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NYC: Hudson Yards

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development news around the westside railyards/javits convention center at the yet-to-be developed northernmost end of the highline park:

 

 

 

From Ashes of Olympic Bid, a Future Rises for the Far West Side

 

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An Olympic stadium never rose over Hudson Yards, but several towers have been built nearby.

 

 

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A developer has plans for 12 commercial and residential towers, a park and a cultural center over the rail yards south of 33rd Street.

 

 

By CHARLES V. BAGLI

Published: November 27, 2011

 

 

Late in his first term, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg suffered a stinging defeat when, after an extensive planning and public relations effort, New York City lost its bid to host the 2012 Summer Olympics.

 

Now, though, a vibrant neighborhood is rising in the area where the Olympic stadium and complex would have stood on the Far West Side of Manhattan. As a result, officials, developers and urban planners are embracing an unlikely notion: the Olympic bid’s defeat may have been one of the best things to happen for the city’s growth in recent memory.

 

The Bloomberg administration repurposed many elements of the bid to create Hudson Yards, the commercial and residential district taking shape west of Eighth Avenue, a once-desolate area of factories, lofts and parking lots between 30th and 43rd Streets.

 

Fifteen sleek residential towers have sprung up since 2005, the year that the Olympic bid was rejected, and a dozen hotels have muscled their way onto these blocks.

 

This month, one of the city’s biggest developers, the Related Companies, announced tentative plans to erect a 51-story office tower on the spot where the Olympic stadium would have stood, with Coach, the luxury retailer, as the anchor tenant.

 

 

more:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/28/nyregion/on-far-west-side-bloombergs-failed-olympic-plan-spurs-development.html?pagewanted=all

 

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Hudson Yards is basically the size of a typical midsize city's downtown, but with a fraction of the parking.  Hudson Yards is capped at 6,000 parking spaces whereas DT Cincinnati has about 35,000.

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^ geez thats wild to think of it like that.

 

and, even crazier to imagine, it's all to be built on top of platforms over a big, busy working railyard.

 

 

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hudson-yards-aerial-train-tracks.jpg

 

 

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^ might be a good idea at some point, but for now we feast on renders...

 

 

holy mackeral -- it's the mother of all renders!!  :-o

 

hudson-yards-nyc-east-yards-dv-mir-122012.jpg

 

 

i think this 'knitted' residential bldg could be the winner?

check out the highline winding around way down there!

 

hudson-yards-nyc-living-here-d-tower-aerial-rooftop-dv-dsrdr-092012.jpg

 

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^ good question! yes, although that waterfront section seems lost in the hubub and still a little hazy to me. i'll keep an eye out from more news and renders.

 

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Maybe a MOD can make a Hudson Yards thread. Feel free to delete this comment if/when you do.

So let it be written, so let it be done.

 

Wow!  What a project!

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One of the most incredible developments I've seen in the United States in a long time. I hope it inspires similarly themed  developments in smaller cities, although admittedly the developments would be scaled smaller too.

 

And, sorry, but when I see this........

 

Hudson-Yards-Kohn-Pedersen-Fox-Associates-11-537x357.jpg

 

 

I couldn't help but think of this.......

 

quartz_crystals.jpg

 

crystals.JPG

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more on the hudson yards park

 

 

With Hudson Yards Comes a 4-Acre, 10-Block Long Park

 

Friday, December 7, 2012, by Jessica Dailey

 

The ceremonial groundbreaking for the Hudson Yards towers took place...but this isn't the first part of the West Side transformation to get underway. A four-acre stretch of tree-lined green space, called Hudson Park and Boulevard, that will connect Hudson Yards with 42nd Street broke ground earlier this year. The designs for the park were chosen way back in 2008, and aside from brief mentions in Hudson Yards updates, it seems like no one has really paid much attention to it over the last few years, despite it being billed as the central pedestrian spine that will connect the mega-development to the rest of the city.

 

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http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/12/07/with_hudson_yards_comes_a_4acre_10block_long_park.php

 

 

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a fascinating video animation showing how they are laying the deck over the open railyard for brookfield's manhattan west project nearby:

 

 

 

i peeked in for a photo yesterday:

 

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^ not sure how they will cap the hudson yards, which is to the west of that site and much larger and wider. they are working on the coach tower on the se corner now, which is right next to the yards, but does not require a cap.

 

 

 

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taken from the ohm tower nearby, here is a great view of progress on the coach tower,

the railyard decking and the highline renovation via a fellow former clevelander on ssp:

 

 

sept27 & oct3

null_zps9830f357.jpgnull_zps9f99ffb5.jpg

 

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working night and day around the railyards

 

 

manhattan west project cap crane

 

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to the west -- hudson yards project coach tower

 

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a really cool one minute video commemorating the one year anniversary of the beginning of the hudson yards and coach tower construction:

 

 

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this one is the corset residential tower on the sw side of hudson yards:

 

3B092EEB-7BA8-49C5-AD58-1378730202C2_zpsanhqiwnz.jpg

 

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the highline next to the corset

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and a render of the rather mysterious west end of hudson yards

FEC83072-332B-4B38-A1E4-A4D4B9F2A707_zpsxevcw7hg.jpg

 

 

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new year, new incredible renders released!

 

 

FA6BD9D0-3339-408F-A5A7-F5AFC0588289_zpsqs5l3qgk.jpg

 

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^ if you are wondering why there is nothing on the western waterfront half of the railyards its because nothing has been designed yet or released yet. it will be mostly residential. its also where related expects to make their money, do you can bet it will be on the way asap.

 

this is really all we have about it:

 

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^this actually looks a little better than the stuff going up at Ground Zero, but I'm sick of all this overdevelopment! Why not just build one giant 250 story building over 10 square miles of land? When will enough be enough? Maybe a deBlasio administration won't be so bad after all. At least his voice is more pleasant to listen to than Bloomberg's.

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It's the largest city in the country, one of if not the most important cities in the world, and is seeing massive demand in every regard for office space, residential space, retail space, etc. There's no such thing as 'enough' for a city like this. It will forever be changing. Buildings will continue getting bigger. Population will continue getting denser. Public spaces will continue to get better as they have been. The city is moving itself towards a new future and there's no reason to see massive developments that make use of incredibly underutilized space as being overdeveloped. Thinking a city should slow down and remain the same is asking a city to stagnate. And anyone on the Urbanohio board should know exactly what happens when a city stagnates.

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^I seriously doubt that New York will "stagnate" in the absence of this project. I assume that you, like the majority of people on this forum, are vehemently opposed to unbridled suburban sprawl, right? But doesn't this happen as a result of "massive demand" for McMansions and McDonalds by people who love that sort of lifestyle. Therefore it's a good thing, since there's no downside to developing all of that "incredibly underutilized space" (fields and farmlands). Anybody with any aesthetic objections should just get over it. After all, who really cares whether ever taller skyscrapers block the sun more and more, and whether streets and sidewalks in a particular neighborhood become ever more congested by virtue of squeezing more people into spaces already too tight to accommodate existing populations and overtaxing public services? Isn't this just the sort of thing urban planners are supposed to plan? Is this forum secretly controlled by the real estate industry?? :laugh:

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This one project won't cause NYC to stagnate, no. But an opposition to development in general will. NYC isn't too big to fall apart. It already almost happened in the 70s and 80s.

 

Restricting development just ups the price of the developments that do go through. It will only lead to an increase in the already extreme cost of living in NYC.

 

There's a huge difference between farmland and nature being redeveloped into McMansions and two whole city blocks being filled in in the densest place in this country. Farmland and undeveloped land IS already useful. A humongous piece of land within the heart of Manhattan that leads to the Hudson, connects to arguably the most successful urban park in the country, etc. should not just be a railyard.

 

Blocking the sun sounds exactly like the NIMBY lead arguments against the towers being built on 57th Street. The Hudson Yards has huge open public spaces. It's a city. Shadows exist. But it's not going to feel like you're in a cave like many seem to fear.

 

Maybe my opinion of what constitutes congestion is skewed, but never while in NYC have I felt like there were too many people with only one two exceptions and those were Times Square and the area around the WTC. Beyond that though I never felt like the sidewalks were not large enough to hold the people using them. Hell, even the trains in Manhattan at rush hour, though certainly crowded, were almost never SO crowded that people weren't able to get on. There was always room and almost always the only people who wouldn't get on chose not to do so, not because there wasn't room somewhere on the train.

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I don't know about stagnation, but opposition to development is the biggest single reason by housing is so expensive in NYC. Rent regulated tenants and homeowners can afford to oppose new development because they are mostly immune from the housing market (or even benefit from a tight market, if they sell their home or illegally sublet their apartment), but the rest of us suckers end up paying the price. Unfortunately, market rate tenants are a minority in NY and prospective residents who are priced out don't get a vote.

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I don't know about stagnation, but opposition to development is the biggest single reason by housing is so expensive in NYC. Rent regulated tenants and homeowners can afford to oppose new development because they are mostly immune from the housing market (or even benefit from a tight market, if they sell their home or illegally sublet their apartment), but the rest of us suckers end up paying the price. Unfortunately, market rate tenants are a minority in NY and prospective residents who are priced out don't get a vote.

 

O

I don't know about stagnation, but opposition to development is the biggest single reason by housing is so expensive in NYC. Rent regulated tenants and homeowners can afford to oppose new development because they are mostly immune from the housing market (or even benefit from a tight market, if they sell their home or illegally sublet their apartment), but the rest of us suckers end up paying the price. Unfortunately, market rate tenants are a minority in NY and prospective residents who are priced out don't get a vote.

In addition, there are so many people who have 2nd homes here, they don't care.  Neighbors ask me all the time why I don't attend CB, Park district or Block association meetings on a regular.  My house is an "investment".  As long as my house continues to appreciate, I not emotionally invested.

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i was starting to wonder again when this would happen and here it is.

 

now developers are talkin about adding an 1800' hudson spire nearby:

 

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DDA20B97-9C1C-4B88-B5F1-995D90330950_zpsylx7cesx.jpg

 

 

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