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Guest Gramarye

Red or Blue: Who donates to better charities?

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I'd almost want my money directed towards fostering some alleged cycle of dependency, than for it to help pay for Joel Osteen's $10.5 million mansion, or Benny Hinn's $10 million seaside estate, or one of Ken Copeland's private jets and private airport, or Paula and Randy White's multi-million dollar condo in the Trump Tower

 

http://www.inplainsite.org/html/tele-evangelist_lifestyles.html

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And then we could have competing charities, as other donate to organizations that you may not like. Which results in no unified approach to public problems and less efficient use of money, as one donation tries to undo another.

 

Instead, with a government role, we have a public policy for a public problem -- a policy crafted through a public process and hammered out by people with varying viewpoints.

 

Competing charities is a good thing. The ones that are most effective will summon the most investment.

 

I'd rather not see a unified approach, but rather a competition of ideas to see which approaches work. This creates variable options for those requiring help who may need a more tailored vs. unified approach to their problems.

 

The problem with a government solution to any problem is that government, in so many regards, is set up to be slow and burdensome. We've so often seen the government process can be mired in politics, hostile to innovation and reluctant to adapt.

 

Not saying you won't see these negative attributes in the private sector; just that when those issues do arise they're easier to fix.

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^is someone forcing you to pay for their lifestyles? If anyone is considering a particular charity then investigate it through a charity watchdog organization to see where the money goes. It's not brain surgery.

 

As long as there's transparency it could work. I'm thinking of Consumer Reports, and the like.

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^is someone forcing you to pay for their lifestyles? If anyone is considering a particular charity then investigate it through a charity watchdog organization to see where the money goes. It's not brain surgery.

 

As long as there's transparency it could work. I'm thinking of Consumer Reports, and the like.

What would really be nice is to see a little transparency and accountability from the multi-billion dollar government "social service" organizations with their thousands of six-figure salaried bureaucrats who sit on their duffs all day formulating "policy" with no discernible results.

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The problem with a government solution to any problem is that government, in so many regards, is set up to be slow and burdensome. We've so often seen the government process can be mired in politics, hostile to innovation and reluctant to adapt.

 

And permanent.  Indeed, eternally growing as the bureacracy expands to meet the needs of the expanding bureaucracy.

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Call me a cynic, but I think that there may be a tax dodging aspect to this phenomenon, and perhaps even a stretch of the word "charity," but that's not even my biggest concern.  What concerns me is that many righties often imply that some sort of a widespread charity network could legitimately take on the many roles of what the government currently does in providing a social safety net.  Even if that were logistically feasible, which I think is highly unlikely, more concerning is what you mentioned in the above post (but that I accidentally deleted when quoting) that many folks tend to give to those that are somehow familiar. 

 

Is it crazy to think that private entities could cut out much of the bureaucracy and spend money more wisely than the government?

 

Private charities would be under strict scrutiny, and we could all donate money to the ones that are the most responsible and effective. 

 

No, what seems like a stretch to me is the idea that this charity network would get enough money through volunteer donations to replicate the amount that is provided by the government.  And again, that's assuming that there wouldn't be a "I'm not giving to those people" factor, which we all know would be a big influence in how much and where people directed their donations.

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What would really be nice is to see a little transparency and accountability from the multi-billion dollar government "social service" organizations with their thousands of six-figure salaried bureaucrats who sit on their duffs all day formulating "policy" with no discernible results.

 

What did you have in mind?  Perhaps a law which makes all of their records, communications, intra-office memos, and the like available for public inspection upon request?  How about a law which requires that meetings be made open to the public?  Perhaps some type of committee made up of citizens We The People elect to provide oversight on all these functions?  And, oh yeah, should we further create a system in which those oversight officials would have to be selected every few years by We The People?  That type of transparency and accountability?  Or did you have something else in mind?  Or maybe you were talking about private 'charities' which have none of the above?

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What would really be nice is to see a little transparency and accountability from the multi-billion dollar government "social service" organizations with their thousands of six-figure salaried bureaucrats who sit on their duffs all day formulating "policy" with no discernible results.

 

What did you have in mind?  Perhaps a law which makes all of their records, communications, intra-office memos, and the like available for public inspection upon request?  How about a law which requires that meetings be made open to the public?  Perhaps some type of committee made up of citizens We The People elect to provide oversight on all these functions?  And, oh yeah, should we further create a system in which those oversight officials would have to be selected every few years by We The People?  That type of transparency and accountability?  Or did you have something else in mind?  Or maybe you were talking about private 'charities' which have none of the above?

 

It's surprising that you really don't seem to care how efficiently your tax dollars are spent. Maybe the following organizations that monitor private charitable giving (and there are probably many others)--of which you were apparently unaware--can help educate you--(I don't know how we could most effectively ensure that government-funded bureaucracies which are ostensibly created to serve the people can be held accountable, but some of your obviously facetious suggestions sound like good ideas if they could seriously be implemented)--

 

http://www.charitywatch.org/index.html

 

http://www.charitynavigator.org/

 

http://www.ecfa.org/

 

http://greatnonprofits.org/

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What makes you assume that I don't seem to care how efficiently my tax dollars are spent?  You make a lot of assumptions, my man. 

 

Yes, I am well aware of private charity watchdog organizations.  I never said that I was not.  I was simply responding to your suggestion that there was not even the slightest bit of transparency and accountability for government programs.  To the contrary, in addition to private watchdog groups who monitor government spending and the press, we have congressional oversight committees, we have the Freedom of Information Act, we have Sunshine Laws, we have ethical laws, we have checks and balances.  Do private businesses have to share every email their CEOs send out?  Do private businesses have to publish their budgets line item by line item?  Please.... 

 

 

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hmmmph :wtf:...then there must be some other explanation why there's such a disconnect between the gobs of money that are poured into so many government programs and the dearth of positive results they were designed to produce. Maybe some day we'll find the answer to this mystery.

 

It's because they aren't designed to end, or really to fix any of the root causes.  It's like treating addiction solely with maintenance medication and ignoring the root causes.  We need to keep in mind that these programs produce a lot of jobs, and the people running them actually gain by having more reciplents rather than fewer.

 

Of course, this has led to a sense of entitlement which has grown into a sense of contempt.

 

As far as "angry mobs", they weren't a problem when government charity wasn't as pervasive.

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As far as "angry mobs", they weren't a problem when government charity wasn't as pervasive.[/color]

 

Of course not ... from http://www.ushistory.org

 

The Bonus March

 

Although the United States had little history of massive social upheaval or coup attempts against the government, hunger has an ominous way of stirring those passions among any population.  As bread riots and shantytowns grew in number, many began to seek alternatives to the status quo.  Demonstrations in the nation's capital increased, as Americans grew increasingly weary with President Hoover's perceived inaction.  The demonstration that drew the most national attention was the Bonus Army march of 1932.

 

MORE: http://www.ushistory.org/us/48c.asp

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Do you really think we're getting anywhere near that territory in the U.S. today?

 

ETA: Do you really think we'd even be getting anywhere near that territory in the U.S. today if we halved the spending of our welfare programs?

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^What do you consider to be a welfare program?

 

TANF, unemployment insurance payments, Section 8, food stamps, heating/phone/any other utility assistance, and any other income assistance programs intended to help the indigent by direct federal spending (whether to the individuals or to those providing them with goods and services, e.g., section 8 landlords).

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As far as "angry mobs", they weren't a problem when government charity wasn't as pervasive.[/color]

 

Of course not ... from http://www.ushistory.org

 

The Bonus March

 

Although the United States had little history of massive social upheaval or coup attempts against the government, hunger has an ominous way of stirring those passions among any population.  As bread riots and shantytowns grew in number, many began to seek alternatives to the status quo.  Demonstrations in the nation's capital increased, as Americans grew increasingly weary with President Hoover's perceived inaction.  The demonstration that drew the most national attention was the Bonus Army march of 1932.

 

MORE: http://www.ushistory.org/us/48c.asp

 

"When the Senate rejected their demands on June 17, most of the veterans dejectedly returned home. But several thousand remained in the capital with their families. Many had nowhere else to go. The Bonus Army conducted itself with decorum and spent their vigil unarmed."

 

Hardly "angry mobs killing us for our possessions", I would say, despite the gross overreaction by the government.  The Battle of Athens (TN) was far more violent, and in reaction to corruption not economics.

 

What always amazed me is it never seemed to occur to anyone to make the bonus certificates transferable.

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