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Wow, no thread for the CVNP??

 

Cuyahoga Valley National Park was 11th most-visited national park in 2014

By CRAIN'S CLEVELAND BUSINESS

Originally Published: March 03, 2015 10:03 AM  Modified: March 03, 2015 11:38 PM

 

Cuyahoga Valley National Park was the 11th most-visited national park in the United States last year, according to data released by the National Park Service.

 

The park, stretching across 33,000 acres along the Cuyahoga River between Cleveland and Akron, drew 2,189,849 visits in 2014, up 3.8% from 2,109,010 visits in 2013. (The park does not charge an entrance fee and therefore does not have formal entrance stations. Visitation is determined by counters placed at trailhead parking lots.)

 

“We are pleased to be ranked among the treasures of the National Park System like Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks,” said Craig Kenkel, superintendent of Cuyahoga Valley National Park, in a statement.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150303/FREE/150309959/cuyahoga-valley-national-park-was-11th-most-visited-national-park-in


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Cuyahoga Valley National Park gets love at the top of this global tour by NatGeo of great urban parks. Of course, I love the CVNP for the CVSR -- Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad which carries more people than Amtrak's nocturnal Ohio services statewide...

 

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/04/nature-urban-national-parks/


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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From the Akron Beacon Journal:

 

Fundraising for new visitor center in Cuyahoga Valley has collected $3.8 million for $5.96 million facility

 

The Cuyahoga Valley National Park wants to open its first full-service visitor center to help the millions of park visitors, especially those from other states and countries, find their way around the popular destination and the entire region.

The effort is being driven by a nearly $6 million fundraising campaign by the Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park, the friends-of-the-park group.

 

That fundraising campaign — the biggest ever undertaken by the nonprofit grass-roots group — has quietly raised $3.8 million or nearly 64 percent for the welcome gateway in northern Summit County. Officials are optimistic that the remaining $2.1 million will be donated by Dec. 31.

 

If the money is raised, design plans for the three-building complex off Riverview Road in Boston Township would be prepared in 2017 and construction would begin in 2018. The new visitor center would open in late 2018 or early 2019.

 

The Cuyahoga Valley park has never had a full-service visitor center, and that’s been a desire for many years.

 

http://www.ohio.com/news/local/fundraising-for-new-visitor-center-in-cuyahoga-valley-has-collected-3-8-million-for-5-96-million-facility-1.678020

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Are there still plans to extend the scenic railway? Or has that been scrapped

 

Hasn't been scrapped, but isn't an active plan either.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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BTW, does the PD know the national park even exists??

 

Cuyahoga Valley National Park plans new visitor center

By The Associated Press

POSTED: 12/23/16, 9:42 AM EST | UPDATED: 2 HRS AGO 0

 

BRECKSVILLE >> A nonprofit group has announced plans for a new $5.9 million visitor center at a national park in northeast Ohio.

 

The Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park says it has already raised more than $4.6 million for the project.

 

The new center would replace the current one located in a historic 1836 building that the group says is too small and isn’t located on park grounds, but in the village of Boston, Ohio.

 

MORE:

http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20161223/cuyahoga-valley-national-park-plans-new-visitor-center


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Glad to see it. The Beacon Journal does a much better job of covering the park than the PD.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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I'd say 2-3 days. But you could spend one whole day biking the trail in the warmer months or skiing in the winter months. You could spend half the day on the CVSR train, riding one way with your bicycle and biking in the other direction. There's several B&B's in the middle part of the park, from Peninsula north to Boston Heights near Boston Mills Ski resort. And there's a Marriott hotel next to the CVSR Akron Northside station. One of the best pizza restaurants in NE Ohio is right there too -- Luigi's. Hale Farm & Village is worth a couple of hours, as are the shops in downtown Peninsula. Brandywine Falls is up the hill from Boston Mills, with a B&B next to it. Plus there's lots of natural habitats and historic remnants of the canal to see along the trail.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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No. I don't fish.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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A little throwback to warmer weather, and checking off some more of the parks trails and waterfalls this past summer and fall

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The wife and I hit waterfall #8 today out of the 9 in CVNP. Only one left to go! 

 

This one was Greenwood Falls, and was by far the most demanding hike once you're off the towpath, but it was worth it - probably my 2nd favorite in the park after Twin Sister Falls. 

 

(My apologies if there's any profanity in the video haha) 

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I don't know if this is the right thread for this (BM/BW or NEO skiing?), but the owner of Northeast Ohio's three ski resorts (Boston Mills, Brandywine & Alpine Valley) Peak Resorts, has been bought out by Vail Resorts. Vail Resorts is one of the largest operators/owners of ski resorts in the US, owning Vail, Breck, Stowe, Whistler and Park City among other well-known mountains.

 

The conglomeration has acquired a few other eastern resorts within NEOs Alpine Valleys and BM/BW size range, but mostly focuses on larger resorts where they can undertake real estate developments (a major aspect of their business model). The whole ski industry has been heading towards consolidation, worrying many patrons of local mountains about the effects management from an outside entity. Numerous resorts have however received notable capital investments once under the management of these larger corporations, usually in the form of upgraded lifts and snow making capacity. They claim this will be to the tune of $15 million over the next two years at former Peak Resorts. My guess is that most of this will go towards the larger resorts in Peak’s portfolio further East, skipping their four new Ohio resorts.

 

Peak Resorts has done aright job with BM/BW since they’ve been under their control for the past 15+ seasons, however many were upset with Purdue Pharma’s Sackler family (OxyContin patent holders) recently becoming majority owners.  

 

This acquisition will however be most beneficial to Northeast Ohio’s most avid skiers as it ropes them into their “Epic Pass” system. In its various forms it essentially serves as a season pass for all resorts under Vail ownership/management, meaning that an Epic pass you buy for Ohio of Pennsylvania skiing can get you into Whistler or Mount Snow. Vail Resorts now essentially funnels Northeast or Midwest skiers from local resorts to their larger mountains. If you ski locally, but also spend over 3 days a season on larger mountains further east or out west, this is great news.

 

TL;DR – Larger ski resort conglomerate (Vail) acquires smaller ski resort conglomerate (Peak), owner of Boston Mills, Brandywine and Alpine Valley. Large local capital investments are unlikely. New passes available for regions skiers who vacation at larger mountains.

 

http://news.vailresorts.com/corporate/peakresorts.htm

Edited by NorthShore647
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^ great write-up and interesting news -- thanks ---  i did not know all three ski areas were owned by the same company. 

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Cuyahoga Valley National Park Opening Boston Mill Visitor Center

 

https://wcpn.ideastream.org/news/cuyahoga-valley-national-park-opening-boston-mill-visitor-center

 

“After 10 years and more than $7 million, the Cuyahoga Valley National Park finally has a “front door.”

 

“The new Boston Mill Visitor Center sits along the Cuyahoga River, the Ohio & Erie Canal and Towpath Trail, and the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad in Peninsula. It opens to the public at 10 a.m. on Friday, with grand opening activities continuing through the weekend.”

 

 

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Cuyahoga Valley National Park’s Stanford Campsites close permanently, effective Nov. 1

Link: https://www.cleveland.com/akron/2019/11/cuyahoga-valley-national-parks-stanford-campsites-close-permanently-effective-nov-1.html

 

"Opened in 2008, the campsites were intended to be temporary until a permanent site could be established. Camping had been permitted through a commercial use authorization, however the park found that the authorization was not in keeping with the National Parks Service policy, and resources had been damaged as a result."

 

These were 5 "primitive" campsites just east of Stanford House along the Stanford trail. There wasn't much more than areas of cut grass in the field, each with a picnic table. These five spots were however the only place you could camp overnight in the national park. When or if the NPS creates new campsites in the park i think something close to Sanford or Boston would be an ideal location (this spot was one of the more remote spots you could get in CVNP). I believe the now closet public primitive campsite to Cleveland is at Punderson. 

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On 11/2/2019 at 5:10 PM, NorthShore647 said:

Cuyahoga Valley National Park’s Stanford Campsites close permanently, effective Nov. 1

Link: https://www.cleveland.com/akron/2019/11/cuyahoga-valley-national-parks-stanford-campsites-close-permanently-effective-nov-1.html

 

"Opened in 2008, the campsites were intended to be temporary until a permanent site could be established. Camping had been permitted through a commercial use authorization, however the park found that the authorization was not in keeping with the National Parks Service policy, and resources had been damaged as a result."

 

These were 5 "primitive" campsites just east of Stanford House along the Stanford trail. There wasn't much more than areas of cut grass in the field, each with a picnic table. These five spots were however the only place you could camp overnight in the national park. When or if the NPS creates new campsites in the park i think something close to Sanford or Boston would be an ideal location (this spot was one of the more remote spots you could get in CVNP). I believe the now closet public primitive campsite to Cleveland is at Punderson. 

 

The Towpath is a great way to get scouts and other youth out on foot or on their bikes in the  national park, but it is very difficult to find campsites anywhere nearby (even outside of the park).  I would really like to see that change!

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Cuyahoga Valley National Park closes section of Towpath Trail in Cuyahoga County through Feb. 21 (between Station Road Bridge Trailhead in Brecksville and Frazee House in Valley View)

 

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2020/02/cuyahoga-valley-national-park-closes-section-of-towpath-trail-in-cuyahoga-county-through-feb-21.html

 

BRECKSVILLE, Ohio – Cuyahoga Valley National Park on Monday temporarily closed a section of the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail, between Station Road Bridge Trailhead in Brecksville and Frazee House in Valley View, for canal dredging.

The three-mile section of trail will be closed through Feb. 21, and no detour is available, the National Park Service said in a news release.

 

[Caption: A section of the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail (turquoise line), between Station Road Bridge Trailhead in Brecksville and Frazee House in Valley View, will be closed through Feb. 21 for canal dredging. (National Park Service)]

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On 2/10/2020 at 9:18 AM, Boomerang_Brian said:

Cuyahoga Valley National Park closes section of Towpath Trail in Cuyahoga County through Feb. 21 (between Station Road Bridge Trailhead in Brecksville and Frazee House in Valley View)

 

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2020/02/cuyahoga-valley-national-park-closes-section-of-towpath-trail-in-cuyahoga-county-through-feb-21.html

 

BRECKSVILLE, Ohio – Cuyahoga Valley National Park on Monday temporarily closed a section of the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail, between Station Road Bridge Trailhead in Brecksville and Frazee House in Valley View, for canal dredging.

The three-mile section of trail will be closed through Feb. 21, and no detour is available, the National Park Service said in a news release.

 

[Caption: A section of the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail (turquoise line), between Station Road Bridge Trailhead in Brecksville and Frazee House in Valley View, will be closed through Feb. 21 for canal dredging. (National Park Service)]

 

 

 

 

 

Pardon my lack of hydrology expertise, but is why is dredging necessary if the canal is no longer used? 

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5 hours ago, Cleburger said:

 

Pardon my lack of hydrology expertise, but is why is dredging necessary if the canal is no longer used? 

Yeah, I was wondering the same thing. The article says it is to clean up sediment and prepare for the removal of the Brecksville dam. I don’t know why the latter would require the former, but it’ll certainly be nice if the canal is cleaner. 

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7 hours ago, Cleburger said:

 

Pardon my lack of hydrology expertise, but is why is dredging necessary if the canal is no longer used? 


Im not an expert either, but I frequent the park.

 

Last year a ranger told me stagnant water in the canal is an issue they have to address, so I wonder if dredging will promote water flow?

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That would make sense.  The purpose of the Bville dam was diversion of the river to the canal.  My understanding is they will be adding a pump to move water to the canal. Since that flow isn’t all that great at the moment they probably felt a need, with the likely lower amount of water going into the canal, that it probably is a good time to address that as well. 

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The dam was only built in the 1950s to divert water into the canal which was being used to feed into the steel plants downstream. I'm interested in why that was done at that point versus further downstream in Cleveland itself.

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^My understanding is that it was to insure that there was plenty of water going through the summer and droughts.  The canal is also getting water from various sources and tributaries.  There are overflows out of the canal to the river when those points fill with too much water.   I imagine it was engineers that decided ‘we always need x amount of water so lets go ahead and divert x amount of water’

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CVNP Facebook post: “When the idea of removing the Brecksville Dam was proposed in 1989, it seemed like a farfetched dream. Canal engineers first dammed the Cuyahoga at the Pinery Narrows in 1827. For nearly 200 years the river has not flowed freely below Akron. Today decades of planning by many partners was realized. An excavator reached its long mechanical arm into the tumbling waters and, over several hours, jackhammered a notch into the concrete dam. By tomorrow the water level will drop and our national heritage river will begin a new chapter.”

 

 

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