the future absent massive population growth and investment. They're going to have pockets of dead zones. :|

 

The big difference with a city like Baltimore is that its economy is light years stronger than Toledo or any real hardcore Rust Belt city (Detroit and Toledo being arguably the most extreme examples, but this also applies to Cleveland and Buffalo). It also was built denser than any city in the Midwest (even most of Chicago). Baltimore is overall seeing population growth. While under built, it also has a functioning mass transit system. It's not hard to envision it going back to its peak population again. A lot of pieces are in place for Baltimore to boom. A lot of that row housing is higher quality than in Brooklyn. Mixed-use buildings are top notch as well. The new infill also looks good, leading me to believe significant amounts of money are being poured into Baltimore. Baltimore might have the most historic landmarks (percentage-wise) of any American city. Why are we letting large chunks of one of the nation's oldest cities get leveled? That's really disturbing and disheartening to see for anybody interested in historic preservation in any city. If it can happen in Baltimore, it can happen anywhere...

 

So the big question is, who wins from these demolitions? What demolition contractors are being awarded these bids? How is this kind of crap still happening in 2010's America when urban demand from young people is through the roof?

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Sorry to take this a little off-topic, but Toledo has long had an obsession with Baltimore due to their major shipping and industrial legacies. Do other Ohio cities study Baltimore? Below is a good article from the Toledo Blade detailing Baltimore's issues. This article is from before the Freddie Gray riots, and it doesn't discuss these big demolition plans. It takes a more positive tone. It think it's critical for Ohio cities to pay attention to Baltimore. Toledo may have failed to copy the Inner Harbor, but it still has an eye on the most Rust Belt of East Coast cities. The 2015 riots took Baltimore down a little, but in no way is it out:

 

Baltimore’s fight against blight could offer guidance to Toledo

BY JANET ROMAKER

BLADE STAFF WRITER

Published: Sunday, 6/29/2014 - Updated: 1 year ago

 

BALTIMORE — Death threats did not deter Earl Johnson.

 

“Those threats just strengthened my resolve to make changes. I wasn’t scared of getting my head cut off or shot off, but I was scared of something happening to my wife. If something had happened to her because I didn’‍t get involved, I couldn’t have lived with myself,” Mr. Johnson said.

 

He stepped up and then got down and dirty. Hundreds of others in Baltimore did the same.

 

Weary of worrisome dangers and destruction, the take-back-Baltimore movement has helped heal sections of the city wounded by caustic conditions. Blight was kicked to the curb in the Oliver neighborhood in particular. Call it a modern-day Oliver twist.

 

In 2010, Oliver was a pitiful place. Plywood, not glass, covered windows of most homes. Vacant and abandoned, the blighted neighborhood was a filming location for the Baltimore-based HBO drama The Wire.

 

...Row houses, renovated inside and out, have been purchased by people who want to live here. Residents walk their dogs at dusk. Neighbors sit on front porches. They mingle. They watch out for each other.

 

As in other communities across the country, including Toledo, the blight problem was years in the making. Fixing it? It’‍s not like making Minute Rice or cooking a pot of instant oatmeal or scratching with a coin at a lottery ticket.

 

FULL ARTICLE (Long and in-depth)

http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2014/06/29/Baltimore-s-fight-against-blight-could-offer-guidance-to-Toledo.html#7cFBhlcWTQeHshLd.99

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Baltimore is by far the top destination for people moving out of D.C.

Nov 29, 2016, 7:25am EST

Andy Medici

Staff Reporter Washington Business Journal

 

Every year, tens of thousands of people pack up and leave Greater Washington for opportunities elsewhere.

 

In fact, about 18,000 more people leave the D.C. metro area than move in every year, according to data from lawn care service LawnStarter.

 

...The figures found that an average of 23,676 people move from D.C. annually to Baltimore, a far and away leader compared with 9,979 moving to Richmond, Va.

 

MORE:

http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/news/2016/11/29/baltimore-is-by-far-the-top-destination-for-people.html


"Save the planet. Move to the city." -- The Downtowner podcast

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Baltimore is by far the top destination for people moving out of D.C.

Nov 29, 2016, 7:25am EST

Andy Medici

Staff Reporter Washington Business Journal

 

Every year, tens of thousands of people pack up and leave Greater Washington for opportunities elsewhere.

 

In fact, about 18,000 more people leave the D.C. metro area than move in every year, according to data from lawn care service LawnStarter.

 

...The figures found that an average of 23,676 people move from D.C. annually to Baltimore, a far and away leader compared with 9,979 moving to Richmond, Va.

 

MORE:

http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/news/2016/11/29/baltimore-is-by-far-the-top-destination-for-people.html

 

Most of those people probably aren't moving out. The DC metro grows at 3x the rate of the Baltimore metro. DC has been sprawling into Baltimore for decades. I'd bet those people who have "moved into" the Baltimore area are in DC metro adjacent Anne Arundel and Howard Counties and still work in the DC area. Probably consider themselves DC people as well.

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