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Some of you are acting/talking like the hyperloop competes with trains.  Though this is better than Angie Schmitt, who tweeted that it competes with buses.

 

Actually, it competes with planes. Looks like it will end up taking a lot less space than an airport too.  So it can go downtown, or close.

 

Let's say it's feasible, I'm not a CivE or MechE so I can't say that for sure (but betting against Musk seems to be contraindicated), but what does it mean for Cleveland if it happens here first.

 

-We gain an instant reputation as being on the technological cutting edge.

 

-We establish ties with Chicago well in excess of any other city in the region. 

 

 

 

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In the meantime we are spending real dollars to study the feasibility of a fictional mode of transportation.  Angie's point is that $200,000 could be better spent to improve bus systems in cities.  I agree with her on this. 

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In the meantime we are spending real dollars to study the feasibility of a fictional mode of transportation.  Angie's point is that $200,000 could be better spent to improve bus systems in cities.  I agree with her on this. 

 

What is $200 grand going to to?  A single diesel bus costs half again that.

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Actually, it competes with planes. Looks like it will end up taking a lot less space than an airport too.  So it can go downtown, or close.

 

Well if they build the thing above-ground, it certainly takes up more physical space than airports.  Which is why it has to be completely underground.  Which is reason #97 why it will never be built. 

 

I heard some chatter recently about the cost to bore a continuous tunnel from Washington, DC to NYC.  They estimated something like $20 billion.  yeah if this thing is going be 48" diameter and you'll lay on your back or stomach in the pods maybe they can build it for that price.  If you want to sit upright, be prepared to pay triple. 

 

 

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In the meantime we are spending real dollars to study the feasibility of a fictional mode of transportation.  Angie's point is that $200,000 could be better spent to improve bus systems in cities.  I agree with her on this. 

 

What is $200 grand going to to?  A single diesel bus costs half again that.

 

Traffic signal improvements and road improvements for a problem that exists right now.  Or to pay for a study of a fictional mode of transportation. 

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Actually, it competes with planes. Looks like it will end up taking a lot less space than an airport too.  So it can go downtown, or close.

 

Well if they build the thing above-ground, it certainly takes up more physical space than airports.  Which is why it has to be completely underground.  Which is reason #97 why it will never be built. 

 

I heard some chatter recently about the cost to bore a continuous tunnel from Washington, DC to NYC.  They estimated something like $20 billion.  yeah if this thing is going be 48" diameter and you'll lay on your back or stomach in the pods maybe they can build it for that price.  If you want to sit upright, be prepared to pay triple.

 

Meanwhile, maglev trains that can travel 300MPH already exist.  But yeah let's look into this fictional mode of transportation instead.

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In the meantime we are spending real dollars to study the feasibility of a fictional mode of transportation.  Angie's point is that $200,000 could be better spent to improve bus systems in cities.  I agree with her on this. 

 

What is $200 grand going to to?  A single diesel bus costs half again that.

 

Traffic signal improvements and road improvements for a problem that exists right now.  Or to pay for a study of a fictional mode of transportation. 

 

Again, that cost would be eaten up quickly (largely by bureacracy) and not last long.  Versus a potential game changer.

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  Versus a potential game changer.[/color]

 

 

It's never going to exist.  It is physically unfeasible and it's more expensive to build with fewer revenue streams than rail.  This is all just a publicity stunt for Musk Brands. 

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dumbasses. 

 

Is this the direction the forum is going?  If so, can we at least be creative (without getting a time out that is?) 

 

I think so.  I got called "f*cking nuts" yesterday for stating that Twinsburg is a suburb of Cleveland.

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dumbasses. 

 

Is this the direction the forum is going?  If so, can we at least be creative (without getting a time out that is?) 

 

I think so.  I got called "f*cking nuts" yesterday for stating that Twinsburg is a suburb of Cleveland.

 

Probably by someone from the 'Burg itself LOL.  Contentious bunch.  I'm in the main town discussion group and the mods have their hands full.  (My brother went to Chamberlain as did several of our best friends).

 

But of course it is.  It's also a suburb of Akron.

 

I've called that area (Twinsburg, the Nordonia towns, Richfield, even Hinckley) the "Borderlands" around here before,  because that's pretty much what they are. 

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What would the failure modes look like on these things? Would there be a “push pod” traveling at a slower speed that goes out and forces the travel pods forward if the vacuum seal failed in the tube? Would passengers have to wait for it to travel 200 miles to arrive and start pushing? What if more than one pod was stuck in a tube? What do the oxygen systems look like for the pods since they will be traveling through a vaccuum? What would happen if they failed?


www.cincinnatiideas.com

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What would the failure modes look like on these things? Would there be a “push pod” traveling at a slower speed that goes out and forces the travel pods forward if the vacuum seal failed in the tube? Would passengers have to wait for it to travel 200 miles to arrive and start pushing? What if more than one pod was stuck in a tube? What do the oxygen systems look like for the pods since they will be traveling through a vaccuum? What would happen if they failed?

 

I'm sure they aren't sharing all the technical details with the general public.

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So back to Hyperlooptt news...

 

Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, NOACA, announce partners in $1.2 million study of Cleveland-Chicago route

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Hyperloop Transportation Technologies and the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency on Monday announced the names of 18 businesses and nonprofit or academic organizations that have joined their partnership to explore a potential Great Lakes Hyperloop link between Cleveland and Chicago. The list includes: Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems, Corp., Ohio State University, ZIN Technologies, Ohio Aerospace Institute, Jobs Ohio, America Makes, Oak Ridge National Labs, Ohio Aerospace and Aviation Council, Ohio Aerospace and Aviation Technology Committee, Wright State Research Institute, The Gateway Group, Additive Engineering Solutions, Eureka Ranch, The University of Akron, The University of Akron Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati SpaceX Hyperloop Competition Team, The Greater Akron Chamber, and the City of Akron.

 

http://www.cleveland.com/architecture/index.ssf/2018/02/hyperloop_transportation_techn.html

 

 

 

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One of the reasons this Hyperloop company selected Cleveland was the manufacturing knowhow of the region.

Even if Hyperloop does not come to Cleveland, Cleveland companies may get a leg up on competition for fabrication technology of the tube, which is essentially a pipeline

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One of the reasons this Hyperloop company selected Cleveland was the manufacturing knowhow of the region.

Even if Hyperloop does not come to Cleveland, Cleveland companies may get a leg up on competition for fabrication technology of the tube, which is essentially a pipeline

 

Like a water cannon is a squirtgun LOL.

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^ it's 1.2 million in wasted money not just $200K.  Oy vey,

 

That's all contributors, so perhaps NOACA put up $200,000 that got matched 5-1.

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One of the reasons this Hyperloop company selected Cleveland was the manufacturing knowhow of the region.

Even if Hyperloop does not come to Cleveland, Cleveland companies may get a leg up on competition for fabrication technology of the tube, which is essentially a pipeline

 

Like a water cannon is a squirtgun LOL.

I’ve done some casual consulting with Hyperloop One.  The best way to fabricate the tube, and the required quality of welding in order to maintain the vacuum, with the stress and fatigue of running a rail system within it, is a technical, logistical and cost challenge

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You could take a bunch of high speed rail literature from over the years, put a "hyperloop" logo and diagrams on half of it, and split the materials between two groups.  The tech bros would love the "hyyperloop" stuff and hate the rail stuff, even though it's all the same stuff.  Even after you pull back the curtain, they'd still love the hyperloop and hate rail.   

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casual consulting with Hyperloop One.  The best way to fabricate the tube, and the required quality of welding in order to maintain the vacuum, with the stress and fatigue of running a rail system within it, is a technical, logistical and cost challenge

 

Yeah why not just only build the rail system and save a few dozen billion dollars and get all of the passengers you would have otherwise. 

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casual consulting with Hyperloop One.  The best way to fabricate the tube, and the required quality of welding in order to maintain the vacuum, with the stress and fatigue of running a rail system within it, is a technical, logistical and cost challenge

 

Yeah why not just only build the rail system and save a few dozen billion dollars and get all of the passengers you would have otherwise.

 

That may be a silver lining, that this is the inevitable conclusion once we see the numbers.

 

I’m getting a lot of texts and emails about the loop from people who normally have no interest in transit. So at least this thing is showing there are desired solutions beyond simply building more lanes of highway.

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It’s unclear to me if they’ve established the feasibility of bifurcation of the tube yet. With so many of the technical details (and thus economics) unknown, isn’t drawing lines on maps (outside of the blogosphere) a pointless exercise?


www.cincinnatiideas.com

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One of the reasons this Hyperloop company selected Cleveland was the manufacturing knowhow of the region.

Even if Hyperloop does not come to Cleveland, Cleveland companies may get a leg up on competition for fabrication technology of the tube, which is essentially a pipeline

 

Like a water cannon is a squirtgun LOL.

I’ve done some casual consulting with Hyperloop One.  The best way to fabricate the tube, and the required quality of welding in order to maintain the vacuum, with the stress and fatigue of running a rail system within it, is a technical, logistical and cost challenge

 

My degree’s in metallurgical engineering so yeah, I know this.  That’s part of why it’s such an exciting concept.  Even if it doesn’t quite come to pass, it’s liable to generate more spinoffs than an icy freeway in the south.

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It’s unclear to me if they’ve established the feasibility of bifurcation of the tube yet. With so many of the technical details (and thus economics) unknown, isn’t drawing lines on maps (outside of the blogosphere) a pointless exercise?

 

Also, I recall reading quite awhile ago that Maglev has never taken off because the increased speed does not actually increase capacity because they must leave much larger gaps between trains traveling in the same direction.  What sort of gaps will be required between pods in the hyperloop tube to permit safe operation?  If that space is so vast that they can only shoot one 30-man pod at a time between City A and City B, why are we even having this conversation?  It's possible that the per-hour ridership of the hyperloop is a fraction of the per-hour ridership of HSR?

 

HSR lines are designed for 12-15 trains per hour, peak, per direction.  That's like 10,000+ people per hour in each direction.  Not sure how the hyperloop possibly competes with this.  They would need to fire off 300+ 30-man pods per hour per direction to match that capacity.  That's one every 10~ seconds. 

 

 

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Some of you are acting/talking like the hyperloop competes with trains.  Though this is better than Angie Schmitt, who tweeted that it competes with buses.

 

The point Angie made is that the hyperloop competes against buses when it comes to political attention. She wasn't talking about riders. It's easier for Midwestern politicians to say they support bold new ideas like the hyperloop than to actually implement transit solutions that already exist today. Columbus is doing it with their "smart cities" initiatives, and Cincinnati is doing it with our Uber-Metro partnership. We could start making improvements to our transit systems tomorrow, implementing ideas that have already been proven to work in hundreds of cities around the world. But instead we don't do anything, and hope that hyperloops and self-driving cars and Big Data will solve our transportation problems.

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Exciting stuff!

 

Hmmm......bet I can guess where that Sandusky stop is.

 

You'd be able to pre-emptively lose your lunch on the Hyperloop so that you don't have to worry about accidentally puking on someone while riding the Raptor.


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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Some of you are acting/talking like the hyperloop competes with trains.  Though this is better than Angie Schmitt, who tweeted that it competes with buses.

 

The point Angie made is that the hyperloop competes against buses when it comes to political attention. She wasn't talking about riders. It's easier for Midwestern politicians to say they support bold new ideas like the hyperloop than to actually implement transit solutions that already exist today. Columbus is doing it with their "smart cities" initiatives, and Cincinnati is doing it with our Uber-Metro partnership. We could start making improvements to our transit systems tomorrow, implementing ideas that have already been proven to work in hundreds of cities around the world. But instead we don't do anything, and hope that hyperloops and self-driving cars and Big Data will solve our transportation problems.

 

She's wrong, as usual.  The dearth of leadership since White (perhaps even since Voinovich) means that reaching for breakthrough ideas may be what is needed to revitalize the city and region.

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Some of you are acting/talking like the hyperloop competes with trains.  Though this is better than Angie Schmitt, who tweeted that it competes with buses.

 

The point Angie made is that the hyperloop competes against buses when it comes to political attention. She wasn't talking about riders. It's easier for Midwestern politicians to say they support bold new ideas like the hyperloop than to actually implement transit solutions that already exist today. Columbus is doing it with their "smart cities" initiatives, and Cincinnati is doing it with our Uber-Metro partnership. We could start making improvements to our transit systems tomorrow, implementing ideas that have already been proven to work in hundreds of cities around the world. But instead we don't do anything, and hope that hyperloops and self-driving cars and Big Data will solve our transportation problems.

 

She's wrong, as usual.  The dearth of leadership since White (perhaps even since Voinovich) means that reaching for breakthrough ideas may be what is needed to revitalize the city and region.

 

I think Cleveland's problem has been that they are always searching for a silver bullet instead of doing proven things.  Angie is spot on this time.

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I think Cleveland's problem has been that they are always searching for a silver bullet instead of doing proven things.  Angie is spot on this time.

 

I often hear Cleveland leaders say -- why don't you ever lobby us to build an multimodal transportation center or rebuild the existing rail system? I've wanted to reply -- do we really have to encourage you to breath or eat?


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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Just to sum - if a hypothetical headline said:

 

"High speed rail being explored to connect Chicago and Cleveland"

 

If its Amtrak - good?

If its Hyperloop - bad?

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Some of you are acting/talking like the hyperloop competes with trains.  Though this is better than Angie Schmitt, who tweeted that it competes with buses.

 

The point Angie made is that the hyperloop competes against buses when it comes to political attention. She wasn't talking about riders. It's easier for Midwestern politicians to say they support bold new ideas like the hyperloop than to actually implement transit solutions that already exist today. Columbus is doing it with their "smart cities" initiatives, and Cincinnati is doing it with our Uber-Metro partnership. We could start making improvements to our transit systems tomorrow, implementing ideas that have already been proven to work in hundreds of cities around the world. But instead we don't do anything, and hope that hyperloops and self-driving cars and Big Data will solve our transportation problems.

 

She's wrong, as usual.  The dearth of leadership since White (perhaps even since Voinovich) means that reaching for breakthrough ideas may be what is needed to revitalize the city and region.

 

I think Cleveland's problem has been that they are always searching for a silver bullet instead of doing proven things.  Angie is spot on this time.

 

I agree with Erocc here.  What if this is the next big thing in technology and transportation?  I could only imagine the public backlash if Cleveland leaders did nothing and this turned out to be a smashing success for other cities around the country and world.  1.2mil is nothing when compared to RTA's overall needs and budget.  Think big or go home. 

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