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Hipsters

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^ Hipsters are descendents of the "college rocker" in your taxonomy. The difference is that, after the movement died in the underground (IMO died, period), it ballooned in the mainstream with no competition.

 

When I was a punk kid in the '90s, I went to NYC a few times and was blown away by the idea that any fringe group was basically not fringe there, because the communities were so big. I think the Internet made that happen on a global scale. So the whole concept of underground has been revolutionized. That's one factor as to why no underground movements have replaced the hipster movement.

 

Another reason is the music tradition which founded hipsterism: indie rock. Indie rock is not a legitimate genre (like "college rock" before it). It's a big tent, and can conceptually accommodate many different tastes, styles, and innovations in music. So as tastes change and innovations happen, there's no need for a new movement.

 

Finally, there's the whole irony/postmodernism which defined hipster. This is another nebulous concept, much like the "genre" of indie rock. It brings the concepts of "alternative" or "underground" to their logical conclusion by rebelling in an infinite loop. When you get to that point where you can, e.g., rebel against pop culture and consumerism by buying pop albums "ironically" and pursuing a career in marketing, there's just nowhere else to go.

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August 28, 2014

HBO's 'Looking' needs extras to play San Francisco hipsters, bears, techies

By Giselle Velazquez

 

Looking to make a quick buck? "Looking" might be able to help.

 

The HBO series about a trio of gay San Franciscans needs extras starting next week, according to TheBoldItalic.com, and the casting agency has some interesting requests.

 

In addition to the "Hipsters, Techies, LGBT Community, Bar Goers, etc." needed to accurately populate The City, San Francisco-based Beau Bonneau Casting desperately needs hairy "bear types, cubs, chubs, otters, etc."

 

"Butch type" lesbians are required immediately, as are transgender individuals. And perhaps in recognition of Victoria Ramos, the Mission's legendary Tamale Lady, "Looking" needs a Latina with a "real, lived-in, interesting face" to portray its Pupusa Cart Lady and fictionally feed hordes of drunken hipsters, techies and bargoers, etc.

 

Extras will be paid San Francisco's minimum wage of $10.74 an hour, with extra for "Canoe/Kayak experienced Lifeguard Certified Men" and $250 a day for nude extras (no word on the rate for naked extras in canoes).

 

CONTINUED

http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/hbos-looking-needs-extras-to-play-san-francisco-hipsters-bears-techies/Content?oid=2886037

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Oh yeah.  A lot of cell phone and "lifestyle" commercials are combining whistling over ukehlelehe(sp?) strumming, then punctuating the whole affair with some dorky twitter phrase like "Morning Win!".  I don't know what that one advertises, I just know that it makes me tense up when I hear it.  Luckily my exposure to TV uhekelehele's and whistling is limited to my workplace's break room. 

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August 28, 2014

HBO's 'Looking' needs extras to play San Francisco hipsters, bears, techies

By Giselle Velazquez

 

Looking to make a quick buck? "Looking" might be able to help.

 

The HBO series about a trio of gay San Franciscans needs extras starting next week, according to TheBoldItalic.com, and the casting agency has some interesting requests.

 

In addition to the "Hipsters, Techies, LGBT Community, Bar Goers, etc." needed to accurately populate The City, San Francisco-based Beau Bonneau Casting desperately needs hairy "bear types, cubs, chubs, otters, etc."

 

"Butch type" lesbians are required immediately, as are transgender individuals. And perhaps in recognition of Victoria Ramos, the Mission's legendary Tamale Lady, "Looking" needs a Latina with a "real, lived-in, interesting face" to portray its Pupusa Cart Lady and fictionally feed hordes of drunken hipsters, techies and bargoers, etc.

 

Extras will be paid San Francisco's minimum wage of $10.74 an hour, with extra for "Canoe/Kayak experienced Lifeguard Certified Men" and $250 a day for nude extras (no word on the rate for naked extras in canoes).

 

CONTINUED

http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/hbos-looking-needs-extras-to-play-san-francisco-hipsters-bears-techies/Content?oid=2886037

 

This pissed me off as it wasn't entirely correct.

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^"Pupusa Cart Lady" LOL I don't think we have those in NY, do we? I've seen churros and mango carts, though. I once read that one of those mango ladies made enough money to send her kids to college!

 

Try Queens, the boro, not the people!  LOL

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I'm now seeing hipsters in East Oakland. Hell has frozen over...

The only thing I know about East Oakland is that is where Too $hort is from...

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^"Pupusa Cart Lady" LOL I don't think we have those in NY, do we? I've seen churros and mango carts, though. I once read that one of those mango ladies made enough money to send her kids to college!

 

we have the "sainted" arepa cart lady. who recently opened her own restaurant which i need to try one of these days. we made her an early internet star on the old chowhound website way back in the 1900s.

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East Oakland still has North Toledo or East Cleveland-level crime statistics. It has areas of extreme ghetto that are by far the worst in the Bay Area. It never suffered population loss since it has been a major immigration point from Mexico for decades (it largely lacks abandonment), but its "feel" is Rust Belt ghetto. It's a flat industrial area with port, manufacturing, and warehouse facilities. It also includes Oakland's Airport. Oakland is not Brooklyn. Oakland is Newark with hipsters and money. The New York Times was way off. The only similarities are the hipsters, but Brooklyn hipsters are much nicer than Oakland hipsters.

 

Oakland: Brooklyn by the Bay

By MATT HABERMAY 2, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/04/fashion/oakland-california-brooklyn-by-the-bay.html?_r=0

 

Other than having two BART stations (not nearly enough for its population density), there is nothing about East Oakland attractive to hipsters. It just goes to show you how desperate kids are for housing in the Bay Area. They're moving into known gang and cartel territories that the understaffed Oakland Police have had a lot of trouble controlling (they've been shot at and killed in East Oakland). It's not a nice area, and probably the last place that's safe for hipsters in the Bay Area, who many times are the targets of crime (always looking at phones and no situational awareness).

 

Then again, West Oakland long suffered from similar problems and it's gentrifying at warp speed (first stop on BART from SF, Google busses, etc.). Still, hipsters have not been welcomed with open arms...

 

West Oakland Coffee Shop Vandalized Hours After Gentrification Protests

Wendi Jonassen | June 13, 2014

 

Two people wearing black hoodies and black face masks hurled five rocks through the windows of Kilovolt, a newly established coffee shop on Mandela Parkway at 1 a.m. on Thursday, breaking several windows, scratching countertops, and damaging the coffee brewing machine. The vandalism occurred just a few hours after the Oakland Planning Commission approved the West Oakland Specific Plan (WOSP), a controversial redevelopment plan, with a vote of 4-2.

 

Prior to the meeting, protesters opposed to WOSP marched from DeFremery Park, according to an article published in a anarchist publication, Fireworks. Some demonstrators tried to block the entrance of the meeting, while others used the public comments period to discuss gentrification and rising rents.

 

Ethan Ashley, the owner of Kilovolt, strongly believes there is a connection between the vandalism and the WOSP protesters. During the rally and march, fliers titled “Spread the Struggle Against Gentrification” distributed among the crowd called specifically for vandalism.

 

“Oakland is becoming unrecognizable. Fight back. Vandalize development and gentrifying businesses.” These were some of the phrases printed on the fliers that feature a giant hand clawing at a map of West Oakland (oddly resembling old Nazi Propoganda poster, as reported by the East Bay Express).

 

This is not the first time Kilovolt has been vandalized since opening in late April.

 

Within the first two weeks of opening, someone spray painted ‘Eat Shit Yuppies‘ on the exterior of Kilovolt and poured glue in the locks. Someone seems to have come forward to take credit for that specific act in a comment on IndieBay.

 

http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/06/13/2014/-west-oakland-coffee-shop-vandalized

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It is dumb since Oakland is not like Brooklyn. It's much smaller, much less dense, and the transit is inferior since BART wasn't built to metro rail standards outside of Downtown SF (four subway stations) and Downtown Oak (three subway stations). Brooklyn still has a lot of natives left too. People overlook how big it is and that the hipster zone is really just a small chunk of it. By contrast, San Francisco and Oakland hardly have any natives left. This is due to lack of new construction. With gentrification, the only option is displacement since people in the Bay Area keep voting down and protesting new housing proposals.

 

The protests of new construction in hipster neighborhoods really make my blood boil. People have no concept of supply and demand. You constantly see people on the streets yelling about gentrification in one sentence and then demanding bans on new construction in the next. The West Oakland Specific Plan is the greatest thing to happen in West Oakland in decades, and people are furious about it? Screw these anti-development idiots. We need this housing bad. We needed it years ago. The Bay is twisted in its political logic...

 

I do give Oakland's political leadership some credit for ignoring the protests and forcing through some big projects recently (WOSP, Brooklyn Basin, etc.). They're showing more backbone than San Francisco's leadership. It's still not as pro-development as LA, but Oakland seems like it's at a major political turning point. Perhaps it could be the first pro-urban, pro-development city in the Bay Area?

 

*Also, the mayor of Oakland, Jean Quan, does compare it to Brooklyn:

 

Mayor Jean Quan herself made the comparison to the National Journal last week, saying, “We’re a little bit like Brooklyn. Because Oakland is so much more affordable than San Francisco, the whole arts scene has shifted over here. The food scene has taken off. Those kinds of cultural things have made Oakland very desirable.” Her words seem like a guarded yet unmistakable shot across the bow at Ed Lee and his mind-bogglingly unaffordable city. Yet both locales are afflicted by and benefiting from the same general trends; San Francisco is just further along. Quan sees an ascendant Oakland sponging up everything quirky and livable about SF as it becomes a playground for the ultra-rich.

 

But there are lots of ways in which Quan’s comparison of OAK = BKLN falls apart. For one thing, Oakland’s a separate city, not subject to the vicissitudes and policies of a mayor it didn’t vote for, and far enough away that you can’t walk there from the West Bay. At 400,000 people, Oakland’s population is half as big as SF’s and about one-seventh the size of Brooklyn (which is itself twice as populous as Manhattan). Crime in Oakland is considerably higher – the murder rate is more than four times that of New York, and there are six times as many burglaries. And while magically 25 degrees warmer in July than its neighbor, Oakland lacks a certain mystique that, through the alchemy of late capitalism, frequently transmutes into a brand – be it dreaded by long-term residents or lauded by elected officials and other boosters. Without putting Oakland down the way Gertrude Stein’s remark is frequently (mis)interpreted, there are no “Oakland Pickles” or “Oakland Industries” sweatshirts, yet. And much to that city’s credit, at least no celebs are naming their daughter “Oakland.”

 

http://www.thebolditalic.com/articles/3754-how-apt-is-the-oakland-brooklyn-comparison-anyway

 

*WOSP is probably an attempt to not whitewash that neighborhood's African-American history like was done in historically minority neighborhoods in San Francisco. San Francisco changed the names of some neighborhoods when it gentrified. This made people angry, particularly long-time residents. Oakland is not changing the names of any neighborhoods yet as far as I can tell. So you see these names for redevelopment projects that avoid giving "white" names to historically minority neighborhoods. They know no one will ever refer to the place as the "West Oakland Specific Plan." A silly redevelopment name like that means the older neighborhood names will stick. Development names can be tricky business...particularly in a politically charged place like Oakland.

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And I agree with this quote:

 

At times, it feels as though many Oakland proponents of the analogy are ex-San Franciscans who want to be cooler than San Francisco by being as cool as Brooklyn. (It is universally understood among cool kids that Manhattan is no longer cool). Oakland will be the new Brooklyn for a little while until San Francisco becomes so insidiously homogeneous that every last non-techie decamps for Fruitvale, and then it will presumably supersede San Francisco altogether.

 

Oakland hipsters are the worst in America. There is so much insecurity and judging in them. I can't even get served at half of the white people bars in Oakland. The number of glares I get walking down the street in Uptown blows my mind. I suspect most would live in the Mission District if they could. Thankfully, the other half of Oakland is much more tolerable. Oakland has a mix of some of the biggest hipster douchebags, worst gang bangers, and nicest upper class people in the Bay Area. But that ignores the sheer diversity of the place and the fact it's one of the few urban areas in the Bay getting more diverse. It's still a big immigration point for Latin America and Asia (particularly China- I find Oakland's Chinatown superior to all three of San Francisco's). That aspect of Oakland is awesome. I think its big social divides and tension result from the sheer diversity of the place, and extreme inequality (which seems more extreme than San Francisco). Oakland has about twice the diversity of San Francisco and it's a lot more integrated. It's more similar to Los Angeles in its racial makeup and is easily one of the most diverse cities in the country.

 

But overall, Oakland is not cooler than San Francisco. And San Francisco is not cooler than Los Angeles or New York. Like SF, Oakland is losing a lot of its talented artists and musicians to cities like LA and Austin. Oakland does have some great urban neighborhoods like Downtown, Old Oakland, Jack London Square, Piedmont, and the whole string of hoods surrounding Lake Merritt, but it's a secondary city somewhat like Long Beach. Though Long Beach doesn't have as much political tension and its hipsters are far nicer. But in terms of size, scale, economy, industry, and weather, Oakland = Long Beach.

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^Yes, they get along. The nerds are hipsters.

 

*The only exception would be the anarchist hipsters who are anti-tech, anti-business, and anti-capitalism. Oakland has more of the anarchist hipsters. The Mission District hipster scene is all tied up with the tech industry. Oakland hipsters seem about half pro-tech (they work in San Francisco tech), half anti-tech.

 

Anarchist hipsters are unique to Oakland and they don't get along with anybody. They're generally just hateful people.

 

You see these divides among hipsters in Oakland during big events like Art Murmur. At face value, both hipster groups look exactly the same. They sport mainstream Bay Area style of unkept beards, endless tattoos, facial piercings, skinny jeans, hipster glasses, bad haircuts, etc. The similarities end there. The anarchist hipsters absolutely hate tech hipsters and protest them at every turn, including vandalizing their businesses like stated in that article. This is hipster-on-hipster crime and it's common in Oakland. Anarchist hipsters sometimes attack tech hipster coffee shops and Google busses. The goal of the anarchists is to keep tech out of Oakland. So far, they've largely succeeded, but with SF having the highest rents in the nation, tech is coming whether these people want it or not. Downtown Oakland's office space is excellent and a mere fraction the price of San Francisco since there is still some office vacancy. Many in Oak are calling Downtown Oakland "The Next SOMA" or "SOMA 2.0." With BART and proximity to San Francisco, it's bound to happen. There also are more lots to build on that have crappy low-rises or are still vacant still from the recession (lots of stalled skyscraper projects). There is more space for Oakland to grow. If everything proposed gets built, it could be pushing 500,000 people by 2020. One of the biggest projects in the city's history just got started with Brooklyn Basin. It's big, dense, urban, and yes, has a waterfront location kind of like Brooklyn. Oakland is in an absolute population explosion right now and seems to be growing faster than San Francisco. Lots of big proposals are coming for Downtown Oakland and Jack London Square. That's where Oakland has a lot in common with Brooklyn. Downtown Oakland like Downtown Brooklyn is a secondary urban office market with good pre-WW2 bones. And they're both seeing tons of development. The anarchist hipsters hate all the this development and growth.

 

The fact that there are all these sub-hipster groups in the Bay just goes to show how far down the cultural hole it has gone...

 

*But one thing is certain. The anarchist hipsters will lose. Being anti-business is a dumb strategy, particularly in a regional economic boom.

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^Yes, they get along. The nerds are hipsters.

 

*The only exception would be the anarchist hipsters who are anti-tech, anti-business, and anti-capitalism. Oakland has more of the anarchist hipsters. The Mission District hipster scene is all tied up with the tech industry. Oakland hipsters seem about half pro-tech (they work in San Francisco tech), half anti-tech.

 

Anarchist hipsters are unique to Oakland and they don't get along with anybody. They're generally just hateful people.

 

You see these divides among hipsters in Oakland during big events like Art Murmur. At face value, both hipster groups look exactly the same. They sport mainstream Bay Area style of unkept beards, endless tattoos, facial piercings, skinny jeans, hipster glasses, bad haircuts, etc. The similarities end there. The anarchist hipsters absolutely hate tech hipsters and protest them at every turn, including vandalizing their businesses like stated in that article. This is hipster-on-hipster crime and it's common in Oakland. Anarchist hipsters sometimes attack tech hipster coffee shops and Google busses. The goal of the anarchists is to keep tech out of Oakland. So far, they've largely succeeded, but with SF having the highest rents in the nation, tech is coming whether these people want it or not. Downtown Oakland's office space is excellent and a mere fraction the price of San Francisco since there is still some office vacancy. Many in Oak are calling Downtown Oakland "The Next SOMA" or "SOMA 2.0." With BART and proximity to San Francisco, it's bound to happen. There also are more lots to build on that have crappy low-rises or are still vacant still from the recession (lots of stalled skyscraper projects). There is more space for Oakland to grow. If everything proposed gets built, it could be pushing 500,000 people by 2020. One of the biggest projects in the city's history just got started with Brooklyn Basin. It's big, dense, urban, and yes, has a waterfront location kind of like Brooklyn. Oakland is in an absolute population explosion right now and seems to be growing faster than San Francisco. Lots of big proposals are coming for Downtown Oakland and Jack London Square. That's where Oakland has a lot in common with Brooklyn. Downtown Oakland like Downtown Brooklyn is a secondary urban office market with good pre-WW2 bones. And they're both seeing tons of development. The anarchist hipsters hate all the this development and growth.

 

The fact that there are all these sub-hipster groups in the Bay just goes to show how far down the cultural hole it has gone...

 

*But one thing is certain. The anarchist hipsters will lose. Being anti-business is a dumb strategy, particularly in a regional economic boom.

 

Weren't the Oakland anarchists the ones who tried to shut down the port as part of "Occupy", until the ILU had a little "chat" with them?

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^Some were, yes.

 

Occupy Oakland got so big (and violent) it attracted more outsiders too. It was quite a bit different from what was going on in New York. Brooklyn's hipster areas don't have the crime of Oakland's hipster areas (well, Uptown has gotten nice and safe, but West Oakland and Temescal still have problems). There is always potential for things to get out of hand in Oakland during any protest. The cops are understaffed (half the per capita rate of Detroit) and dealing with lots of police hate. It is nothing like the situation in New York where NYPD is well-staffed and can effectively police the city.

 

The hipster anarchists mainly attack tech hipsters while failing to realize they are gentrifiers themselves. Every hipster anarchist I've met has not been native to Oakland. A few have been from Berkeley or Bay Area suburbs, but their connections to the city seem minimal. Oakland is a transplant town like San Francisco or Los Angeles. The anarchist hipster movement is overwhelmingly white 20-something college grads from good backgrounds. They have a lot more in common with those tech workers than they admit...I think a lot of it is just jealously. If you're an evicted Oakland (or San Francisco) native who just watched your family get thrown to the streets, you have a reason to be upset (and you should be upset at the NIMBY's and politicians). If you're Suzy Sorority Turned Hipster, you have far less to complain about. It has been said before, but some people do call Bay Area hipsters "yuppies with tattoos." There is some truth to that.

 

And "yuppie" is the ultimate insult anarchist hipsters/hippies throw at tech hipsters. Nothing is worse for a hipster in San Francisco or Oakland than being called a yuppie. This all goes back to the Yuppie Eradication Project of the 90's:

 

http://www.buzzfeed.com/justinesharrock/san-franciscos-last-rebellion-against-the-techies#24f2hg2

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Battle-Over-Gentrification-Gets-Ugly-in-S-F-s-2926395.php

 

Hipsters in SF and Oak own the hipster label since it's dominant, mainstream culture. It's never an insult in the Mission District, Temescal, or Uptown Oakland. Now say "yuppie," and people find it extremely offensive. Yuppie is a term associated with clean-cut northern San Francisco neighborhoods (North Beach, Russian Hill, Nob Hill, Marina, Pacific Heights, Laurel Heights, maybe throw Inner Richmond in too). When a hipster is called a yuppie, it raises all sorts of identity issues. It attacks their hipster credibility. "Wait, I'm really one of those North Beach people, just with tattoos?"

 

Yuppie style and even just looking good is very counter-culture to San Francisco and Oakland.

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^Yeah, it's simple class warfare and just makes the Bay Area worse for it. These are the same people protesting new construction at every turn. They are just not very bright and lack a basic understanding of economics. There is a pretty widespread belief in the Bay Area that new housing does nothing to level off prices. It is political insanity. And it's not just homeowners arguing this stuff (of course they don't want new housing since that's competition which might limit property value growth), but also service sector anarchist hipsters and hippies. Sometimes you'll even meet a normal working class native arguing it. That makes me sad because they've been hoodwinked by the wealthier NIMBY influences who do not have their interests at heart.

 

We need housing incredibly bad, but there is a large group of people (both rich and poor) blocking it with referendums and insane new laws like Proposition B. It's like these people want more inequality and hyper-gentrification:

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/blog/2014/06/prop-b-results-waterfront-ballot-measure.html?page=all

 

Another example:

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/blog/real-estate/2014/07/16th-street-bart-housing-project-maximus-mission.html

 

This was a great trasit-oriented project at the heart of the nation's most expensive hipster district. The Mission is one of the most expensive places on earth per square foot and suffers from extreme housing shortages leading to open houses in the hundreds and all-cash multi-million dollar home sales in hours. So a developer comes along with a great transit-adjacent high-rise proposal to build some much-needed housing. What do people do? They protest at every turn. Another example:

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/blog/real-estate/2014/09/millennium-properties-condo-706-mission-mexican.html

 

The NIMBYism in the hipster districts is astounding. What you're seeing in the Mission District and West Oakland defies all economic logic. The only major hipster district in the Bay Area that seemed easier to build in was Uptown Oakland. The reason? It was mostly abandoned and ghetto when it started gentrifying. There was likely no one left to protest. Now that it's populated, it's getting more controversial. Hipster district projects are always hotly contested. It takes nothing to set off controversy or get a business shut down. This was a classic example in hipster-friendly Haight last year:

 

This afternoon at 3pm, Jim Angelus closed his brick-and-mortar location of Bacon Bacon, bringing an end to a controversy that has made headlines throughout the week. Long story short: A neighbor’s complaints — mainly about the bacon odor — have led to the Department of Health saying that Bacon Bacon must shut down today. Porcine supporters have amassed nearly 2,000 signatures, and Angelus was holding out hope until this afternoon that the neighbors would drop their complaint. In fact, he says that the two sides came to an agreement yesterday, given Bacon Bacon’s $30,000 worth of improvements.

 

“They had a change of heart yesterday and said they want to run more tests,” says Angelus, who must now close for three months, until the July hearing where they can procure their proper permits. He says four employees will likely lose their jobs, unless they want to hang around for the approval, which he hopes will happen.

 

http://insidescoopsf.sfgate.com/blog/2013/05/17/bacon-bacon-forced-to-shutter-its-cafe/

 

On a lighter note, to give an idea of how respected hipsters are in the area, I was on a date with a girl who I called a hipster a while back. Her eyes lit up in excitement like she had finally "arrived." It was the best compliment I could have given her.

 

My old roommate was the same way. She was thrilled when anyone said she had hipster tendencies (but she wasn't a hipster). There is a large group of kids who move to the Bay to "escape the shackles of fashion in East Coast and Great Lakes cities". A lot of them adopt mainstream Bay Area fashion immediately upon moving. It's pretty hilarious to watch.

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Kind of like how dudes who move to Boston always end up sort-of abandoning their hometown team for Red Sox hats.  They all wish that their home team had the heritage, stadium, and cool hat that the Red Sox have.   

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Kind of like how dudes who move to Boston always end up sort-of abandoning their hometown team for Red Sox hats.  They all wish that their home team had the heritage, stadium, and cool hat that the Red Sox have.   

 

The Douchebag Nation has plenty of fans outside of Boston proper.  The Sox hat his part of required wardrobe for many a drunken Midwestern frat boy, who claim some sort of Irish heritage to justify their alcoholic binges.  It is usually included in a weekly rotation of hats that include a South Carolina Gamecocks variant.

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^Oh yeah, I remember those BoSox hats being common in Midwestern frats. Boston has always been lauded in Greek Life. I don't know much about the city, but it sounds pretty fratty.

 

*On a related note, I know some ex-Bostonians who moved to the Bay to become hipsters, so maybe Boston is not very hipster-friendly? A lot of the older East Coast and Great Lakes cities have a mainstream style that is not hipster.

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Take away those classic uniforms and Fenway and Boston mythology there's not a lot of there there.  The overall notoriety of the Red Sox franchise is better than a few of the other original teams like The Phillies but it's way behind The Cardinals, and you don't see anyone wearing St. Louis hats outside of St. Louis.  The fandom for the Red Sox isn't for the team, it's for all that stuff that surrounds it.  It's lot like hipster fandom for particular bands, movies, or other cultural phenomena.  They don't actually care about what they associate themselves with at the moment.  In 2-3 years they'll deny that they were ever interested in whatever it was. 

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Haha, yeah, the New York Yankees they are not. :wink:

 

From what I hear, the fame is due to Fenway's frat party atmosphere. Maybe it's like Wrigley Field?

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From what I hear, the fame is due to Fenway's frat party atmosphere. Maybe it's like Wrigley Field?

 

My impression of Boston is that is has a lot of bro/frat types similar to Chicago's North Side. I also think in has a lot of Irish/Italian meathead types that are kind of like a Boston version of a guido (Chicago does not really have this).

 

I don't get the impression that Boston is very hipster, except for some culture that goes along with the the MIT & Harvard nerd culture.

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^ Maybe you just need to know where to look?

 

Somerville is allegedly one of the world's top 5 hipster cities outside Brooklyn:

http://www.metro.us/newyork/lifestyle/travel/2014/09/15/worlds-hipster-cities-top-5/

 

The Globe has noticed:

http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/style/2013/08/22/some-somerville-worry-become-too-hip-for-its-own-good/Ibas2h5Q5p9MTl82qQ2OwK/story.html

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The Bay is twisted in its political logic...

 

Ha!  I told you all last year that "area" has been dropped and nobody wanted to believe me.

 

Now..... how about that state of Ohio?  I hear it is pretty nice there this time of year.  Anyone been?

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Yep.  We have all of your favorites..... hipsters, frat boys, bros, sissies, head0bangers, wankers, skallywags, and hoodwinkers.  The biggest deficiencies we have compared to Cali is probably silicon, both valleys and boobs.

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It is true that hipsters do flee Ohio in droves and are generally concentrated in in small geographic areas of Ohio cities such as OTR, the Downtowns, the Summit/4th/Indianola belt, Orgeon District etc. Though in Columbus there do seem to be some displaced hipsters in strip mall bars on like 161 and Bethel. It may be due to the sheer number of those kind of establishments around town.

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When I lived in Boston 12-13 years ago, Sommerville was a cultural wasteland.  I remember there being some sort of punk and hardcore event called Gravelfest which the police shut down, but otherwise it was a total mystery.  I used to live within walking distance of Union Square but there was no reason to go there.  I went to Inman Square maybe 2-3 times to the Abbey Lounge, which was completely townie and "undiscovered". 

 

At the time the hipsters, who were relatively few in number, lived in Allston or Brookline.  I'll scan some photos I took at a punk rock party there once -- the scene was absolutely hysterical.  I had a beer bottle thrown at me at full speed so I left, but the photos live on.  About half of those in attendance were wearing Danzig shirts and there was at least one giant Danzig flag hanging on one wall.  I've never seen a place with so many dedicated Danzig fans, except these dudes absolutely weren't cool. 

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