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A very insightful interview with Mayor Norton from CityLab. Talks about what brought the city to where it is, and how he thinks bankruptcy and/or a merger with Cleveland would be of benefit.

 

http://www.citylab.com/politics/2016/06/a-suburb-on-the-brink-of-bankruptcy/486248/

Does anyone have any idea how much it would actually cost Cleveland to take over East Cleveland? Also what are some of the benefits, if any, a city gets for having a population of over 400,000?

 

Cleveland and East Cleveland are still losing population. Would the combination be over 400,000 after 2020? Right now their combined populations are around 405K.

Correct, I'm not sure if they will be above 400K by 2020 but this gives them a much better chance. If i remember correctly Cleveland lost a measly 500 or so residents, a very small amount. With what would become the "East Cleveland neighborhood" so close to U.C., a booming neighborhood running out of real estate, i believe the flood gates would open and so much development would occur in what was Easy Cleeveland. This could jump start the neighborhood and allow more businesses to have space to build in the city limits. With so much vacant land and abandoned properties, you seemingly are in a midtown situation which allows you a canvas to extend the vibrance feel of UC. With a combination of new business and more land for residential there would be a great chance to build on the 405K population. This is me being an optimist though.

 

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It's interesting that EC has no debt, at least in the tradition sense of the word. I found the interview to be very straight forward and  frank, it's refreshing.

I found that to be interesting as well. Wasn't one of the big discussions on the merger about the pros and cons of taking on East Clevelands debt? I may be wrong.

 

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I heard one Glenville resident's perspective on E.C.'s potential merger:  It's sort of like a person who is pretty broke as it is and is barely maintaining his own house which needs a roof, gutters, downspouts, a new furnace, etc.,  has a cousin who has lost everything, has no home at all and can't help out with food, rent, or anything else... who wants to move in.  His perspective was, well, if E.C. is going to get attention when it comes to tearing down properties, fixing potholes, addressing crime, etc.- what about Glenville?  What about Collinwood?  What about the rest of the neighborhoods in the city which have been seeing the very same disinvestment which E.C. has seen but for a longer amount of time?  How does this merger help them?

 

It was an interesting perspective to say the least.

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I actually think those neighboring hoods would benefit the most from the merger.  Even if you are struggling with your own home, tearing down the crack house next door and consolidating the lots is a better situation to be in.

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It's more controversial than a Cleveland merger; but the easiest and most affordable path might be to unincorporate East Cleveland and let Cuyahoga County take over. 

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It's more controversial than a Cleveland merger; but the easiest and most affordable path might be to unincorporate East Cleveland and let Cuyahoga County take over. 

 

I've heard this proposed before...is it really possible?

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If Cuyahoga County were to get involved with anything, I'd rather see a city-county merger.

 

Well taking over East Cleveland would be a start.

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My one negative takeaway from East Cleveland's mayor is that he believes that using traffic cameras for revenue over safety is a sound initiative that serves the city. Traffic cameras, the cities involved, and their respective companies are in the business solely to generate a profit, and with so many of the companies bribing local officials (like in Columbus to the south and in countless other municipalities), it would not surprise me if East Cleveland's mayor was bought. The camera targets, for the worse, disproportionally harm the poor who cannot defend the tickets - many of which are generated when the equipment malfunctions or when it is illegally operated.

 

The state of Ohio now requires an officer to be present next to a camera, but this is on appeal - by municipalities like East Cleveland. But unlike other cities that have put booths to station an officer next to the camera or have removed the cameras, East Cleveland continue to rake in the revenue - $500,000/month. That's what they are billing, and isn't representative of what they are collecting - but a figure like that makes you wonder how much they collect.

 

And if the appeal is lost, then East Cleveland is on the hook for reimbursements for illegal camera operation and can be held liable for those expenses.

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A very insightful interview with Mayor Norton from CityLab. Talks about what brought the city to where it is, and how he thinks bankruptcy and/or a merger with Cleveland would be of benefit.

 

http://www.citylab.com/politics/2016/06/a-suburb-on-the-brink-of-bankruptcy/486248/

Does anyone have any idea how much it would actually cost Cleveland to take over East Cleveland? Also what are some of the benefits, if any, a city gets for having a population of over 400,000?

 

Cleveland and East Cleveland are still losing population. Would the combination be over 400,000 after 2020? Right now their combined populations are around 405K.

Correct, I'm not sure if they will be above 400K by 2020 but this gives them a much better chance. If i remember correctly Cleveland lost a measly 500 or so residents, a very small amount. With what would become the "East Cleveland neighborhood" so close to U.C., a booming neighborhood running out of real estate, i believe the flood gates would open and so much development would occur in what was Easy Cleeveland. This could jump start the neighborhood and allow more businesses to have space to build in the city limits. With so much vacant land and abandoned properties, you seemingly are in a midtown situation which allows you a canvas to extend the vibrance feel of UC. With a combination of new business and more land for residential there would be a great chance to build on the 405K population. This is me being an optimist though.

 

Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

 

 

 

I hope you are right, I'm just looking at current stats.

 

East Cleveland has lost about 400 people since 2010. Cleveland lost around 1K this last year alone. If Cleveland keeps losing people at the pace it has this decade, it will be below 400k by 2020 even with EC. So any 400k+ benefits would be fleeting.

 

Again, I'd love to be wrong about this.

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In terms of development one of the biggest issues in CLE is that there isn't a lot of available green space to develop on. And it's cheaper to develop new out of freakin old farmland than it is to redevelop. So I have always supported the merger and I continue to do so, but if the county and the state would agree to help pay for tearing down all of the vacant structures in East Cleveland to get that land ready for development I believe that it would be tremendous. This would really be the only place in the city where you could basically build a neighborhood from scratch. East Cleveland is a place built for 40,000 people that has 17,000 in it. There are some streets that literally have one or two active households living on the entire street, so you don't have to worry much about the controversies that surround displacement and gentrification. You really could start over there. That's exciting to me. And having that on your border will inevitably help Collinwood and Glenville much more than a deteriorating, rotting East Cleveland does today

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I was a little curious about the impact of Lakeview Cemetery and Forest Hills Park on the East Cleveland so I did some rough measurements and calculations... I made sure not to include the parts of both amenities that are located in Cleveland Hts.

 

EC is 8.027 Square kilometers

Lakeview is about 26 hectares,

Forest Hills Park is 1.13 square KM.

 

So in percentages; Lakeview is about 3% of East Cleveland and Forest Hills is 14%...

 

edit, also did Nela Park, which is 33 HA.

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No one will develop in East Cleveland as long as the city can't meet its obligations - and when the city has no rating. There is a newer subdivision up by Booth Hospital that has plenty of empty lots because of this problem specifically.

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In terms of development one of the biggest issues in CLE is that there isn't a lot of available green space to develop on. And it's cheaper to develop new out of freakin old farmland than it is to redevelop. So I have always supported the merger and I continue to do so, but if the county and the state would agree to help pay for tearing down all of the vacant structures in East Cleveland to get that land ready for development I believe that it would be tremendous. This would really be the only place in the city where you could basically build a neighborhood from scratch. East Cleveland is a place built for 40,000 people that has 17,000 in it. There are some streets that literally have one or two active households living on the entire street, so you don't have to worry much about the controversies that surround displacement and gentrification. You really could start over there. That's exciting to me. And having that on your border will inevitably help Collinwood and Glenville much more than a deteriorating, rotting East Cleveland does today

Only thing that would hurt me is seeing those once beautiful brick homes that line side streets possibly torn down. If Cleveland were to take it over I would want to hold out hope that those could be restored, Cleveland has a shortage of large brick homes like that.

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So if the municipality were unincorporated, it would be on the same legal footing as Olmsted Township and Chagrin Falls Township?

 

No very different. Townships are capable entities with pretty broad powers in Ohio.  The county would probably need a bit of organizational rework (or at least rethinking) to take on EC.  I doubt the current executive wants to do it. 

 

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So if the municipality were unincorporated, it would be on the same legal footing as Olmsted Township and Chagrin Falls Township?

 

No very different. Townships are capable entities with pretty broad powers in Ohio.  The county would probably need a bit of organizational rework (or at least rethinking) to take on EC.  I doubt the current executive wants to do it. 

 

 

Well I'm officially confused. I realize that townships have powers (though limited compared to municipalities), but as far as I understand, townships exist by default. The areas that are Olmsted Township and Chagrin Falls Township have been such pretty much since Ohio was divided up along these lines 200 years ago. These townships and all others were purposely excluded from the incorporation process which turned other area lands into either villages or cities.

 

I'm not sure if there's any precedent, but if an area decided to forgo its municipality status, it seems that it would simply go back to be a legal township.

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^ You are correct. If an area is not a village or a city, it is part of a township. The city of East Cleveland is part of what used to be East Cleveland Township. All but two (Olmsted & Chagrin Falls) townships in Cuyahoga County are defunct since they've become part of incorporated territory.

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Yeah, townships in Ohio still exist underneath the municipality as a "paper township" even though the township government is abolished as soon as the township is annexed or incorporated. I think Ohio is the only state that does it like this, and honestly I still don't fully understand it.

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Well I'm officially confused. I realize that townships have powers (though limited compared to municipalities), but as far as I understand, townships exist by default.

 

Oops. I wrongly thought things changed under the new county charter. You are correct. And thus unincorporation is not an option apparently, since EC wouldn't be any better off as a township.

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Talked to Gary Norton today, briefly though because he was with his family. He mentioned that the merger progress was going slow, as expected and within a year and a half it can/should be on the ballot. He mentioned as well that he feels that it has a lot of support.

 

Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

 

 

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Today in East Cleveland Ludicrousness

Posted By Vince Grzegorek vgrzegorek@clevescene.com> on Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 11:50 am

Via Peggy Gallek at the East Cleveland city building, where every penny is literally and desperately needed and no threat, no matter how unfounded, is beyond uttering:

 

http://www.clevescene.com/scene-and-heard/archives/2016/07/28/today-in-east-cleveland-ludicrousness

 

CodoAIBWAAA6mY7.jpg

 

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Even worse, from WKYC:

 

"E CLE Judge William Dawson bans beating victim's family and supporters from entering court. Media only. Ohio courts presumed open. [...] In 25 years, never seen a judge ban public from court. Judge William Dawson just did it in E CLE. Media threatened w removal for objecting."

 

I mean, when the city LOCKED an innocent person in a CLOSET for four days with just milk and made him urinate on himself - and got sued and lost, what do you expect? The city is corrupt from the inside out, and no amount of pandering by the mayor - no matter how true his words may be, will fix the issue. Of course, after the judge awarded the victim $10 million, the city is contesting the ruling.

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If any swamp needs to be drained...

 

Law director calls Tuesday's East Cleveland council meeting illegal, walks out before start

 

Four members of East Cleveland's city council sat stunned after the city's law director, Willa Hemmons, came into the room where Tuesday's meeting was being held before it started, announced it was unlawful, and then left.

 

This was the latest in a conflict between the city's law director and members of council, after council President Nathaniel Martin and Vice President Barbara Thomas appointed two new members of council without Ward 4 Councilwoman Joie Graham. Hemmons says the appointments were illegal because council lacked a quorum.

 

Branch and Earby were appointed to fill vacancies left open by the recall of Mayor Gary Norton and Council President Thomas Wheeler in December. Former council vice president Brandon King is now acting mayor.

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If any swamp needs to be drained...

 

Law director calls Tuesday's East Cleveland council meeting illegal, walks out before start

 

Four members of East Cleveland's city council sat stunned after the city's law director, Willa Hemmons, came into the room where Tuesday's meeting was being held before it started, announced it was unlawful, and then left.

 

This was the latest in a conflict between the city's law director and members of council, after council President Nathaniel Martin and Vice President Barbara Thomas appointed two new members of council without Ward 4 Councilwoman Joie Graham. Hemmons says the appointments were illegal because council lacked a quorum.

 

Branch and Earby were appointed to fill vacancies left open by the recall of Mayor Gary Norton and Council President Thomas Wheeler in December. Former council vice president Brandon King is now acting mayor.

They’d rather drain the much cleaner swimming pool and leave the sewage be.  Norton was probably the best mayor they have had in a long time, certainly better than Onunwor the felon or Brewer the ISIS supporter (really).

 

Who would even consider opening a business there?

 

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^Payday lenders, cell phone providers, fast food chains (the types you would find in a mall food court), drive through liquor stores, salons and barber shops, and Dollar General.  Basically, the types of businesses which thrive in the ghetto. 

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http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/rogue-east-cleveland-cops-framed-dozens-drug-suspects-n736671

 

"Three cops who worked for the city of East Cleveland are in prison. Cases against 22 alleged drug dealers have been dismissed. Authorities are searching for another 21 people who are eligible to have their convictions tossed. On top of those injustices, there is a slim chance that any of them will be fully reimbursed, because the disgraced officers and their former employer don't have the money."

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^With all the other crap EC is experiencing, this is like piling on... How bad can things get there? 

 

btw, where's the annexation proposal these days?

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East Cleveland's main role these days seems to be object lesson for Cleveland:  as bad as your city government is, it could be worse.

 

Ironic that Brewer is now running for Cleveland mayor.

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GE could be getting out of the lighting business; Nela Park's future not clear

By Marcia Pledger, The Plain Dealer

on April 06, 2017 at 8:06 AM, updated April 06, 2017 at 6:21 PM

 

EAST CLEVELAND, Ohio - GE may be pursuing a deal to sell its consumer lighting business, a product that has defined the company since it was founded 125 years ago, according to The Wall Street Journal.

 

The story cites unnamed sources "familiar with the matter" and goes on to say that the commercial lighting business rolled into GE's newer company Current is not part of the sale discussion. Two spokespersons for GE, however, said they do not comment on "rumors or speculation."

 

Speculation of a sale brings questions about what will happen to Nela Park, which is the headquarters for GE's Lighting Division. GE's Nela Park turned 100 in 2013, and is widely known in Cleveland for its holiday lights display.

 

Today, however, the company employs about 300 people for the lighting division in Northeast Ohio. A company spokeswoman said the Nela Park campus houses employees from several GE businesses, as well. Just four years ago, the company employed about 700 people.

 

MORE:

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2017/04/ge_could_be_getting_out_of_the.html

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That's all we need in EC, potentially more abandoned property, this time GE's beautiful, classic and historic campus... A Cleveland-E. Cleveland merger is the only hope for this town.

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On 4/9/2017 at 10:55 PM, KJP said:

GE could be getting out of the lighting business; Nela Park's future not clear

 

 

GE Lighting has been on the market now for about 2 years and there doesn't seem to be a line of buyers at GE's door, although Samsung is one name that has been mentioned. I wonder if it might be in GE's interest to keep it at least for the next five years or so.  Most of the capital investment has been written off by now; not much new capital is required; it IS profitable (according to reports), and it's a reliable source of cash, even if not a lot. The new CEO's style is a small headquarters with the management at the division level. NELA Park fits that philosophy and actually is hiring at the moment - 38 posted job openings. With all the other turmoil at GE these days, Lighting isn't really a problem. 

 

I would feel more encouraged if there were a "final solution" for East Cleveland ready to happen. 

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This is a little dated, but Cleveland Heights and the Cleveland Heights CDC, FutureHeights, are working with East Cleveland and other partners on a study (and hopefully future investment) in the Noble Road neighborhood between Mayfield Road and Euclid Ave.

 

http://heightsobserver.org/read/2018/10/23/noble-road-study-kicks-off-oct-29

 

There is currently a survey being done to ask visitors and residents for their input and it looks like there will be a community meeting at the Cleveland Heights Community Center at 7pm on January 17.

 

http://www.futureheights.org/noble-planning-study-online-survey-is-now-live/

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