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Airport on verge of world stature

New runway could make it cargo hub

By James Pilcher The Cincinnati Enquirer

 

Two thousand feet of runway may not sound like a lot, but to officials for the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, it could mean the world.  A federal transportation official says the addition could help the airport become a major international air-cargo hub.

 

"We want to put Cincinnati on the map on the international air-cargo scene," said Martin T. Whitmer Jr., deputy chief of staff for U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta.  The expansion "will allow airlines and air-cargo companies to fly large, wide-body aircraft fully loaded with cargo pretty much anywhere in the world."

 

The airport is in the midst of a $252.6 million runway project that includes a 2,000-foot extension to the western end of the east-west runway. The longer runway is scheduled to be operational by the end of this year, and officials say it will allow large jets to reach Eastern Europe and Asia.

 

The longer east-west runway comes at a key time for the airport, which is trying to hold onto one of its main tenants. DHL operates an air-cargo hub locally, but the Brussels-based shipping giant last year purchased the land assets of Airborne Express. That includes the hub and airport in Wilmington, Ohio, about 50 miles northeast of Cincinnati.

 

DHL officials have said they are planning to consolidate the hubs at one location, but have not yet made a decision on which. DHL employs more than 1,800 locally. About 6,500 work at the Wilmington facility, which handles more than five times more volume than the new $220 million Cincinnati DHL hub.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050219/BIZ01/502190344/-1/

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In today's global economy, runways have replaced "Main Street" as the key engines of economic growth in many communities. Several projects begun or completed in the last year will help keep our region at the forefront of this growth.

 

Runway

Our third north-south runway (orange) will allow triple simultaneous takeoffs and landings when it opens in late 2005. This will offer CVG an operating efficiency found at only a handful of airports. The new runway and the runway extension (dark orange) will require nearly two miles of concrete, 150 feet wide and 18 inches thick.

 

Extension

The 2,000-foot extension of the east-west runway (dark orange) will improve the airport's cargo capacity and open the possibility of nonstop passenger flights to Asia and Eastern Europe when completed in 2004. (Planes that fly longer distances are generally large and need longer runways for optimal operation.)

 

DHL

The world's leading international express carrier, DHL, has operated its primary North American hub at CVG since 1984. DHL's $220 million expansion, completed in 2003, allows it to handle more than two million pounds of cargo and air express nightly, doubling its capacity. The 150-acre project also gives DHL enough ramp space to park more than 60 aircraft. DHL's expansion reflects the growing importance of air cargo in the global economy.

 

Taxiways

The airfield projects require seven miles of new aircraft taxiways (light orange) and service roads. In total the airport will move eight million cubic yards of dirt.

 

Roadwork

A two-mile stretch of Route 20 (blue) was relocated to make way for the new 8,000-foot runway. This includes construction of two bridges and a 550-foot tunnel. All of this also entails moving two miles of water, sewer, gas, phone and cable lines. Additionally, the airport has relocated smaller sections of Conner and Limaburg roads.

 

Pipeline

Portions of two fuel pipelines (purple) were routed away from the runway construction zone. The 20- and 26-inch lines carry raw fuel from Texas to Michigan.

 

Firehouse

Included in the cost of the new runway is a second airport firehouse (pink), to be finished in 2004. The FAA requires that emergency crews be able to reach any part of the airfield within three minutes. The new runway is just beyond the reach of this requirement, thus the need to split the airport's emergency crews and equipment between two firehouses.

 

By the Numbers

The $240 million airfield project is sizable, but so are the benefits. By 2005 the average cost of aircraft delay is expected to be nearly $26 per minute of operation. The greater airfield efficiency is expected to save $70 million annually.

i_runway_n.jpg

 

i_termplan_n.gif

 

 

Record Growth

Over the last 10 years our passenger, cargo and flight numbers have more than doubled. CVG's passenger traffic is expected to double yet again over the next 30 years as the region's population swells from 2 million to 2.5 million, and as the national population and personal income levels rise as well.

 

Meeting the Challenge

We plan to meet this demand with a new Terminal Area Master Plan that includes: a single, larger terminal (1) for greater effciency and cost savings, more garage parking (2) and a flexible-use concourse (3) that could handle regional jets and larger aircraft. The dotted line represents existing and proposed sections of the underground train. Concourses A and B (4 and 5) are also shown larger.

 

Staying Flexible

Many components of the plan are designed with a high degree of flexibility, including the single terminal and new concourse. Any and all parts could be built as needed, or not at all, giving us a flexible plan of action for any scenario.

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Airport reaches settlement

Will pay family $2.6M for land

By Bob Driehaus Post staff reporter

 

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport has paid $2.6 million for land -- nearly three times more than the sellers would have previously accepted.  Ending a five-year legal battle with three siblings and their cousin who had asked for about $946,000 for their land in 1999, a settlement reached last week after four days of hearings in Boone County Circuit Court paid the four relatives $2.6 million for 43 acres of land along Conner Road in Hebron.

 

The airport wants the land to build a third north-south runway and extension of its sole east-west runway.  The airport also was ordered to pay $7,200 in court costs incurred by the family's legal team.  The payout continued a trend of airport land purchases that are far in excess of what the airport originally budgeted for land.

 

In October 2003, the airport paid $8.5 million for 80 acres owned by the Marie Conner Family Trust after offering the family trust $2.64 million. The $8.5 million payout, reached after years of legal wrangling, was more than twice the land's appraised value and $4.5 million more than the Conner family would have accepted in 2001.

 

Read full article here:

http://www.cincypost.com/2004/12/11/airp121104.html

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I hope they've changed negotiating teams at CVG...that's just extremely poor judgement.  Not saying I'd have done a better job - paying 37.5% more than you're offering ($22K vs $16K/acre) is significant, and I might have chosen to play hard ball - but I'm a piss-poor negotiator too.

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Runway choices narrowed to four

Options likely to disrupt neighborhoods, or force rerouting of roadways

By James Pilcher and Brenna R. Kelly  Enquirer staff writers

 

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport has cut to four the list of potential sites for a new runway, setting the stage for a 20-year process to meet the anticipated growth of air travel by 2025.

 

While preliminary and subject to input from federal aviation officials and area residents, all options under consideration would have major implications for residential and commercial development in Florence and Boone County. The impact also would be felt beyond Boone because access to national and international flights is a business-growth cornerstone for a region that includes such global companies as Toyota, Procter & Gamble and Chiquita Brands International.

 

A new runway also could create additional noise issues on both sides of the river. Residents living near the airport in Boone and those in western Hamilton County have been vocal in pressing for reduction of noise generated by aircraft at the busy hub airport.

 

Airport officials say that by 2025, the number of flights will grow 66 percent to about 909,000 per year. The number of passengers is expected to almost double to 46 million annually.  The list of runway proposals, trimmed from 12 presented to elected officials and citizens in December, is now in the hands of the Boone County Planning Commission, which is working on its own long-range plan for growth.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050219/BIZ01/502190344/-1/back01

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Instead of rehashing it here, I'll save myself some time and just relay you to jmecklenborg's excellent Cincinnati-Transit.net, where you can read about the politics of it:

 

CVG

Lunken Airport (Cincinnati's municipal airport), and why it wasn't favorable for an international airport

Blue Ash Airport (a general airport), and how it was in the running but fell out of favor

 

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What about the west side of Hamilton county?  I know there is a lot of good land, especially in Crosby Township, where a major airport could have been located.  Was that ever discussed or was it even possible?  If that would have happened, the growth in that area would have been awesome and stayed in the county.  What does everyone think....just throwing things out there.....

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I don't know why Crosby Twp. was never discussed, but you're right.  Crosby or even Harrison Twp. have vast areas of flat or relatively flat land.

 

This is just speculation, but perhaps Crosby Twp. was never considered because of Fernald.  Maybe the government thought with the uranium enriched there that it might be a target.  Then again, did the government ever really consider the possibility that terrorists would use planes as weapons?

 

I wish I was old enough to know the politics of the thing and how it all played out.

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I didn't write those bits on the airports.  Larry Stulz did, and I haven't fact checked them, so if you cite any of that you might get burned.  All these issues are complex and when you're talking about things from 50 years ago few of the people involved are still alive so you can't just call them and ask them to explain or clarify something.  Also, the site will be featured in an article in March 23's Cin Weekly along with...my mug.  So my mysterious identity will finally be revealed!     

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    A few factors in location of the airport:

 

    1. Available land. Crosby was productively farmed; Kentucky was less developed.

    2. Hilltop land. Lunkin was out of the question because it is surrounded by hills. Though not as bad, Crosby is also surrounded by hills. Kentucky had the hilltops.

    3. Location near Ohio River. Fuel comes by river.

 

    The 1948 Metropolitan Master Plan called for 13 airports: Mason, Greenhills, Mt. Healty, Campbell, Blue Ash, Mulberry, Western Hills, Round Bottom, Lunkin, Cherry Grove, Boone County, Taylor Mill, and Cold Springs. It also called for 3 heliports: Elmwood, Downtown, and Belleview, Ky. All of these were supposed to be needed by 1956.

   

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On the other hand, if the airport had been built in Ohio people would complain about airplane noise.  We have Somewhere around the 9th most fights in and out of out airport in the world (I think!), so it gets quite loud

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The 1948 Metropolitan Master Plan called for 13 airports: Mason, Greenhills, Mt. Healty, Campbell, Blue Ash, Mulberry, Western Hills, Round Bottom, Lunkin, Cherry Grove, Boone County, Taylor Mill, and Cold Springs. It also called for 3 heliports: Elmwood, Downtown, and Belleview, Ky. All of these were supposed to be needed by 1956.

 

I have a copy of a variant of that plan. They assumed that aur travel would be more of a commuter/regional thing...and not the huge Hub based/superegional system it is now

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New runway will help travelers, relieve Delta

By James Pilcher Enquirer staff writer

 

The new north/south runway set to open at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in December is expected to make lives easier for travelers, but it also couldn't come at a better time for financially strapped Delta Air Lines.

 

The reduced takeoff/landing delays expected from the $250 million runway could result in efficiencies, primarily in fuel, that could save airlines using Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky more than $206 million in the first year. A runway expansion at Delta's hub in Atlanta, expected to open in 2006, could generate savings of more than $250 million in the first year of operation.

 

Since Delta and its regional subsidiary Comair account for 92 percent of daily flights from the Northern Kentucky airport, the duo stands to benefit the most.  But there are other measures of impact the north-south runway will bring.

 

For passengers. Delay times in takeoffs and landings are expected to drop by more than 5½ minutes to an average of 3½ minutes per flight locally in the first year of operation.

 

Between January and May, Cincinnati ranked ninth among the nation's 33 busiest airports with an on-time arrival rate of 81.47 percent. In January, the worst month of the year so far, 70.8 percent, or nearly 5,300 total flights, were delayed. If the new runway, as expected, gets people moving faster they'll spend less time on the runway and make less-stressful connections at other airports.

 

For the airlines' public images. Delta and Erlanger-based Comair could see their on-time rates improve, helping boost customer relations. In the first quarter, Delta, the nation's third-largest carrier ranked 11th in on-time performance among the 20 biggest airlines with a rate of 75.2 percent. Comair, which operates the most flights locally, had an on-time rate of 74.8 percent during that period, raking 12th.

 

For residents on the flight path. With predictions of an increased number of flights in the coming years, the new runway will allow more planes to access the airport more efficiently. But it also means airport officials, residents in Northern Kentucky and residents of western neighborhoods of Southwest Ohio are likely to keep talking about ways to reduce the noise of jets passing overhead.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050717/NEWS01/507170405/1056/rss02

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^ That would be great because when I flew from Cincinnati to Tokyo in February of this year I flew Northwest out of Detroit because I didn't want to back track to Atlanta and Delta and Northwest co-share miles.  I would have loved to fly into my home cities airport non stop.

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My grandpa lives directly between the two runway approaches on the west side and loves sitting out and watching them land.  He took pilot lessons in 1946-47 at the Mt. Healthy airport.

 

Just back from my first international flight, I now understand why direct and non-stop flights are such a big deal.  Had a free frequent flyer ticket that required one switch in Europe and another here.  Got stuck in Atlanta's airport waiting out that last hurricane for seven hours waiting for the connection.  It's pretty unpleasant when you're jet lagged and already had to deal with two airports and have to wait it out in an airport made ridiculously crowded by all the delayed flights. 

 

Cincinnati's at least an hour closer to Europe and Asia than Atlanta too, btw, and the "new" (it's 10 years old now) Delta terminal is definitely a lot more spacious than almost anywhere.  Also if anyone's flown out of Atlanta recently you've seen all the uniformed troops heading to and from Iraq on leave.  Continental runs at least one plane every day out of there to and from Kuwait City.  Beats the hell out of that two week Atlantic crossing in the belly of a freighter my grandpa still complains about regularly.   

 

 

 

 

 

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Look, up in the sky . . . Feds flying runway tests

By James Pilcher  Enquirer staff writer

 

Residents around the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport might see or hear a strange blue and white plane flying in some unusual locations today over Boone County and western Hamilton County.  But while it will only be a Federal Aviation Administration plane testing takeoff and landing procedures for the new runway under construction here, the operations could provide a preview of what could happen in December.

 

That's when the 8,000-foot north-south strip in western Boone County officially opens, bringing hundreds of flights a day over areas now seeing negligible noise effects.  The changes in the air don't stop there. Airport officials also said:

 

The middle north-south runway will be closing partly later this month so they can tie in taxiways and install new navigational equipment in preparation for the December move. As a result, larger planes will be shifted to the other north-south runway or off to the west - meaning more noise for areas unaccustomed.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050805/NEWS01/508050411/1056/rss02

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^Baker said some residents talk about an eventual buyout of their subdivision, which is only a few years old

 

and our friends thought we were crazy buying a new house nearby an airport

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On the fast track

By Bob Driehaus Post staff reporter

 

X marks the spot that jets need to avoid when trying to touch down at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. The red, illuminated marker warns pilots not to confuse the third north-south runway that's still under construction with its neighbor to the east.

 

The source of the confusion rests with the advanced state of the $250 million project. Harper Co. of Hebron, Ky., finished pouring the 8,000-foot runway about two weeks ago to keep the project on budget and on pace to be completed for a December opening.

 

Ray Schmidt, Harper's superintendent for the project, said a dry summer has helped construction move forward at an accelerated pace. Within a few days, builders won't have to worry about rain because the base layer of the runway's shoulders and taxi-way will be poured, he said.

 

The strip consists of a six-inch layer of base concrete and a stronger 18-inch layer on top. A typical highway, which handles much lighter vehicles than jumbo jets, is typically 10 to 12 inches thick, Schmidt said.  "There's still work to do on the taxiways and concrete and stuff, but we'll have all six inches (base concrete) in place underneath. It looks like a runway now," Schmidt said.

 

Airport spokesman Ted Bushelman said the runway will be fully functional by early October but won't open to regular traffic until late December. The six-week, federally mandated delay is to publish information about the runway's dimensions, lighting and navigational aids in the pilot handbook, he said. The runway dedication is tentatively scheduled for Oct. 6.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050810/NEWS01/508100349

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Portune continues to make himself look more like the putz he is.....

 

Airport keeps runway in master plan

By James Pilcher Enquirer staff writer

 

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport will continue with its master plan that could call for a new runway in 20 years or so, airport officials said Thursday, although its major tenant filed for bankruptcy protection the day before.

 

"We've gotten it (the plan) very close to completion, and it isn't like we have to do what it says if things change for the worse," airport spokesman Ted Bushelman said.

 

Delta Air Lines, the nation's No. 3 carrier, operates its second-largest hub here. The Atlanta-based airline, which filed for bankruptcy Wednesday, accounts for almost 45 percent of the total operating revenue for the airport and controls about 93 percent of the local capacity.

 

Last week, Delta said it was cutting 26 percent of its total flying at the airport Dec. 1, and experts have said those cuts could deepen long term while the airline and its Erlanger-based regional subsidiary, Comair, restructure.

 

The master plan is done in conjunction with a noise study on how to deal with increased noise expected when a new north-south runway opens in December. That $3 million noise study was supposed to be completed this year. But several factors, including the pullout of DHL from its hub here in favor of Wilmington, Ohio, have delayed it until early next year.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050916/BIZ01/509160354/1076/BIZ

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Airport may add more runways

By Bob Driehaus Post staff reporter

 

The new north-south runway at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport won't open until December, but airport officials are already making long-term plans for a fifth and maybe even a sixth runway that are sure to raise the hackles of residents who live beneath their flight paths.

 

Two options are under consideration: an east-west alignment just south of the airport's only east-west runway or a north-south runway east of the airport's three north-south runways.  Landrum & Brown, a Cincinnati airport consulting firm, is conducting tests in conjunction with the airport to determine which alignment would move planes in and out of the airport most quickly.

 

Barbara Schempf, the airport's manager for governmental and technical affairs, said findings from the study might show one option to be much better than the other or for them to have similar benefits and costs.  Should neither be established as the clear favorite, both could be placed in the airport's master plan, she said. They must be in the plan before federal regulators will consider them for approval.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051008/NEWS01/510080342

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Just any FYI, but I was wondering around in the development and planning offices the other night and looked at a bunch of blue prints for the airports future and it was very cool looking.  They are doing away with terminals 1 and 2, expanding terminal 3, moving all the car rental places out near the northside of the new runway (near KY 20), building a new hotel either connected to terminal 3 or just south of KY 236(donaldson).  Oh yeah.. they have a light rail line running east to west by 275 and coming into the airport. 

I'll see if I can get some pictures of it or maybe even a copy to share.

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Just any FYI, but I was wondering around in the development and planning offices the other night and looked at a bunch of blue prints for the airports future and it was very cool looking.  They are doing away with terminals 1 and 2, expanding terminal 3, moving all the car rental places out near the northside of the new runway (near KY 20), building a new hotel either connected to terminal 3 or just south of KY 236(donaldson).  Oh yeah.. they have a light rail line running east to west by 275 and coming into the airport. 

I'll see if I can get some pictures of it or maybe even a copy to share.

 

They can't destroy Terminal 1 & 2 quick enough.  They look like third world Dayton terminals and it would be nice to connect Concourse C with A & B via underground tram.  Any plans...

 

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Just any FYI, but I was wondering around in the development and planning offices the other night and looked at a bunch of blue prints for the airports future and it was very cool looking.  They are doing away with terminals 1 and 2, expanding terminal 3, moving all the car rental places out near the northside of the new runway (near KY 20), building a new hotel either connected to terminal 3 or just south of KY 236(donaldson).  Oh yeah.. they have a light rail line running east to west by 275 and coming into the airport. 

I'll see if I can get some pictures of it or maybe even a copy to share.

 

In the airports master plan, it looks like they will replace terminals 1 & 2 with a new concorse connected to terminal 3 (the new and only main terminal) with an underground train.  You can see some of this on the airport's web site.  The link is below.

 

http://www.cvgairport.com/airport/future3.shtml

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Heres a pic I took with my phone a while back(crappy looking i know).  It shows the expanded terminal 3 with a hotel on the east side.  North of the existing short term parking garages is a new one.

 

 

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Get ready for shift in jet noise

Runway opens Thursday; West Side, Boone brace

By James Pilcher Enquirer staff writer

 

When the new runway at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport opens Thursday morning, aircraft noise will increase on the ground in western Hamilton County and in central Boone County.  And to be sure, some residents will be upset. But airport officials hope that there will be fewer surprises like the ones that occurred 13 years ago when the last new runway opened.

 

"It all depends on the public perception, and, yes, we're expecting phone calls asking what is going on," airport deputy director Dale Huber said. "It's not like we're sitting here thinking that people won't be upset about the activity ... but we hope we've done a better job preparing the public for what is going to happen."

 

After almost four years of construction and expenditures of about $250 million (including an extension to another runway), the 8,000-foot runway is scheduled to open Thursday. Landing lights are to be turned on at 5 a.m., when air-traffic controllers are cleared to use it for normal operations.

 

The airport has justified the new runway by saying air delays had been rising and that the new space will still be needed even though main tenant Delta Air Lines has cut 26 percent of its schedule and air-cargo carrier DHL moved its local hub to Wilmington. They say Delta's new schedule packs more flights into shorter peak periods, possibly increasing congestion.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051221/NEWS01/512210357/1077

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New runway opens to mixed reviews

BY HEIDI FALLON | COMMUNITY PRESS STAFF WRITER

 

Some area residents said the newly opened runway isn't a bother, while others said they're definitely noticing the friendly skies have gotten louder.  The third north-south runway at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport opened last month. It was predicted that communities including Sayler Park, Addyston and sections of Delhi and Green townships would both see and hear more aircraft.

 

Kenton County Airport Board Chairman William T. Robinson said the newest north-south runway was completed through 10 years of hard work.  "This new runway is not just 8,000 feet of concrete and steel. It is a bridge to distant cities and nations -- a bridge to global commerce and prosperity," he said.

 

The airport says 80 percent of the time, aircraft will approach the new runway from the north, impacting Hamilton County communities such as Sayler Park. Aircraft will approach the new runway from the south 20 percent of the time, impacting Boone County communities such as Florence.

 

Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes, a longtime critic of the airport and its runway operations, said he begs to differ.  "The new runway is more likely to turn into a bridge to nowhere unless Delta pulls off a string of financial miracles," Rhodes said.  For Delhi Township resident Mike Vonderahe, he said he'd never been bothered by airplane noise before the new runway opened.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.communitypress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060104/NEWS01/601040560/1074/Local

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"This new runway is not just 8,000 feet of concrete and steel. It is a bridge to distant cities and nations -- a bridge to global commerce and prosperity," he said.

 

 

This newest runway is the shortest at the airport and will be used mainly by regional planes, not the larger 727s and international flights.

 

 

What the hell????

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