Jump to content
The_Cincinnati_Kid

Cincinnati: CUF / Corryville: Development and News

Recommended Posts

The Angiulli's have some renderings of their vision of Short Vine (at least from charlton to corry) on the walls of Martino's... mostly looks like renovated buildings with decent streetscaping. Nothing as drastic as downing the whole block....

 

Do you by chance have said rendering or know if its online somewhere?  I had heard the plan to demo everything, and am glad that that's not what seems to be going on right now.

 

I'd be happy if the 80s stuff comes down, shame that garage supposedly isn't usable, as it probably could have provided the parking for any new development allowing developers to spend less and (hopefully) up quality of design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martino's does have renderings up on the wall (I snapped a few pics, but do not have them on me).  They look nice.

 

It all seemed to be renovating the facades and re-doing the street with brick not pavement. I think much of the renovated office space will be in collaboration with UC/P&G for their innovation center concept. They have a construction management office set up in one of the buildings with all of the drawings and specs etc... a couple of the buildings on the martinos side as well as the bogarts side have been basically stripped down and gutted.  I am not sure of the timeline but things seem to be progressing and demolition does not seem to be their intent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Cincinnati Restaurant topic:

 

Firehouse on Short Vine to become Ladder 19

09/17/13 at 2:09pm by Polly Campbell

 

Short Vine, the stretch of Vine Street in Corryville a few blocks from the east side of UC, is the next Cincinnati neighborhood to get a serious makeover. A new streetscape project, construction of new residential units, and a strong  influx of new businesses is transforming the area best known as the home of Bogart’s.

 

Among those new businesses is a restaurant and bar called  Ladder 19,  which will open in the old firehouse that  was the home of Zino’s  decades ago.

 

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/dining/2013/09/17/firehouse-on-short-vine-to-become-ladder-19/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Cincinnati Restaurant topic:

 

Firehouse on Short Vine to become Ladder 19

09/17/13 at 2:09pm by Polly Campbell

 

Short Vine, the stretch of Vine Street in Corryville a few blocks from the east side of UC, is the next Cincinnati neighborhood to get a serious makeover. A new streetscape project, construction of new residential units, and a strong  influx of new businesses is transforming the area best known as the home of Bogart’s.

 

Among those new businesses is a restaurant and bar called  Ladder 19,  which will open in the old firehouse that  was the home of Zino’s  decades ago.

 

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/dining/2013/09/17/firehouse-on-short-vine-to-become-ladder-19/

 

I wonder if it will stay true to the character of Short Vine and include a nostalgic fire pole that will ultimately double as a stripper pole for drunk 19 year olds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short Vine makeover takes another step

Apartment building opens with full house

Sep. 23, 2013

Written by Cindi Andrews

 

 

The rebirth of Uptown’s Short Vine Street as a place to live and eat will take another step forward Tuesday with the official opening of Views on Vine.

 

The $20 million project, by Uptown Rental Properties, includes 104 one- to three-bedroom apartments above 17,000 square feet of street-level retail just east of the University of Cincinnati. The headliner, a new Taste of Belgium restaurant location, will open in two weeks.

 

“What’s occurring is a renaissance,” said Dan Schimberg, president of Uptown Rental Properties, which has already built several other apartment/retail projects in the five-block stretch.

 

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130923/BIZ/309230118/Short-Vine-makeover-takes-another-step?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<b>New restaurant, bar project planned for Short Vine: EXCLUSIVE

October 21, 2013

Tom Demeropolis | Courier</b>

 

 

Dan Schimberg’s vision for Short Vine just keeps getting bigger. Schimberg is president of Uptown Rental Properties LLC, which owns, manages and develops residential rental units across Cincinnati. “This is the hottest up and coming business district in the city,” Schimberg said.

 

And Schimberg isn’t just saying that. In recent years, Short Vine has been booming, adding a number of new restaurants, such as Taste of Belgium and Mio’s Pizzeria. And Uptown Rental Properties, with partner North American Properties, has built a number of new apartments in the area. Views on Vine opened earlier this year, and their next apartment project, which will add 166 apartments on Euclid Avenue, is a $30 million project. By 2015, a total of 1,000 more people will be living on Short Vine, just east of the University of Cincinnati main campus.

 

Schimberg’s latest acquisition is a large shopping center right in the heart of Short Vine. An affiliate of Uptown Rental Properties purchased the Colonnade at Corryville for more than $1.5 million. The property is located at 2718 Vine St.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2013/10/21/new-restaurant-bar-project-planned.html

 

This is very interesting.  He's moving all clients out, and will do a "couple" million dollar renovation to the entire property. Removing the dated 90's era sculpture thing and renovating all storefronts.  He wants to attract bars and restaurants and will renovate the garage. I'm pretty surprised by this actually.  This 1 story late 80's/early 90's development is ripe for a teardown and rebuild with multi story housing.  He says he'll have more details in a few weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad to see that shopping center get updated, the whole place screamed 1990, all it needed was something in hot pink ;)

 

I hope there will be residential there too, as long as the market can bear it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Beginning in December, new streetscapes will be added along Short Vine. The streetscapes will bring a bit of nostalgia to the area, and Short Vine will look like it did in the 1800s—think cobblestone streets, rolling curbs and antique streetlamps. Changes will be made to parking as well, including efforts to preserve on-street parking, and additional parking for the public and residents. Sidewalks will also be widened for outdoor dining."

 

I have not noticed any work start, have you guys noticed the upgrades starting?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La Rosa's should either scuttle or renovate their short vine location... it might be their worst franchise in the city. With the amount of decent pizza restaurants in the area, I don't know how they compete up there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During last week's special session on the Central Parkway bike lane, Michael Moore mentioned something about turning Short Vine into a "festival street" where there'd be no curbs and pedestrians would have equal rights as cars. Has anybody heard more details on this proposal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Short Vine would be an ideal candidate for this kind of project. Close proximity to campus but with limited thru-traffic. A reconfigured street would could bring a big increase in retail and foot traffic. And it would be a great venue for special events, festivals, markets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't aware Martino's, Dive Bar, Island Frydays, Whole Nine Yards, The Cupboard, Mike's Music, Saturday's, Cincy Steak and lemonade, Mt. Olive Market, the numerous tattoo parlors and beauty salons, Alabama Que, Daniel's Pub, The 86 Club, Staggerlee's, and the Corryville Public Library were all chains.

 

Also, most of the chains opening up are regional (Taste of Belgium, Mio's, Donato's, etc). The older ones like Papa John's and Domino's have been there for a long time.

 

And I won't comment on the music comment because that's just dumb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During last week's special session on the Central Parkway bike lane, Michael Moore mentioned something about turning Short Vine into a "festival street" where there'd be no curbs and pedestrians would have equal rights as cars. Has anybody heard more details on this proposal?

 

I heard that years ago, glad its moving forward. They cut down all the trees on that street as well so it looks like something is starting soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't aware Martino's, Dive Bar, Island Frydays, Whole Nine Yards, The Cupboard, Mike's Music, Saturday's, Cincy Steak and lemonade, Mt. Olive Market, the numerous tattoo parlors and beauty salons, Alabama Que, Daniel's Pub, The 86 Club, Staggerlee's, and the Corryville Public Library were all chains.

 

Also, most of the chains opening up are regional (Taste of Belgium, Mio's, Donato's, etc). The older ones like Papa John's and Domino's have been there for a long time.

 

You forgot about the prosthetic leg guy -- not a chain. 

 

I remember when the "festival arches" that are there now were installed, around 1992.  That's also when the little shopping center with the parking garage was built.  That attempt to yuppify Short Vine ended in shambles, as the crowds attracted by Bogart's, etc., were so large and uproarious (Slayer, Ministry, etc.) that people seeking to maintain a respectable reputation didn't go to Short Vine.  The high point of the absurdity were BW3's complaints that the Bogart's crowd was hurting their business, then everyone else complaining that BW3's 10-cent Tuesdays were destroying their business.  And they were -- 10-cent wing night drew literally 1,000+ people who rode sport bikes and loitered on that strip.  The clash of cultures was amazing, like a few blocks of the Sunset Strip transplanted to the Midwest. 

 

The only question is will this current effort neuter Short Vine once and for all? 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it's the perfect spot for such a project, and will be even nicer w/ streetcar tracks running through it.

 

Great environment for urban tailgating for UC games...as opposed to a parking lot built over Burnet Woods, which a vocal segment of the Bearcat fanbase seems to want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During last week's special session on the Central Parkway bike lane, Michael Moore mentioned something about turning Short Vine into a "festival street" where there'd be no curbs and pedestrians would have equal rights as cars. Has anybody heard more details on this proposal?

 

It doesn't sound like that's what's happening. The sidewalks will be widened and utilities will be put underground, but it will not become a "festival street" (if a lack of curbs is a defining characteristic of such a street).

 

http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/dote/news/short-vine-streetscape-improvement/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that they're installing bollards implies that it will be easy to close the street down for events and festivals. It would have been nice to have a curbless design (similar to what's been done on Georgia Street in Indianapolis, but that's extremely expensive and I imagine unfeasible with just City dollars). Overall, it sounds like it'll be a big improvement. The utility undergrounding alone will make a dramatic difference on the aesthetics of the street.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point I think no one is considering the Streetcar for Short Vine.  Rather, keeping the entire streetcar on Jefferson.  I'm fine with that, as the streetcar would move even more slowly on Shortvine and separating the north and south tracks by 580 feet is a bit silly. Downtown they're separated by about 490 feet, which is really around the maximum you would want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point I think no one is considering the Streetcar for Short Vine.  Rather, keeping the entire streetcar on Jefferson.  I'm fine with that, as the streetcar would move even more slowly on Shortvine and separating the north and south tracks by 580 feet is a bit silly. Downtown they're separated by about 490 feet, which is really around the maximum you would want.

 

If one direction is on Short Vine, I'd expect both directions to be.

 

Development potential is far higher (less walkshed sunk into UC). Vine is obviously far more pedestrian friendly. I'm not sure about the effect on speed, but walking distance to more destinations is cut and the appeal of walking somewhere from/to the stops is increased. Remember this is a streetcar, not LRT (any sacrifice in speed would be far less than that of inefficiently winding around the CBD). Overall, Vine is far better IMO. Especially if University Plaza is utilized, which is really a golden opportunity for the city to make a crappy space into a good one (or at least push it in a better direction) while simultaneously streamlining the streetcar route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Festival streets and streetcars don't go well together. If the plan had been to have both directions on Short vine that would be one thing- but every image I've ever seen showed one direction on Jefferson and one direction on Vine.  I've heard Uptown wants to have it closed every friday night in the fall and spring. That's a lot of streetcar not operating if it's on Vine. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There would have to be a bit of a balance, but I don't buy that festival streets and streetcars don't work well together, because I've seen them work pretty well in Europe. It's possible designers would have to come up with a way to subtly (and/or perhaps not so subtly) say "don't hang out on the streetcar tracks," but that's certainly doable without scrapping the festival street spirit. Put the tracks and stops in the middle of the road so it's just one condensed strip to avoid standing on. Put some yellow textured paving on the sides to denote caution. Stencil "do not stand on tracks" between the tracks if necessary. Maybe give the track bed a few inches of elevation (with gentle "curbs" that don't pose a problem for wheelchairs, etc.). I don't know, study best practices in similar spaces elsewhere.

 

Certainly ceasing streetcar operations on Friday nights would be out of the question, but if the street is crowded and the driver has to slow down and ding-ding a bit on his way through, that's acceptable on Friday nights IMO -- it's not like there will be a ton of people hurrying to work, and it gives streetcar riders something fun and lively to look at. The street can be closed off to auto traffic and not streetcars. Yes, it precludes setting up a stage across the centerline of the road every Friday. So what? Work with the space available, of which there is plenty. If people on the tracks is a problem on Fridays, temporary barricades could be set up at intervals to clearly mark the trackbed as somewhere not to stand but also easy to cross.

 

Here's a picture from Denver, where there's a lane for a bus but there is clear overall priority to pedestrians on the streetscape:

Denver_1.JPG

I don't think pedestrians are tempted to hang out in that bus lane, but I don't think they feel intimidated by it either. That is how I envision streetcar tracks on Short Vine to be.

 

Here's a much narrower street in Amsterdam, showing shared space w/ pedestrians and a streetcar:

5052266488_479011a613_z.jpg

Short Vine would not have these space constraints, so it should in fact be more functional than this example (where some level of pedestrian-streetcar conflict appears evident).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Uptown Transit District was designed with the streetcar in mind. Metro is planning for a streetcar down Jefferson. Ever since Kroger decided not to work with the idea of accommodating the streetcar on University Plaza property, all signs have been pointing to Jefferson. I think Jefferson makes more sense from a transit planning perspective anyway.

 

I think we need to decide if the ultimate goal is to design the streetcar for transit or for economic development. Obviously they aren't mutually exclusive, but if economic development if the goal then running the streetcar down Findlay, up Vine, across University Plaza, and down Short Vine makes most sense. (As a regular transit rider, I will continue to ride Metro*Plus between the two ends  in this scenario because it's a lot faster and easier.). If a convenient and popular transit route is the goal, then building the Clifton shortcut as John Schneider proposed and running down Jefferson makes more sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not convinced Jefferson is better from a transit planning perspective. I'm only partially talking about development as in raising property values. I am primarily talking about building density and an environment hospitable for transit to thrive and grow. Unless you're coming from UC, you'll be crossing Jefferson to get from anywhere to the southbound stops. Yuck! That's a huge barrier and will greatly damage the usefulness of the line, its impact on the city, and the growth potential of transit that needs a critical mass of development density (TOD) and ridership. Also keep in mind that by virtue of being a streetcar, there is a lean toward economic development over speed. I am all for speed where it makes sense, and for building track that can double as light rail track. But a streetcar through Corryville should absolutely go through the heart of Corryville.

 

Edit: And if the problem is that the private sector isn't being cooperative re: University Plaza, that is what eminent domain is for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short Vine is being torn up and all of the trees are down. That street is not very attractive without the trees. Hopefully they can replace the trees with somewhat mature ones quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short Vine is being torn up and all of the trees are down. That street is not very attractive without the trees. Hopefully they can replace the trees with somewhat mature ones quickly.

 

The sad thing is that business owners don't like trees because it hides their signs, so they lobby to have them chopped down and replaced with something small and spindly, then those gets chopped down when they get too big.  While there's plenty of trees out there that will form a nice high canopy when they're mature, I don't think there's any that won't bush out when they're young. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ You can make the same argument about parking availability, but they'll still bitch and moan like the world is coming to an end. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about run a good business and not worry about the dam sign.

 

Signs are very, very important. Word of mouth and internet help a lot, but if casual customers don't know you're there you're out. We had a location where we were almost all word of mouth and internet with few stroll-ins and it was maddening. Every visit was "planned out" and the customers were all experts that only wanted highly unusual items. Word of mouth without anything else works for auto mechanics, handymen and insurance salesmen but not storefronts. Signs and trees can coexist if the sightlines are right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...