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Cincinnati: Before and After Photos of Over-the-Rhine

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 ^ So much progress between 2016 and 2019 on that block, but the thing I keep coming back to is the fact that they installed a new telephone pole on the corner, right in front of B&A. Grrrr....

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19 minutes ago, taestell said:

Pleasant Street, 2018 vs. 2019:

 

26919266997_06dba80ab3_h.jpg

 

46781861115_e836416314_h.jpg

 

What ever happened to those 3cdc condos that were supposed to be built on pleasant (I think that block next to the mural of the guy in the top hat)

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I believe that's their last phase of the 15th and Race project along with the Elm Street Industries building. Now that they finished the current phase I would image something might be seen soonish.

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On 4/25/2019 at 1:55 PM, troeros said:

 

What ever happened to those 3cdc condos that were supposed to be built on pleasant (I think that block next to the mural of the guy in the top hat)

Should take this shot again when Freeport row starts rising.

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2 hours ago, seaswan said:

Where was the stained glass for the church? Surely they didnt make new glass for it

 

It was behind the plywood. Before the plywood was protecting the stained glass, I think they had another layer of glass or plexiglass over them, at least on the 12th Street side.

 

The window on the left side of the front facade might be new, though. You can see louvers peeking above the plywood in the "before" photo. If it isn't new, they must have taken the original out and stored it somewhere when they added the louvers.

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General comment - maybe others have mentioned this, but I'm ambivalent about the exterior changes to many of the buildings I'm seeing in the pictures here. one thing I loved about OTR was the many layers of history on the old buildings - the ghostly painted advertisements, the old signs, the layers of renovations, the sense of being lived in, loved, and lost. What I had hoped for was more organic changes and redevelopment to the neighborhood, something like the old but kept buildings in Queens, or Philadelphia. Instead it feels sterile, powerwashed, disinfected, gentrified for those Lincoln Park Trixies priced out of Chicago. Time will add some of those layers back, and perhaps peel away the monochromatics, but for now, I'm more attracted to OTR north of Liberty than south. This is an aesthetic preference; I don't live in Cincinnati. 

Edited by westerninterloper

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7 minutes ago, westerninterloper said:

General comment - maybe others have mentioned this, but I'm ambivalent about the exterior changes to many of the buildings I'm seeing in the pictures here. one thing I loved about OTR was the many layers of history on the old buildings - the ghostly painted advertisements, the old signs, the layers of renovations, the sense of being lived in, loved, and lost. What I had hoped for was more organic changes and redevelopment to the neighborhood, something like the old but kept buildings in Queens, or Philadelphia. Instead it feels sterile, powerwashed, disinfected, gentrified for those Lincoln Park Trixies priced out of Chicago. Time will add some of those layers back, and perhaps peel away the monochromatics, but for now, I'm more attracted to OTR north of Liberty than south. This is an aesthetic preference; I don't live in Cincinnati. 

 

I think the artworks murals are a problem.  It doesn't matter what is depicted in them - they're all too slick, except for the flying insect, which I like.  They're like Instagram - it doesn't matter what's actually in the picture.  The medium itself is the content.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, westerninterloper said:

General comment - maybe others have mentioned this, but I'm ambivalent about the exterior changes to many of the buildings I'm seeing in the pictures here. one thing I loved about OTR was the many layers of history on the old buildings - the ghostly painted advertisements, the old signs, the layers of renovations, the sense of being lived in, loved, and lost. What I had hoped for was more organic changes and redevelopment to the neighborhood, something like the old but kept buildings in Queens, or Philadelphia. Instead it feels sterile, powerwashed, disinfected, gentrified for those Lincoln Park Trixies priced out of Chicago. Time will add some of those layers back, and perhaps peel away the monochromatics, but for now, I'm more attracted to OTR north of Liberty than south. This is an aesthetic preference; I don't live in Cincinnati. 

 

I think this is mostly the fault of signage regulations and other zoning measures. Historically, busy urban areas have had all sorts of huge and well lit signs - be it 50 years ago or 100 years ago. These signs have the same effect on pedestrians that traffic calming measures have on drivers. You're subconsciously forced to walk slowly, read the signs, and discover your surroundings. The tiny signs that stores are forced to use in OTR have the opposite effect - you can walk down the street and not have any idea what shops are along the way. Try walking down the street pictured below and missing the fact that "Potter's Shoes" is there:

 

uMpq875.jpg

 

Cincinnati_Vine_Street_in_1973.jpg

 

I've also noticed that this seems to only happen in a handful of countries, where urban areas are treated more as a tourist attraction than a livable community. In many places, signage is an integral part of the urban fabric:

 

IMG_2642.jpg

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I think it's more than signs, but I agree that the signs contribute to the chaotic order of those images. Some of the OTR buildings had very rich, complex colors because of the combination of time, pollution, and layering. I even appreciated some of the 'modern' renovations on the buildings - rather than stripping them down to something that would look more at home in a suburban lifestyle center. It's too sterile, too simple, for now at least. I'm really glad the buildings were saved and improved in many cases, but these gut rehabs erase the richness and complexity of the buildings and the urban space. . 

Edited by westerninterloper

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13 minutes ago, jmecklenborg said:

 

I think the artworks murals are a problem.  It doesn't matter what is depicted in them - they're all too slick, except for the flying insect, which I like.  They're like Instagram - it doesn't matter what's actually in the picture.  The medium itself is the content.  

Maybe it's the striking contrast between so much "new" and so much "old". One building by itself wouldn't stand out so much, but having so much of one side of OTR so completely gentrified and the other not makes the southern section all the more jarring. 

Edited by westerninterloper

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A funny sign story - big, bold signs and advertisements are seen as such an integral part of American urban fabric by people overseas that when Disney built their park in Paris, the park's version of Main Street (literally the definition of a Disneyfied sterile urban environment, lol) had a bunch of turn-of-the-century signs added to it to make it seem more "authentically American"  to European audiences. But for some reason, all these nostalgic types who run historic districts in this country prefer the American Main Street USA to the Parisian version, although even Disney himself admitted that no place ever actually existed like that.

 

image.thumb.png.bfd27569ecae88ed93cf6c6889c08cd8.png

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“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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48 minutes ago, westerninterloper said:

I think it's more than signs, but I agree that the signs contribute to the chaotic order of those images. Some of the OTR buildings had very rich, complex colors because of the combination of time, pollution, and layering. I even appreciated some of the 'modern' renovations on the buildings - rather than stripping them down to something that would look more at home in a suburban lifestyle center. It's too sterile, too simple, for now at least. I'm really glad the buildings were saved and improved in many cases, but these gut rehabs erase the richness and complexity of the buildings and the urban space. . 

 

 

I'm really surprised and somewhat saddened by how bonkers 21st century rehabs have gone with painting over brick. That brick made it 100 years without any paint besides signs and people are just going willy-nilly with the paint. We are going to be very sorry we did that. The same goes for interiors as well. It's just more of the attack on rich detail... to steal a political term.

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21 minutes ago, BigDipper 80 said:

A funny sign story - big, bold signs and advertisements are seen as such an integral part of American urban fabric by people overseas that when Disney built their park in Paris, the park's version of Main Street (literally the definition of a Disneyfied sterile urban environment, lol) had a bunch of turn-of-the-century signs added to it to make it seem more "authentically American"  to European audiences. But for some reason, all these nostalgic types who run historic districts in this country prefer the American Main Street USA to the Parisian version, although even Disney himself admitted that no place ever actually existed like that.

 

image.thumb.png.bfd27569ecae88ed93cf6c6889c08cd8.png

 

 

Well, I mean look at it. It's trying to be 1880s Reno, any era Savannah and 1940s New York all at the same time!

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32 minutes ago, GCrites80s said:

 

 

Well, I mean look at it. It's trying to be 1880s Reno, any era Savannah and 1940s New York all at the same time!

Main Street after Plastic Surgery - it's all T @ A, glutes and pecs. Kardashian...Everything is exaggerated, don't you think? The buildings seem anthropomorphic - like the windows would light up into eyes, the awnings bat as eyelashes, and then they start singing. 

Edited by westerninterloper

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^I know at the original one in California, they bought a bunch of old street lamps from St Louis when they were ripping them out and replacing them with electric lights.


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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3 hours ago, BigDipper 80 said:

^I know at the original one in California, they bought a bunch of old street lamps from St Louis when they were ripping them out and replacing them with electric lights.

 

Did they take some of St. Louis's famous bricks as well? 

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On 9/3/2019 at 9:54 PM, GCrites80s said:

 

 

I'm really surprised and somewhat saddened by how bonkers 21st century rehabs have gone with painting over brick. That brick made it 100 years without any paint besides signs and people are just going willy-nilly with the paint. We are going to be very sorry we did that. The same goes for interiors as well. It's just more of the attack on rich detail... to steal a political term.

Eh I mean fair point on the exterior paint, but personally I think it all looks really nice. As for the interiors, most of these buildings were practically falling apart inside, there is only so much that can be preserved

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