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"Occupy Wall Street" Movement

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The Atlantic has an article concerning the wealth gap between average American's and their Congressmen.  I think it is especially true when it comes to how policy is actually created. 

 

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/national/2011/12/congress-wealth-gap/46662/

 

The Wealth Gap Between Congress and Voters Is Growing

 

Both The New York Times and The Washington Post have separate reports today about the widening wealth gap between members of Congress and the people they represent. Almost half of all Congresspeople are millionaires and their median net worth has climbed to $913,000, compared to $100,000 for the rest of America households.

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It's not so much the money as the time needed to run for office.  The only people who can manage this are attorneys who work on a case by case basis and retired business owners.  Even serving would be an interruption in most careers...except lawyers.    This is why attorneys dominate the legislatures and why laws are often written by and for the legal profession.

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It's not so much the money as the time needed to run for office.  The only people who can manage this are attorneys who work on a case by case basis and retired business owners.  Even serving would be an interruption in most careers...except lawyers.    This is why attorneys dominate the legislatures and why laws are often written by and for the legal profession.

 

I'm an attorney, but even I agree with this, at least to a large extent.  There are a few other careers that are not interrupted by terms in public office, however.  Finance is another one, for example, though its alumni tend to move more into appointed positions than elected ones.  And, of course, there is a class of people who have done nothing but seek office almost their entire working lives, often starting with small positions in local politics and working their way up.

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What's so wrong about the concept of lawyers writing laws?  Isn't that prederable?  What's next?  Do you not want a chef cooking your dinner?

 

Attorneys dominate the legislatures because they tend to have a better understanding of the issues that arise in politics, are usually very strong in public speaking and debate, they know the movers and shakers in the community, and are particularly mindful of their appearance.  In summary, the qualities that make you a good lawyer, translate to politics very easily..... at least that would be true of trial lawyers.  Paper pushing attorneys, which actually make up a majority of the profession, not so much.

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What's so wrong about the concept of lawyers writing laws?  Isn't that prederable?  What's next?  Do you not want a chef cooking your dinner?

 

Attorneys dominate the legislatures because they tend to have a better understanding of the issues that arise in politics, are usually very strong in public speaking and debate, they know the movers and shakers in the community, and are particularly mindful of their appearance.  In summary, the qualities that make you a good lawyer, translate to politics very easily..... at least that would be true of trial lawyers.  Paper pushing attorneys, which actually make up a majority of the profession, not so much.

 

The problem is a legislature dominated by the legal profession is inevitably going to have an interest in complicating the law (so more lawyers are needed) and making it more lucrative (opposing tort reform).  It's no different than having large employers (or labor leaders) dominate the writing of labor law.

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So are purely private contracts getting ever longer and more complex because of this attorney conspiracy and not because it serves their client's interests?  I think interested parties pulling at the strings of representatives, the ebb and flow of political power, and prior laws that ended up being ineffective or had unintended consequences (interpretation by the courts/"activist judges") all play a significantly larger role in producing the type of convoluted law you're talking about.

 

This reminded me of Richard Dreyfuss dramatically reading the iTunes EULA: http://www.cnet.com/8301-30976_1-20068778-10348864.html

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The problem is a legislature dominated by the legal profession is inevitably going to have an interest in complicating the law (so more lawyers are needed) and making it more lucrative (opposing tort reform).  It's no different than having large employers (or labor leaders) dominate the writing of labor law.

 

Labor leaders and large employers don't write the labor laws.  That is largely done by the administrative agencies, like SERB, which are normally presided over by experienced attorneys in the field and their general counsel's office.  The vast majority of labor law is found in the OAC, not the ORC, through delegated authority.  The originating legislation is written by the GA and surely with the strong lobbying efforts of those groups you mention.  However, Steve Loomis isn't writing any legislation.  Anything that he proposes was written by Pat D'Angelo or some other labor attorney.

 

Lorretto hits on another reason attorneys transition into politics more frequently than other professions... that being their training to act in a pruely representational capacity and abilitty to be passionate about the desires and needs of those they represent even if they conflict with their own personal feelings

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On the lighter side:

 

OWS Bull Barricades Still Up

 

More than a month after Occupy Wall Street activists were removed from a Manhattan park, the bronze bull where the movement started is still surrounded by police barricades

 

.....the caged bull.  Maybe when they come down some ballerina can stand on the bull as a sort of street theatre thing.

 

The movement seems to be focusing on politicians and the political process now...

 

Occupy Wall Street: How Cash Has Corrupted Congress

 

Here in Dayton we are looking at this move from a congresscritter in a neighboring state....

 

Rep. John Yarmuth Introduces Bipartisan Bill to Get Money Out of Politics

 

Read more: http://www.thestatecolumn.com/kentucky/rep-john-yarmuth-introduces-bipartisan-bill-to-get-money-out-of-politics/#ixzz1hr8H28cG

 

Today, Congressman John Yarmuth (Ky-03) will introduce a Constitutional amendment to get money out of politics by overturning a key provision of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, which opened the floodgates for special-interest influence on elections and in Washington.

 

The amendment, which Yarmuth will introduce alongside Republican Congressman Walter Jones (NC-03), establishes that financial expenditures and in-kind contributions do not qualify as protected speech under the First Amendment....

 

One could get leery about amending the 1st amendment (which would be the right wing spin)  but this does seem like a corrective that doesn't open that corporate personhood can of worms.  And it has both a GOP and DEM as co-sponsors.

 

Since it is so reasonable it could be used to put the heat on politicians, or demonstrate how thoroughly corrupt the system is....which follows Zizeks comments about the one reasonable & doable demand that is also the one demand that cannot be met.....

 

Of course this could be just re-election insurance on the part of the co-sponsors....says cynical ole me.

 

 

 

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One could get leery about amending the 1st amendment (which would be the right wing spin)  but this does seem like a corrective that doesn't open that corporate personhood can of worms.  And it has both a GOP and DEM as co-sponsors.

 

Since it is so reasonable it could be used to put the heat on politicians, or demonstrate how thoroughly corrupt the system is....which follows Zizeks comments about the one reasonable & doable demand that is also the one demand that cannot be met.....

 

Of course this could be just re-election insurance on the part of the co-sponsors....says cynical ole me.

 

Two incumbents.  Well d'uh, one says, but wouldn't efforts to undermine spending on elections or issues tend to favor incumbents?

 

Add term limits to that Amendment, and *maybe* it stands a chance in the states, but it never gets out of Congress.

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Things are bumping along here in Dayton.  Usually we get 20-25 people at the GA...with a larger circle making up of around maybe 50 or so...who attend working group or committee meetings but not always at the GA.  Committees are still doing things.  The one I belong to is the Food Working Group, but keep tabs on the Education committee via FB.

 

 

1. We are going to do an outdoor dance party on Friday night.

 

2. A Food Justice Film Series is on tap for February

 

3. We've got use of an old church in East Dayton as a headquarters meeting/work space

 

4. A member has covened a Dayton Food Movement potluck/action bringing together various people doing things like urban gardening, food banks, etc, starting up a food justice movement.  We are going to be part of this.

 

5. A local guy has offered us the use of his vacant lot next to I-75 as a hi-viz place for demonstrations and direct action stuff.

 

6. A member faciliated a direct action at John Boehners Miami County office.

 

7. Members are doing a fiber art/knitting thing for knitted good to go to charity..this is the Arts & Culture group.

 

8.  We might be doing a benefit film at the Neon...but this was just mentioned.  I forget the name of the movie, but it was one of those politically engaged documentaries that have been coming out.

 

9. "Occupy Urban Ohio":  I'm going to  propose an urbanist/urban policy working group to do stuff around urban affairs issues...sort of the stuff I used to post here & at my blog (some of you who are longtime UO members know this stuff).  But more a pratical, politically-oriented application of that...this is still quesionable though, since not really an interest of the local occupiers, more my own thing.  Might back off from that.

 

One thing that I'm involved in, thats not necessarily Occupy but came out it , is working with a lady from the neighborhood north of Miami Valley Hospital on some sort of neighborhood advocacy planning thing.  I knew of this lady via her own involvement in Occupy Dayton, though she isn't going to meetings anymore.  I would never have done this if not for getting involved with Occupy.

 

This activity  could involve Occupy Dayton via a direction action against slumlords.  But it could be me just facilitating a planning effort with her and her neighborhood group involving a mix or urban ag and infill housing. 

 

 

Since I will probably be leaving Dayton and Ohio by the summer this would be a good farewell.  Interesting that it took this Occupy stuff to get me off my duff and become an activist (outside of gay rights stuff).

 

 

 

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I don't understand why there is not more of a dust up by OWS and the TP over this issue.  It seems like both would easily agree on this one....

 

In a strange and unexpected twist, the Republican leader in the House of Representatives is now blocking progress on a bill that would definitively outlaw insider trading  by federal lawmakers.

 

The Republican sponsor of the bill in the House, Financial Services Chairman Spencer Bachus of Alabama, had scheduled a markup of the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge (STOCK) Act for next week. But on Wednesday, Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia cancelled the markup session.

 

Cantor reportedly said he blocked the bill to give Congress more time to examine the issue. Critics of the move, however, fear that any delay could kill the bill entirely.

 

*  *  *  *  *

 

Studies have shown the investment portfolios of House members and Senators consistently outperform the market by significant degrees, suggesting they are either miraculously bright and lucky investors or using their access to non-public information when trading. Financial experts regard the idea that it is just luck or investing smarts as laughable.

 

http://www.cnbc.com/id/45612773/Why_Is_Eric_Cantor_Blocking_the_Congressional_Insider_Trading_Act

 

 

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I do believe there is common ground btw TP and Ocuppy on the money-in-politics issue.  This goes beyond ideology and is a process reform.  I notice this was a reform proposed by a GOP leader...

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this is as hilarious as it is sad!

 

 

You want to read this 2.800-word email from Sarah Ackerman, an NYU student mad at her professor

 

NATE JONES

 

Published: January 06, 2012 5:33 p.m.

 

Last modified: January 06, 2012 6:22 p.m.

 

Don't want to do a class assignment? Better email the president of your university!

 

That was the thought process of one Sarah Ackerman, an NYU undergraduate taking courses in the university's Social and Cultural Analysis Department. (Full disclosure: This reporter also attended NYU, and took three courses in the SCA department.) During the fall semester, Ackerman's professor Caitlin Zaloom assigned the class to do an ethnographic study of Occupy Wall Street. Ackerman objected to the assignment, on the grounds that she was being "forced" to interview "criminals, drug addicts, mentally ill people, and of course, the few competent, mentally stable people," and a feud was born.

 

The fight culminated in this epic 2,800-word open letter to NYU President John Sexton that Ackerman sent to the entire Social and Cultural Analysis department. You really want to read the whole thing. (We've removed Ackerman's original bolding italicization and underlining. Your eyes will thank us.)

 

read on:

http://www.metro.us/newyork/local/article/1065313--you-want-to-read-this-2-800-word-email-from-sarah-ackerman-an-nyu-student-mad-at-her-professor

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this is as hilarious as it is sad!

 

 

You want to read this 2.800-word email from Sarah Ackerman, an NYU student mad at her professor

 

NATE JONES

 

Published: January 06, 2012 5:33 p.m.

 

Last modified: January 06, 2012 6:22 p.m.

 

Don't want to do a class assignment? Better email the president of your university!

 

That was the thought process of one Sarah Ackerman, an NYU undergraduate taking courses in the university's Social and Cultural Analysis Department. (Full disclosure: This reporter also attended NYU, and took three courses in the SCA department.) During the fall semester, Ackerman's professor Caitlin Zaloom assigned the class to do an ethnographic study of Occupy Wall Street. Ackerman objected to the assignment, on the grounds that she was being "forced" to interview "criminals, drug addicts, mentally ill people, and of course, the few competent, mentally stable people," and a feud was born.

 

The fight culminated in this epic 2,800-word open letter to NYU President John Sexton that Ackerman sent to the entire Social and Cultural Analysis department. You really want to read the whole thing. (We've removed Ackerman's original bolding italicization and underlining. Your eyes will thank us.)

 

read on:

http://www.metro.us/newyork/local/article/1065313--you-want-to-read-this-2-800-word-email-from-sarah-ackerman-an-nyu-student-mad-at-her-professor

 

She may not be the most articulate writer when she's upset, but she's got a point.  The professor should have let her do a study on the Tea Party or something like that.

 

BTW, thanks for the tip.  I posted it on Free Republic.  :evil:

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From the email:

 

Lastly, I have over 1,000 friends on facebook, and if Professor Zaloom does not resign, or is not fired by 9 am tomorrow morning, I will publish every single email exchange we have had, on my facebook account.

 

Wow, talk about attention monger! What ever happened to handling things yourself?

 

but she's got a point.

 

Having not seen the movement, I can't comment if her arguments about its danger are valid. Is it really a scary place filled with drug addicts and rapists?

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no its not thats ridiculous. i walked thru the middle of it a few times at its peak it wasnt unsafe just somewhat grungy.

 

better to consider the source - a student at the most expensive school in the country. why should she have to bother to relate to thoooose people? lol!

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Didn't everyone have someone like this girl in their college experience?  Or was I just lucky to have two?  They really never understand that most of their hurdles are of their own making.

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The professor should have let her do a study on the Tea Party or something like that.

 

How would interviewing bigots and 'christian warriors' be any better or safer than interviewing drug addicts and rapists?  (s/i)

 

From reading her email, I hope the professor spared the protesters of her presence.

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no its not thats ridiculous. i walked thru the middle of it a few times at its peak it wasnt unsafe just somewhat grungy.

 

To you, perhaps....but that's how predator types usually appear to those who aren't their targets.

 

She likely walked around the place looking like she was wondering what had died and was rotting in a corner, and that may have contributed to her reception, but the fact is she was assigned to go somewhere she did not feel safe.  It wasn't a whole lot different from assigning her to go interview crack dealers.

 

If Rush gets ahold of this look out, this is his favorite kind of story.

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Amazingly enough, every other student was able to do the project.

 

Also, I think what makes her look even more like a spoiled, whiny brat is that she did end up conducting the interviews (likely just to "prove" the point that the park was dangerous) but then refused to complete the project.

 

I can see where she could possibly have a valid gripe if she truly did feel unsafe, but based on her email and some of her Facebook posts I've seen people post of hers, I'm pretty sure she went about it in such a way that made no one want to cooperate with her.

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Amazingly enough, every other student was able to do the project.

 

Also, I think what makes her look even more like a spoiled, whiny brat is that she did end up conducting the interviews (likely just to "prove" the point that the park was dangerous) but then refused to complete the project.

 

I can see where she could possibly have a valid gripe if she truly did feel unsafe, but based on her email and some of her Facebook posts I've seen people post of hers, I'm pretty sure she went about it in such a way that made no one want to cooperate with her.

 

It doesn't really matter how she went about it.  Put the shoe on the other foot, if a black student or Muslim student of middle eastern ancestry was asked to attend a tea party rally and interview the participants, and requested an alternate assignment, would you sympathize?

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I can see where she could possibly have a valid gripe if she truly did feel unsafe, but based on her email and some of her Facebook posts I've seen people post of hers, I'm pretty sure she went about it in such a way that made no one want to cooperate with her.

 

That's where she's going to fail with this...unless of course she (or her family) knows enough people to impact the outcome.  Valid concern or not, people need to learn how to reach their object without taking the stance of "don't make me do this or else".

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^^What was it about her outward appearance that would make her a target of hate from the OWS crowd the same way either a black or muslim student might get treated at a TP rally?  Seems like apples and oranges.  To be clear, I don't think it would be 'unsafe' for any such student to attend a TP rally.  Uncomfortable.... probably, but not unsafe.  He/she might get some dirty looks from a few and some comments shouted from the 'peanut gallery', but I highly doubt the general crowd there would allow anything to happen which would place their physical safety in jeopardy.

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A. This email is terribly written.

B. This email is hillarious.

C. For some reason the name Zaloom is funny, like it belongs on Futuruma.

D. I'm surprised she didn't threaten to go to the Onion with this article.

E. I love her ultimatums and threats. Love them!

F. If her goal is to get a job with Fox News, I'd say she's well on her way.

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It doesn't really matter how she went about it.  Put the shoe on the other foot, if a black student or Muslim student of middle eastern ancestry was asked to attend a tea party rally and interview the participants, and requested an alternate assignment, would you sympathize?

 

No, not if they acted like an a$$wipe about it.

 

But this damn right shoe on my left foot is really uncomfortable.  Can I switch it back?

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no its not thats ridiculous. i walked thru the middle of it a few times at its peak it wasnt unsafe just somewhat grungy.

 

To you, perhaps....

 

lol! yes perhaps to me, my spouse, lots of other curious local gawkers, plenty of women, thousands of tourists and lets not forget all her classmates.

 

perhaps she would be better off transfering to phoenix? then she can complain to them to her hearts content all safe in her snuggie.

 

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Another part of the absurdity of the situation is the nature of her demand, at least as far as I could glean from that letter.  She leads with that she went to the university president to try to get the professor forced to resign or fired.  Seriously?!

 

If I were in her position and had a serious belief that inserting myself into a particular crowd would be dangerous to myself personally (maybe a Black Panthers or La Raza rally or something--I'm not even sure what an analogous scenario would be for me), I would speak to the department chair about asking to have someone talk to the professor about perhaps offering an alternative ethnography assignment, not trying to go straight to the university president about getting the professor shown the door.

 

Of course, I see later in the e-mail that she did go to the department chair, who apparently referred her to the dean of the college.  I do wonder what happened there, because that does begin to smack of a bureaucratic run-around with a healthy dose of buck-passing, whereas this does not seem to rise to the level of seriousness that should have needed to be run up the flagpole from the department chair to the college dean, let alone the university president.  This is one of the few points that I think she has going in her favor.

 

Another thing that piqued my curiosity is Ackerman's personal background, and I haven't seen too many sites exploring it.  I don't want to stereotype too much based on her name, school, city, and other factors, but there appears at least some chance that she's Jewish.  There definitely have been reports of anti-Semitic slurs and signs at OWS gatherings--not perhaps truly endemic, but enough to concern people who actually would be targets of such slurs (I shrug them aside as unrepresentative fringe elements of the movement, but that's a lot easier for me to do as a 30-year-old non-practicing-Christian white male a long way from any serious Occupy movement action--there wasn't any Occupy Akron, to the best of my knowledge).

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More fallout from OWS, though I think the Great Recession and related bank bailouts helped...

 

Rising Awareness in Class Divide, Many Point to OWS: Report

 

The Occupy Wall Street movement no longer occupies Wall Street, but the issue of class conflict has captured a growing share of the national consciousness. A new Pew Research Center survey of 2,048 adults finds that about two-thirds of the public (66%) believes there are “very strong” or “strong” conflicts between the rich and the poor—an increase of 19 percentage points since 2009.

 

...advocacy group website, but sourced from the Pew polling center.  66% is a high number.  Note this has went up since the advent of the Great Recession. 

 

 

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| Soldiers for the Cause |

 

13 occupiers from San Diego en route to Washington D.C. to attend Occupy Congress were left stranded in Amarillo, Texas. The bus driver, Donald Ainsworth, locked the occupiers in the bus and called the police to have them removed because of his anti-occupy beliefs. The police apologized but had to remove the activists because of Greyhound’s policy that allows bus drivers to remove anyone for any reason.

 

This sort of political discrimination cannot stand. Please voice your opinion by calling their customer service line at (214) 849-8966, Monday – Friday from 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m., Central time zone. You can also send them a message on Twitter @greyhound or by filling out their customer service complaint form by clicking here.

 

http://soldiersforthecause.org/2012/01/15/san-diego-occupiers-stranded-in-texas-by-greyhound-anti-occupy-bus-driver/

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Well, as some of you may know, I checked in on the Seattle OWM this fall aon a Sunday night.  Stayed for about an hour, very interesintg. 

 

 

I tried to do so again recently. 

 

Can't find 'em anywhere!

 

Looks like this thing is done.

 

 

If you can't keep Lefties fired up in Seattle there really is no hope.

 

TEdolph

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I thought of that too, but why lock them in if they simply refused to de-board?

 

Greyhound will sweat this much more from a PR standpoint, but the protesters may have something actionable here beyond false imprisonment.  IIRC, there are special considerations under the law which apply to common carriers and hotels.

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On the surface that's false imprisonment, but the details seem kinda fishy.  Most likely they refused to leave the bus when asked.

 

Bars have been known to do this when people refuse to leave.  It's so they can't simply refuse to leave, be belligerent about it, and then bail when the cops are on the way.

 

There's no way this policy is going to pass legal muster. 

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What if there were a fire or a fight or some other kind of emergency on the bus, and they couldn't get out. No way Greyhound waived those kinds of liabilities with tickets.

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Yeah, I figured he was basically doing a citizen's arrest after the passengers freaked out (I know I would if someone tried to kick me off my cross country bus in Amarillo). 

 

I bet GH has a policy not to lock people in unless the driver believes the people he's locking in there pose a threat to himself or other customers.  As long as he didn't walk away from the bus or ignore an emergency or not act when presented with information that would make detaining them in such a way dangerous (medical conditions come to mind) it won't be that big of a deal.  (All this ignoring what Hts mentioned with common carrier/hotel like law because I'm unfamiliar with it)

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I think Hts may have something there with the common carrier rules.  I don't know if political beliefs are actually a protected category under those laws the way race and sex are, but I'm guessing they actually are.  After all, what if these people had simply been going to a state Democratic Party convention and the bus driver ordered them off the bus (and then locked them inside when they refused) for that reason?  Whatever the law is, it will either protect all political beliefs or none; there is no way that it can pick and choose and say that you can kick people off the bus for "extreme" political views but not for "mainstream" political views or any such impossible-to-police distinction.

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'They took my place!' Single dad trying to take back home occupied by OWS

 

By CANDICE M. GIOVE

 

Last Updated: 1:33 PM, January 15, 2012

 

Posted: 1:03 AM, January 15, 2012

 

They’re occupying his home.

 

Occupy Wall Street protesters announced with great fanfare last month that they moved a homeless family into a “foreclosed” Brooklyn home — even though they knew the house belonged to a struggling single father desperately trying to renegotiate his mortgage, The Post has learned.

 

 

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/ows_home_invasion_z9ApqDP6Q0boFviq8CjvAL#ixzz1jeX3orGS

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http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/klyn_pol_supporter_flip_flops_on_Pt6THF9XMmgk89vVXlPiOO

 

?Councilman Charles Barron, one of Occupy Wall Street’s top political supporters, is yanking the welcome mat.

 

In a bizarre about-face, the East New York Democrat now says that occupiers should not squat in a vacant house in his Brooklyn neighborhood — which The Post exposed last week as being owned by a struggling single dad.

 

“The bottom line is that they have to leave,” said Barron."

 

The story's gaining ground, even if only the Post is covering it right now.

 

The fact is, a story can't be 100% judged by its initial source anymore.  Drudge broke the Lewinsky matter, Free Republic the forged Sixty Minutes memos.

 

 

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I hear OWS supporters in South Carolina "glitter-bombed" Rick Santorum.  Now THAT is funny

 

Yeah, kinda.  But only if it would be equally funny to do something like that to Obama with "red tape".  :)

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