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Northside apartments get a name

 

A long-awaited development at Hamilton Avenue and Blue Rock Street in Northside will be called Gantry, Indianapolis-based developer Milhaus revealed Wednesday morning.

 

A gantry is a frame or platform, often used in connection with railroads, according to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary.

 

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/developingnow/2013/10/30/northside-apartments-get-name-gantry/

 

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What's 3CDC doing with the former Butternut bread factory?

Tom Demeropolis Reporter- Cincinnati Business Courier  

 

 

Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. quietly purchased the former Butternut bread factory in the West End last month, but the nonprofit real estate development and finance organization is mum on its plans for the property.

 

A 3CDC affiliate, Interstate Holdings LLC, purchased 747 W. Fifth St., 805 Fifth St. and 401 Linn St. for $1.85 million in October, according to Hamilton County property records.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/blog/2013/11/whats-3cdc-doing-with-the-former.html

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What's 3CDC doing with the former Butternut bread factory?

Tom Demeropolis Reporter- Cincinnati Business Courier  

 

 

Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. quietly purchased the former Butternut bread factory in the West End last month, but the nonprofit real estate development and finance organization is mum on its plans for the property.

 

A 3CDC affiliate, Interstate Holdings LLC, purchased 747 W. Fifth St., 805 Fifth St. and 401 Linn St. for $1.85 million in October, according to Hamilton County property records.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/blog/2013/11/whats-3cdc-doing-with-the-former.html

 

That is right across the street from the old Hudepohl Brewery.  That whole area is extremely close to downtown, has lots of parking, etc. It's really ripe for development.

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^ It's also very poorly connected to downtown.  There's a miserable tangle of ramps, overpasses, and limited sidewalk connections.  There's got to be a better way to cross I-75 as a pedestrian or cyclist than 3rd Street, which is the "least unpleasant" way to go now. 

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It's easy to get to. I drive by everyday to avoid the daily River Rd backup. It is somewhat isolated, but right next to UPS and the Museum Center storage building.

 

A scrap yard was cleared out nearby years ago. Plus the jail is now empty. I'd say it's a substantial amount land for something. Light industrial, maybe. Plus big piles of coal to stare at. The elevated rail line is nearby and is loud as heck.

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WCPO has been doing a multi-part investigative report about how downtown developments are "subsidized". I don't even have the energy to respond to this nonsense. They are also questioning whether downtown can handle all of these new apartments that are going to be developed over the next few years. Well, if Cranley follows through on his campaign promises to stop investing in downtown, you can bet the demand will slow down.

 

http://www.wcpo.com/money/local-business-news/taxpayers-cover-more-than-a-third-of-downtown-cincinnati-boom

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WCPO has been doing a multi-part investigative report about how downtown developments are "subsidized". I don't even have the energy to respond to this nonsense. They are also questioning whether downtown can handle all of these new apartments that are going to be developed over the next few years. Well, if Cranley follows through on his campaign promises to stop investing in downtown, you can bet the demand will slow down.

 

http://www.wcpo.com/money/local-business-news/taxpayers-cover-more-than-a-third-of-downtown-cincinnati-boom

 

I read this article yesterday and just had to shake my head.  They use a projection based on past increases which were very small.  Since momentum has picked up downtown and you have many people on a waiting list, you therefore cannot use this report to project the need for downtown living.  Using that report is just idiotic, but I'm assuming the reporter was going for the doom and gloom aspect of reporting.  Did this reporter work for the Enquirer at any point?   

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Actually, he used to work for the Business Courier. WCPO hired good journalists from other publications (Dan Monk and Lucy May from the Business Courier, Kevin Osborne from CityBeat) and managed to turn them into shills for their anti-city narrative. I hope they're getting paid well enough to justify their total loss of integrity.

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The recent WCPO narrative seems weird. It really feels like the suburban powers-that-be decided the city had to much momentum and they needed to restore the narrative of decline before things got out of control.

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I'm not worried about the Saks leaving.  Retail is changing dramatically.  Malls are declining, shopping in general is declining as more people buy things online, etc.

 

I would LOVE to see this building torn down and a high rise replace it. 

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Does anybody know more details about this condo project at the corner of Shaw and Observatory, in Hyde Park? http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2013/10/28/developers-building-large-luxury.html?page=all

 

I created a map (attached) showing what I think are the buildings they acquired (but I'm not sure because the article doesn't specify exactly which properties were acquired). Sounds like their plan is to tear all those 5 buildings down to build new condos.

 

Those are the correct parcels.  It's owned by North American Properties now and being developed by Greiwe Development.

 

This is the same partnership that has "fulfilled Mary Emery's vision" in Mariemont with the 4 phase development near the square.  Their MO is high quality, high density, high price condos near town squares.  While I loved that art deco-ish building at the corner that has come down, I'm certain this will be a great edition to Hyde Park's core.

 

here is what they did in Mariemont:

171273_2.jpg

emery-park6.jpg

EHJtrashfees_51.jpg

 

Here is a map showing the properties in relation to the center of Mariemont:

map.jpg

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Those condos in Marriemont replaced, I believe, the village's only apartment buildings.  I heard that they were torn down and these condos green-lighted in order to prevent section 8 from ever happening in the village.

 

 

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^ There's a whole bunch of apartments along Murray Avenue and the "Old Towne" section along Oak, Beech, Chestnut, and Maple.  Same with Center Street and Wooster Pike west of the square.  I'd imagine some of those have been turned into condos but certainly not all of them.  All the deep red in this map (which is admittedly a bit out of date at this point) is multi-family.  Condo is purple striped and there's very little of it.  It's certainly an odd and rather coarse transect, but at the very least there's a lot of multi-unit buildings which are pretty old and haven't been substantially renovated.     

 

mariemont.jpg

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Catholic Health Partners looking for a new office building.. about double the size of their current building off of 71s. 

 

It says they are looking at locations across greater Cincinnati.  Lets hope they choose to stay downtown and build a tower on a parking lot somewhere... or could possibly fill the office tower proposed at the banks?

 

Regardless, losing this company to the suburbs would be a blow.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2013/11/15/catholic-health-partners-on-the-hunt.html

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They are pretty landlocked. If they had built the garage along Interstate 71 instead of between their building and Staple's, they might have more room to expand. But their building is quite tall and pretty attractive - I would see little reason that it wouldn't be able to be reused pretty quickly.

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>^ There's a whole bunch of apartments along Murray Avenue and the "Old Towne" section along Oak, Beech, Chestnut, and Maple

 

Sorry about that, I might have been confusing Marriemont and Mediera. 

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Those meetings got downright hostile. Basically, older white folks up there blatantly said we don't want "those" people at "those" complexes (that were proposed). The buildings were very nice - for apartment complexes, and weren't anything architecturally significant. But in a city with very few rental options and home values that are pretty darn high, options are needed, especially for those that work at Kenwood.

 

There was a Facebook group for the organization behind the protests, and flyers were distributed. I commented once on their page and was effectively banned - it was in response to a pretty nasty writing against the complex that had some serious racial overtones to it.

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Anyone know what is happening over near Short Vine? The entire block across from Kroger that contained a US Bank building has been demolished. I assume another Uptown Rental project, but I am unsure.

 

Are you talking about the Fifth Third that used to be at Corry & Euclid?

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It's a massive one, with a 3 story garage (one level underground), a 4 story apartment building and then 2 story townhomes facin. Euclid (large building behind them).  It's a smart design to allow for density but not impose upon Euclid, but it's success will come down to quality of materials.

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Anyone know what is happening over near Short Vine? The entire block across from Kroger that contained a US Bank building has been demolished. I assume another Uptown Rental project, but I am unsure.

 

Are you talking about the Fifth Third that used to be at Corry & Euclid?

 

The US Bank is over at E. University just west of Reading.

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Cool, I have been keeping a similar running tally myself. There is also the Broadway Square project which includes 78 apartments and retail. In total, I count 1,419 apartments and 68-78 condos currently being planned to come online within the next few years.

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Cool, I have been keeping a similar running tally myself. There is also the Broadway Square project which includes 78 apartments and retail. In total, I count 419 apartments and 68-78 condos currently being planned to come online within the next few years.

 

So that's somewhere in the range of 600-1200 new residents in those projects alone?

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^Much more than than. There are around 1,250 units listed on that map, plus the 70ish for Broadway Square. Let's just call it 1,300 units. At an occupancy of around 1.5 per unit we can expect another 2,000 or so residents in Downtown and Pendleton from these projects alone. And that doesn't even include the hundreds of new units under construction/planned/proposed/etc. in OTR.

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Somehow a digit was missing from my previous post (I have corrected it now). That should have been: 1,419 apartments and 68-78 condos.

 

This figure includes:

580 Building - 179 apartments

Banks II - 305 apartments

Fourth and Race (Pogue's) - 300 apartments

Fountain Place (Fountain Square West) - 225 apartments

Seventh & Broadway - 111 apartments

Peak Property Group Buildings on 7th - 75 apartments

Schwartz Building - 20 apartments

Mercer Commons - 126 apartments and 28 condos

Broadway Square - 78 apartments

Ingalls Building - 40-50 condos

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It will be really cool to see that many more people downtown in just a year or two.  It will also be interesting to see if politics change as more people move down there and otr.  Politicians might have to cater more to that crowd with the constituency growing there.  cough cough streetcar :laugh:

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Does anybody know why downtown has 7 (seven!) Subways? Zero McDonald's. Zero Burger Kings. Only 1 Wendy's. What is it about Subway's business model that makes them open 7 stores in such a small radius? (Insert joke about our city's great commitment to subways throughout history.)

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