Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest ColDayMan

In The World: Egypt

Recommended Posts

Egypt protests: Curfew in cities as army deployed

 

_51006001_cairo_protests_464map.jpg

 

Egypt has extended its curfew to all cities as anti-government demonstrators in Cairo besiege key buildings, including the foreign ministry and the state broadcaster. The headquarters of the governing NDP party has been set ablaze. President Hosni Mubarak, facing the biggest challenge to his authority of his 31 years in power, has ordered the army onto the streets of Cairo.

 

He is due to make a statement, his first since protests began on Tuesday. Across the country, tens of thousands of protesters turned out after Friday prayers and clashed with police. The curfew is now in effect, but live television pictures from Cairo continue to show large crowds on the streets.

 

Full article below:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12311007


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes wonder if there is a world nationality not represented at the Ohio State University in Columbus. :-)

 

Local Egyptians join call for Mubarak to step down

Saturday, January 29, 2011 - 2:51 AM

By Encarnacion Pyle

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Nearly three dozen students, professors and community members rallied outside Ohio State University yesterday in support of the tens of thousands of Egyptians who are calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

 

Holding signs that read "Long live freedom," "Long live democracy" and "Mubarak, game over," the Columbus protesters asked passers-by to stand in solidarity with those demanding change in Egypt.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2011/01/29/local-egyptians-join-call-for-mubarak-to-step-down.html?sid=101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's most worrisome about the crisis in Egypt is what will replace the current regime. If the worst case scenario predictions come to fruition, it will become another Iran courtesy of the Muslim Brotherhood. I wish Obama would come forward immediately and use his bully pulpit and provide some moral clarity to prevent this from happening. Unfortunately he appears to be equivocating like he did with last year's Iranian uprising.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't mind him doing that, but I don't for a second believe it would be for the moral benefit of anyone except those that already live in stable democratic societies.  Sure, the Egyptian street wants to hear American leadership denounce Mubarak but I wouldn't bet on a favorable reaction to being told how they should set up the next government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't mind him doing that, but I don't for a second believe it would be for the moral benefit of anyone except those that already live in stable democratic societies.  Sure, the Egyptian street wants to hear American leadership denounce Mubarak but I wouldn't bet on a favorable reaction to being told how they should set up the next government.

I'm not suggesting anyone tell the Egyptians "how they should set up the next government," but our leadership should clarify--as a matter of defining our future diplomatic relationship with Egypt--what is and what is not acceptable based on our values as a democracy. This at least will form the basis of the terms under which we can reconfigure our foreign policy with new leadership and negotiate accordingly. Ending up with another Iran will spell disaster, and if the Muslim Brotherhood prevails, that's exactly what will happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thinking that Obama can say anything to stop the Muslim Brotherhood from coming to power if that is to be so is a pipe dream, or more likely, you're setting him up so that you can declare that he "failed" in Egypt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't wait for the day when "social media" is no longer a lead story whenever something like this happens.  I don't care how, tell me what the hell they're saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the Muslim Brotherhood of Psychotic Extremists do manage to gain more power in their Parliament, at least the US will stop funding/being blackmailed the $1+billion a year.  A nice little savings there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's most worrisome about the crisis in Egypt is what will replace the current regime. If the worst case scenario predictions come to fruition, it will become another Iran courtesy of the Muslim Brotherhood. I wish Obama would come forward immediately and use his bully pulpit and provide some moral clarity to prevent this from happening. Unfortunately he appears to be equivocating like he did with last year's Iranian uprising.

I wouldn't mind him doing that, but I don't for a second believe it would be for the moral benefit of anyone except those that already live in stable democratic societies. Sure, the Egyptian street wants to hear American leadership denounce Mubarak but I wouldn't bet on a favorable reaction to being told how they should set up the next government.

I'm not suggesting anyone tell the Egyptians "how they should set up the next government," but our leadership should clarify--as a matter of defining our future diplomatic relationship with Egypt--what is and what is not acceptable based on our values as a democracy. This at least will form the basis of the terms under which we can reconfigure our foreign policy with new leadership and negotiate accordingly. Ending up with another Iran will spell disaster, and if the Muslim Brotherhood prevails, that's exactly what will happen.

 

A.  This foreign policy strategy received a "shellacking" at the polls in 2008.

 

B.  You once again fail to understand that there are stark differences between muslim nations and cultures.  You're letting your late night AM radio talk shows put those seeds of fear in your mind again.  Present day Egyptians are not the Iranians of several decades ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MUBARAK UNDER SIEGE

Protests, looting fill Egypt's big cities

Sunday, January 30, 2011 - 2:57 AM

By Hannah Allam, Miret El Naggar and Erika Bolstad

McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

 

CAIRO, Egypt - Tens of thousands of Egyptians broke curfew yesterday to march in Cairo and other major Egyptian cities in a clear message to U.S.-allied President Hosni Mubarak that nothing short of his resignation would end anti-government protests.

 

The police, who were the targets of much of Friday's violence, had vanished from the streets and were replaced by the more popular Egyptian army, which was welcomed by protesters who hugged soldiers and snapped souvenir photos of their tanks.

 

But the absence of the police also created an opening for gangs of thugs who looted private homes and shops and prompted some neighborhoods to form vigilante groups that intercepted cars and kept nonresidents out.

 

Throughout the day, the military showed extraordinary restraint, even allowing some protesters to write graffiti on some tanks: "Down with Mubarak!"  But Egyptians were bracing for a showdown.  The question was, will the army stand with the people or with the Mubarak regime?

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/national_world/stories/2011/01/30/protests-looting-fill-egypts-big-cities.html?sid=101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With all that is going on, this makes me the most sad.  I don't feel bad that US, British, and worldwide museums have "stolen" Egyptian stuff now:

 

"The Egyptian military says it has detained about 50 people who were trying to steal artefacts into the world-famous Egyptian National Museum in central Cairo. Snipers are now stationed on the roof of the building, and dozens of soldiers are patrolling the grounds, according to the Associated Press. Looters broke into the museum on Friday, damaging two mummies and about 75 small artefacts"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12307698

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Listening to CNN over the weekend, they had some "resident expert" on who was actually saying Mubarak had alot of supporters and has made alot of progress for Egypt, indicating their economy was rapidly growing and unemployment was the lowest in years.  Apparently not low enough....  Just interesting to note that all Egyptians are against the guy...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Listening to CNN over the weekend, they had some "resident expert" on who was actually saying Mubarak had alot of supporters and has made alot of progress for Egypt, indicating their economy was rapidly growing and unemployment was the lowest in years.  Apparently not low enough....  Just interesting to note that all Egyptians are against the guy...

 

You got that right, my Ex's mother is Eqyptian and she still stuck on Sadat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's most worrisome about the crisis in Egypt is what will replace the current regime. If the worst case scenario predictions come to fruition, it will become another Iran courtesy of the Muslim Brotherhood. I wish Obama would come forward immediately and use his bully pulpit and provide some moral clarity to prevent this from happening. Unfortunately he appears to be equivocating like he did with last year's Iranian uprising.

 

Moral clarity from the US is the last thing 99% of the rest of the world wants to hear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, at least there's some clarity as to where the US Government stands on this issue

 

Obama Urges Mubarak Not to Run Again

 

WASHINGTON — President Obama has told the embattled president of Egypt, Hosni Mubarak, that he should not run for another term in elections in the fall, effectively withdrawing American support for its closest Arab ally, according to American diplomats in Cairo and Washington

 

This back channel message, authorized directly by Mr. Obama, would appear to tip the administration beyond the delicate balancing act it has performed in the last week — resisting calls for Mr. Mubarak to step down, even as it has called for an “orderly transition” to a more politically open Egypt.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/02/world/middleeast/02transition.html?_r=1&hp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an incredibly interesting time. There seems to be no shortage of political unrest in the world. In addition to Tunisia, and now Egypt, you have Jordan dismissing their cabinet, the Palestinian Authority is apparently making way to allow for elections (which were cancelled in 2009) both as an apparent pre-emptive strike to prevent the same thing happening there. I also just read that the President of Yemen called an emergency meeting of theri parliament and has announced he will not seek re-election in 2013.

 

I'll be interested to see what types of governing bodies are elected after everything settles down.

 

Oh, btw, in non middle east areas, Ireland is also dissolving their parliament and effectively electing a new government the end of this month

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make no mistake...Egypt is the ally, not necessarily Mubarak. I see this as the US attempting to allow Mubarak to exit gracefully, while not burning a bridge with whomever takes over in his place. Mubarak is gone, no matter what else happens. He's lost the people, and the military. We have to start positioning ourself to build an alliance with the next regime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Egypt has a large, fairly educated middle class.  Plus, it is a Sunni culture.  I expect this whole fiasco to end in what's best for Egypt and her citizens.  It really is no one else's business at this point.

 

Now.... Yemen on the other hand.... that could be a real serious issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like things are starting to get violent. So far it's protesters vs supporters of Mubarak. If this keeps up, though, I expect the military will have to step in to settle things down, despite their pledge to not bring harm to the protestors.

 

Clashes Erupt in Cairo Between Mubarak’s Allies and Foes

 

CAIRO — President Obama’s calls for a rapid transition to a new order in Egypt seemed eclipsed on Wednesday as a choreographed surge of thousands of people chanting support for the Egyptian leader, Hosni Mubarak, fought running battles with a larger number of antigovernment protesters in and around Cairo’s Tahrir Square...

 

The two sides traded volleys of rocks and engaged in hand-to-hand fighting. Many were led or carried away with bleeding head wounds. Antigovernment protesters organized themselves into groups, smashing chunks of concrete into smaller projectiles that they hurled at their adversaries. The violence was the most serious since the antigovernment protesters laid claim to Tahrir, or Liberation, Square days ago as they pursued what seemed to be a largely peaceful campaign for Mr. Mubarak’s ouster.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/03/world/middleeast/03egypt.html?_r=1&hp

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Egypt, George W. Bush, and the struggle for liberty

Sunday, January 30, 2011 - The Tygrrrr Express by Eric Golub

 

http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/tygrrrr-express/2011/jan/30/egypt-george-w-bush-and-struggle-liberty/

 

LOS ANGELES — February 1, 2011 — Egypt is on fire. People are protesting in the streets as Hosni Mubarak sees his 30-year power reign shakier than ever. Egyptians are fighting for freedom, and people all across the globe will eventually be forced to accept what American conservatives have known for several years.

 

George W. Bush was right. He still is ‘righter’ than ever.

 

Bush-haters will continue their habit of ignoring facts and evidence. The rest of us know that the events in Egypt are a direct result of his presidency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pro-Mubarak forces clash with protesters

Thursday, February 3, 2011 - 2:56 AM

By Hadeel Al-Shalchi, Associated Press

 

CAIRO - Bursts of gunfire rained into Cairo's Tahrir Square before dawn today, killing at least three anti-government demonstrators among crowds still trying to hold the site after an assault by supporters of President Hosni Mubarak.

 

Protest organizer Mustafa el-Naggar said he saw the bodies of three dead protesters being carried toward an ambulance.  He said the gunfire came from at least three locations off in the distance and that the Egyptian military, which has ringed the square with tank squads for days to try to keep some order, did not intervene.

 

Throughout yesterday, Mubarak supporters charged into the square on horses and camels brandishing whips, while others threw firebombs from rooftops in what appeared to be an orchestrated assault against protesters trying to topple Egypt's leader of 30 years.  Three people died in earlier violence, and 600 were injured.

 

The protesters accused Mubarak's regime of unleashing a force of paid thugs and plainclothes police to crush their unprecedented 9-day-old movement, a day after the 82-year-old president refused to step down before the election.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/national_world/stories/2011/02/03/pro-mubarak-forces-clash-with-protesters.html?sid=101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are obviously Mubarak's cronies. As much as I abhor popular (and Egyptian) Sunni sheik Yusuf Al-Qaradhawi I have to agree that from the logic of a Muslim perspective that such blind adherence to mortal Arab dictators is comparable, as he compared in a recent speech, to idolatry, which he said is even worse than killing a fellow Muslim, which is where I immediately go back to disagreeing with virtually everything he says.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh, I say Obama is doing the best he can in a lose-lose situation for him.  He either goes against our necessary evil ally (democracy causes far too many problems to US interests in that region - see Gaza, Lebanon, Iran, Iraq).  I don't think Israel would be thrilled with the increase in tunneling in weapons should the Brotherhood of Die for Allah and Stone all Women take full control of their governmental branches.

 

And then you have the Egyptian people who are , reasonably from their POW, fighting for a needed change.  That's good for them, and I can see Obama really wanting to support these appropiately motivated protestor - but he also has to look at US interests with everything he does.

 

The fact is that the US doesn't want every country to have a democracy because what's good for them cam be, and is, bad for us.

 

Hard to edit this on a 4 year old iPhone , hope i've made no glaring errors

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what should be remembered sis that this was absolutely a non violent demonstration until Mubarak sent his hired goons to assault the protesters.

 

So when you read "Pro Mubarak allies" it should be interpreted as "thugs 4 hire."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U.S. tries to broker Mubarak's resignation

Friday, February 4, 2011 - 2:51 AM

By Helene Cooper and Mark Landler

The New York Times

 

WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is discussing with Egyptian officials a proposal for President Hosni Mubarak to resign immediately, turning over power to a transitional government headed by Vice President Omar Suleiman with the support of the Egyptian military, administration officials and Arab diplomats said yesterday.

 

Even though Mubarak has balked, officials from both governments are continuing talks about a plan in which Suleiman, backed by Lt. Gen. Sami Enan, chief of the Egyptian armed forces, and Field Marshal Mohamed Tantawi, the defense minister, would immediately begin a process of constitutional reform.

 

Mubarak's insistence on staying will again be tested by large street protests today, which the demonstrators are calling his "day of departure," when they plan to march to the presidential palace.  The military's pledge not to fire on the Egyptian people will be tested as well.

 

The Committee to Protect Journalists said pro-government mobs detained 24 reporters in 24 hours, including representatives of The Washington Post and The New York Times.  Twenty-one journalists were assaulted, including two with Fox News.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatchpolitics.com/live/content/national_world/stories/2011/02/04/copy/u-s-tries-to-broker-mubaraks-resignation.html?adsec=politics&sid=101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hossam Bahgat and Soha Abdelaty are, respectively, executive director and deputy director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights - www.eipr.org

 

What Mubarak must do before he resigns

By Hossam Bahgat and Soha Abdelaty

Saturday, February 5, 2011

 

CAIRO -- As Egyptian citizens and human rights defenders, we have been on the streets here, including in Tahrir Square, since Jan. 25 to demand dignity and freedom for all Egyptians.  There is nothing we want more than an immediate end to the Mubarak era, which has been marred by repression, abuse and injustice.  We are heartened by the international community's shift from demanding "restraint" and "responsiveness" to echoing our call for Hosni Mubarak to step down and for an immediate transition toward democracy.

 

But for a real transition to democracy to begin, Mubarak must not resign until he has signed decrees that, under Egypt's constitution, only a president can issue.  This is not simply a legal technicality; it is, as Nathan Brown recently blogged for ForeignPolicy.com, the only way out of our nation's political crisis.

 

MORE: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/story/2011/02/04/ST2011020405287.html?sid=ST2011020405287

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoopie.  And when 50 million tea party members and conservatives march around DC, demanding Obama gets the f out, then I guess he better go the next day.  Nothing like mob rule  dictating a country's policies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Considering the messes we've made of so much of the world, who are we to judge them and their laws.

 

You support your friends and your country and look at the big picture, none of which Obama seems to be doing here. A lose-lose situation for Obama, granted, but it is not in US interests for Egypt to have so-called free elections.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Egypt, the 'lamestream media' shows its courage and value

By Kathleen Parker, The Washington Post

Sunday, February 6, 2011

 

The turmoil in Egypt has been a lesson in the fragility of a right we so often take for granted: to speak.  It also has been a reminder to those who deride the "lamestream media" as the enemy, traitors and worse that many members of that maligned tribe are also very brave.

 

A list of journalists who have been assaulted, beaten, harassed and arrested in Egypt since demonstrations began would consume the balance of this column.  They include attacks on CNN's Anderson Cooper, as well as reporters and photographers from The Post, Fox News, the New York Times, and numerous other publications and broadcast organizations from around the world.  The attacks have been well organized and strategic, suggesting something more than an organic eruption from the street.  The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), founded in 1981 to protect press freedom and journalists, has added its voice to those asserting that the attacks were arranged by Hosni Mubarak's government.

 

Mohamed Abdel Dayem, CPJ's Middle East and North Africa program coordinator, reported Wednesday that "the Egyptian government is employing a strategy of eliminating witnesses to their actions.  The government has resorted to blanket censorship, intimidation, and today a series of deliberate attacks on journalists carried out by pro-government mobs.  The situation is frightening not only because our colleagues are suffering abuse but because when the press is kept from reporting, we lose an independent source of crucial information."

 

MORE: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/04/AR2011020404218.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Egypt tries to wait out protesters

Protesters react with call for strike

Tuesday, February 8, 2011 - 2:51 AM

By Anthony Shadid, THE NEW YORK TIMES

 

CAIRO - As Egypt's revolt entered its third week, the government of President Hosni Mubarak sought to seize the initiative from protesters still crowding Tahrir Square yesterday, offering a pay raise for government employees.  The administration also announced a date for opening the stock market and projected an air of normalcy in a city reeling only days ago.

 

The confidence, echoed by a state-controlled media that have begun acknowledging the protests after days of propaganda, suggested that both sides think the uprising's vitality may depend on their ability to sway a population still deeply divided over events that represent the most fundamental realignment of politics here in nearly three decades.

 

"Now it feels like Hosni Mubarak is playing a game of who has the longest breath," said Amur el-Etrebi, who joined tens of thousands in Tahrir Square yesterday.

 

After demonstrating an ability to bring hundreds of thousands to downtown Cairo, protest organizers have sought to broaden their movement, acknowledging that simple numbers are not enough to force their demand for Mubarak's departure.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/national_world/stories/2011/02/08/egypt-tries-to-wait-out-protesters.html?sid=101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoopie. And when 50 million tea party members and conservatives march around DC, demanding Obama gets the f out, then I guess he better go the next day. Nothing like mob rule dictating a country's policies.

 

And what were your thoughts on Tiananmen Square?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...