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Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development

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I like the pop-up neighborhood idea. I think each of these blighted neighborhoods needs a pillar of stability in them that can attract businesses, and private investment. Something people want to be near.  Something similar to how the Clinic and UH anchor University Circle, but on a much smaller, neighborhood scale. The question is what those pillars could be?

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I think Kinsman looks so much better from one end to the other (East 55th to East 155th near Lee) than it did in the 80s and 90s during the worst of the crack epidemic. Maybe some of you don't remember that, but I can remember it from 70s because my church was just north of there. Kinsman was a big Jewish neighborhood and my parents had some friends from there who were moving out in the 70s, but many of their businesses stayed until crack took over in the 80s. Sad how we use to run from neighborhoods when they changed, rather than stay and fix things up.

 

Anyway, in the winter of 2010-2011 I drove from downtown to UH's new Ahuja Hospital via Kinsman because I had some time to do it, and I was glad I did. There were lots of problem areas, but no bombed-out buildings with the windows and/or roofs gone, or piles of tire illegally dumped on vacant lots and people coming up to your car when you get stopped at traffic lights. Instead, I saw some vacant lots being tended to, old buildings in distress but attempts were being made to secure them, other old buildings that were fixed up and many new buildings, especially around East 79th and moreso, east of East 93rd. I've driven it several more times since, and seen more progress especially near 79th.

 

So it looks like the fall has stopped, but it's still got a long way to go to become a neighborhood people want to live in. It needs something to give it a hook. Perhaps its proximity to the huge urban gardens east of East 55th and along East 79th is that hook, combined with fresh food grocers providing wholesale and retail food markets and distributors in that area? I recall that being the purpose of Maingate, but I wonder if that could spread east along Kinsman.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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I dunno, this is the most god-awful thing I've seen in a long time. At E. 83rd & Carnegie...

 

DSCF6108.jpg

 

DSCF6104.jpg

 

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DSCF6107.jpg

 

DSCF6109.jpg

 

DSCF6106.jpg

 

DSCF6110.jpg

 

 

Across the street, the Fiarfax neighborhood center is much better

 

DSCF6113.jpg

 

DSCF6114.jpg

 

DSCF6124.jpg

 

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I dunno, this is the most god-awful thing I've seen in a long time. At E. 83rd & Carnegie...

 

DSCF6108.jpg

 

DSCF6104.jpg

 

DSCF6105.jpg

 

DSCF6103.jpg

 

DSCF6107.jpg

 

DSCF6109.jpg

 

DSCF6106.jpg

 

DSCF6110.jpg

 

 

Across the street, the Fiarfax neighborhood center is much better

 

DSCF6113.jpg

 

DSCF6114.jpg

 

DSCF6124.jpg

I'm liking the second building but that Rumi's Market building is just awful and uninspiring. The ball was dropped here, BUT it is better than looking at an abandoned building though.

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It is not yet open.

But I know what you mean. It looks much closer to opening but I suppose it could go into construction-hibernation again, prolonging the arrival of its opening even more.

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Not sure how it's been kept out of the press thus far, but CMHA broke ground this week on their new "solar farm" located adjacent to the new headquarters building on Kinsman.  You can just barely see it as you're heading east up the bridge over the railroad tracks.  Apparently it's going to be several acres of solar panels.

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Yes, the CMHA solar facility will include several areas of solar panels, between 3' and 6' tall.  I'm not sure the exact count, but there are a lot of them and it should make for a very impressive aerial photo when they're all done.

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Think we missed this one ... More than 80 applications from prospective retailers ... in a stretch that I don't think is on many people's radar currently! Between this initiative taking off in a span of just a few months, the urban grazing program next to Quay 55, loft conversions of vacant housing, Asiatown master planning, Superior Ave. streetscape improvements and a ton of public art stuff, I think it may be about time for St. Clair Superior to get its own thread ... Or at least a merger with the Asiatown thread :D

 

Retailers are buying into a popup concept in the old Slovenian neighborhood

By Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

 

More than 80 aspiring merchants have applied to be part of a popup neighborhood along St. Clair Avenue on Cleveland's east side, including hopeful proprietors of a cafe, a confectionery, an interior design firm and a dance studio ...

 

... More available at http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/09/retailers_are_buying_into_a_po.html

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Not sure where to post this!

Cleveland Range will add jobs and expand in Collinwood

Published: Monday, September 17, 2012, 10:00 PM

Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer By Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer

 

A venerable Cleveland maker of commercial ovens is expected to add jobs and grow in strength and stature following an agreement with the City of Cleveland.

 

Following the lead of the finance committee, City Council Monday night approved a package of incentives that helped to convince Manitowoc Foodservice of Wisconsin to make Cleveland the headquarters of its oven manufacturing division.

 

That means new offices and more than 100 new jobs at Cleveland Range, which already employs 260 people at a sprawling complex at 1333 East 179th St. in Collinwood.

 

www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/09/cleveland_range_will_add_jobs.html

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http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2012/crr10-15-2012.pdf

 

Board of Zoning Appeals

October 15, 2012

 

POSTPONED FROM SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

 

10:30

Ward 10

Calendar No. 12-125:

13101 Coit Road

Eugene Miller

33 Notices

 

Ken Marous dba Site HQ, LLC, appeals to erect a 128 foot high ground-mounted wind turbine on an irregular shaped acreage parcel in a B3 General Industry District; and contrary to Section 354A.04(b), the ground mounted wind turbine is proposed at a dis-tance of 90 feet from the property line and 140.8 feet is the minimum setback distance required so that it equals 1.1 times the height of the turbine from all property lines, street right-of-way line and utility line; and the provisions under Section 354A.07, re-quire the following information to be submitted with an application for a ground-mounted wind turbine and accessory structures to demonstrate compliance with Chapter 357A.07:

an elevation drawing showing the proposed wind turbine and all structures and landscaping shown on the required site plan, indicating height, color and materials of the tower, all fencing and other structures;

where lighting is proposed for the turbine, a lighting plan indicating the location, color and intensity of the lighting, both as it will appear in daylight and at night and in-dicating any mechanisms to prevent glare on adjacent properties and streets to shield the lighting from residences, to the maximum extent feasible;

for any wind turbine that exceeds the height limit for buildings on the subject property, a vicinity map showing the property and proposed wind turbine, and the fenc-ing in the context of all property located within a distance from the turbine equal to three times the height of the turbine, and showing within this area, all streets and exist-

ing buildings and significant structures and indicating the residential use of any buildings and property zoned in Residential or Landmark Districts, such map being marked with topographic contours at five foot intervals;

a statement by an engineer licensed in the State of Ohio certifying that the proposed wind tur-bine will meet the noise standard of this ordinance with respect to impacts on properties in nearby Resi-dential zoning districts;

a statement indicating the estimated construction cost of the wind turbine and a statement indi-cating the estimated cost for demolition and removal of the wind turbine;

a performance bond or equivalent financial instrument, if required, sufficient to cover the esti-mated demolition and removal of the wind turbine.(Filed 7-20-12; testimony taken.)

Second postponement taken to have all pertinent parties, including the property owner, to be present for the hearing.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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This is a vacant parcel in Collinwood, across the street from the old Coit Road Fisher Body plant. A residence office? Sounds interesting.......

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2012/10192012/index.php

 

City Planning Commission

Agenda for October 19, 2012

 

Ordinance No. 1085-12(Ward 10/Councilmember Miller): To change the Use District of land on the north side of Coit Road between E. 140th Street and E. 141st Street to Residence Office.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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And in Glenville......

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2012/10192012/index.php

 

City Planning Commission

Agenda for October 19, 2012

 

NE2012-028 – Morning Star Tower Rehabilitation

Project Address: 10600 St. Clair Avenue

Project Representative: Jonathan Cana, Herman Gibans Foder Architects

[Tabled at last meeting.]

 

Morning_Star_01.jpg

 

Morning_Star_06.jpg


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Collinwood's where I'm from. I'm very interested to hear more about this project. Also, do we have a thread for Collinwood projects? I know we have one for Waterloo but I don't think we have one for projects in Collinwood in general (North Collinwood, South Collinwood, Nottingham, & Euclid-Green). With this project, the Euclid Beach Park project that was recently in the news, the Cleveland Range expansion project in Nottingham, and some others, I think Collinwood should get a thread if it doesn't have one currently.

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Pop-up retail center in Cleveland draws interest from the old and new world

Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer By Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer

on November 08, 2012 at 5:00 PM, updated November 08, 2012 at 11:32 PM

 

 

The words "Slovenian Auditorium" are chiseled in stone high above the storefront that will house Yvonne Jones's new business, a hip hop dance studio.

 

She's already met her next-door neighbors, friendly genealogical researchers, who asked nervously about music volume.

 

Jones is a pioneer in an effort to revive a faded retail district with a new generation of shopkeepers. She soon will bring her energy and talents to a trial designed to become permanent, as 10 or so new businesses open in quick succession.

 

"It's going to be all of us. All of us," she said, waving a hand at the vacant storefronts running down St. Clair. "And that's really going to be nice."

 

As it adds shops and galleries to a lonely streetscape, an uncommon business strategy will create a colony of sudden entrepreneurs. The likely camaraderie, Jones and others say, is as enticing as a rent waiver.

 

www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/11/popup_retail_center_in_clevela.html

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This is the sort of plan I really like, and I'm glad the CDC and Urban League are supporting it.  Maybe the tide is finally turning for Cleveland's commercial districts.

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Cleveland VA to open outpatient surgery center on Superior Avenue

By Brian Albrecht

Cleveland Plain Dealer

11-19-12

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center is hoping to establish a 10,000 square-foot outpatient ambulatory surgery center on Superior Avenue between East 89th and East 90th Streets.

 

The VA is seeking Cleveland City Planning Commission approval of the one-story new building, and the project will be presented to the commission Dec. 7.

The center will be built by the Downing Construction Co. and leased to the VA for 10 years for $1.4 million, according to Mike Downing, company president.

 

Downing said the center conceivably could be completed and open by late 2013, and speculated that it could prompt future neighborhood development.

 

"That area needs some vitalization, so hopefully it could get some additional business spin-offs," he said.

 

 

Hopefully that last part is right, and this project does act as an anchor for the neighborhood. quite a bit of abandoned lots along Superior...

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"vitalization"?

 

Like that area has never been vital or active before? Suggestion: "Revitalization."


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Good news.  I stopped into the Wade Park facility the other week and it was absolutely packed.  I am not sure the transition from closing Brecksville is going all that well, even with the added space provided by the new construction.

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Yeah, I'm going to boldly project zero spillover benefit from a one-story outpatient clinic and its large surface parking lot.  That sort of language is just another box to check off whenever a developer is talking about his or her project.

 

FYI, I revived the VA project thread yesterday to discuss the consolidation.  I had missed the scathing Inspector General Report when it came out a couple months ago: http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,13900.msg650575.html#new.

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Pop up shops, Slovenian Carnival (kurentovanje), Hope-Sketch arts project...there is lots going on in St. Clair Superior...and not just in AsiaTown!!

 

st. clair superior celebrates new retailers, upcoming public art project

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 06, 2012

 

This summer, the St. Clair Superior Development Corporation launched an initiative called "Retail Ready" with the objective of filling a slew of vacant storefronts along St. Clair Avenue....

 

Although the project has taken longer than anticipated, it has sparked a lot of fresh interest in the area, says St. Clair Superior Executive Director Michael Fleming. The faded strip also recently celebrated a new tenant, Nx Dance Studio, which opened its doors on Sunday with a room full of line dancers and music spilling out into the street. Three additional retailers are expected to open early next year.

 

Now, thanks to a $25,375 grant awarded by Cuyahoga Arts and Culture, St. Clair Superior is gearing up for a major public art project this summer that will beautify the street between E. 62nd and Addison. "Hope-Sketch: St. Clair Avenue Reimagined" will create large-scale public art with community input...

 

http://freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/stclairsuperiorhope120612.aspx

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Three vacant properties between East 55th and East 49th, north of Central Avenue, appear to be the subject of a potential development. Note the first four items on BZA's Dec. 10 agenda....

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2012/crr12-10-2012.pdf


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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looks good! im very glad that area should have some improvements and development on the way... would be a huge step up if even a fraction of that is accomplished.

 

oh, and i was beginning to wonder if the city even knew what TOD was!

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Yep, it knows what TOD is. Sadly many properties around Rapid stations are polluted, entangled with liens, or lack subsidies to clean them or make them economical in light of our city's low rental rates (UC and possibly downtown excepted).


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2012/crr12-31-2012.pdf

 

Board of Zoning Appeals

 

December 31, 2012

9:30

Ward 4

Calendar No. 12-208:

3552 East 131st Street

Kenneth Johnson

26 Notices

 

Cleveland Metropolitan School District, owner, and the City of Cleveland, prospective purchaser, appeal to construct a new fire station on acreage located between Oakfield and Benham Avenues on the west side of East 131st Street in a B1 Two-Family District; subject to the provisions for a Two-Family District under Section 337.03 and by refer-ence, as regulated in a One-Family District, per Section 337.02(f)(2), the proposed build-ing is subject to the review and approval of the Board of Zoning Appeals after public no-tice and hearing, to determine if adequate yard spaces and other safeguards to preserve the character of the neighborhood are provided and if in the judgment of the Board such building and use are appropriately located and designed and will meet a community need without adversely affecting the neighborhood. (Filed 12-4-12)


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Drawings of the above......

 

Fire_Sta56_10.jpg

 

Fire_Sta56_11.jpg

 

This was the site of Charles Dickens Elementary School....

 

Charles_Dickens.jpg

 

Recently demolished.....

Fire_Sta56_09.jpg


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Good news on the eastern front...Cedar Extension on Cedar and E 24th has received funding to be torn down and rebuilt! Heritage View over around Kinsman and E 71 and Bohn Tower downtown are also to get upgraded...

 

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2013/01/cmha_awarded_17_million_to_upg.html#incart_river_default

No it's not it just creates a never ending cycle if we want the surrounding downtown area to thrive and the income level to rise why aren't we building ACTUAL TOWNHOMES! Why does the west side get nice homes while the east gets new projects? I get tired of seeing the same type of "development" occur. It's just like how outside of UC or downtown the largest east side development was a jail.

 

C'mon now how about equal gentrification on both sides we all know the West side already has more stable neighborhoods that's why they only lost 9% of their pop. while the east side lost 22%. How about building homes/apartments that will attract new people to make things even?

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There will come a day when the Cleveland market will support "actual townhomes" in that area...now is not the time. There will always be people on public assistance. I would much rather the population be stabilized by tearing down the 1930's projects and replacing them with new buildings. As you can see in the population trends in this specific neighborhood, it has stabilized and is even growing. The reason they focus on the west side is they can make the ROI that they decide is needed. As downtown continues to fill in and Tremont/Ohio City/Detroit Shoreway/Edgewater/University Circle build out, we will see these other neighborhoods take off. We are years away though unless there is some major job growth.

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No new public housing is being built. This is to modernize/replace what already exists.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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No new public housing is being built. This is to modernize/replace what already exists.

 

Actually what's going back at Cedar Estates will be less dense that what was built in the 1930's.  City Architecture recently did a master plan for this area, I haven't seen it yet though.  The initial goal was to put some market rate apartments mixed in with the subsidized public housing, similar to what's done at Tremont Pointe.  Some thought the area could support it, since it's on the fringe of downtown, sandwiched between CSU & Tri-C.  We'll see.

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Actually what's going back at Cedar Estates will be less dense that what was built in the 1930's.  City Architecture recently did a master plan for this area, I haven't seen it yet though.  The initial goal was to put some market rate apartments mixed in with the subsidized public housing, similar to what's done at Tremont Pointe.  Some thought the area could support it, since it's on the fringe of downtown, sandwiched between CSU & Tri-C.  We'll see.

 

Cool. I liked what they did at Tremont Pointe.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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C'mon now how about equal gentrification on both sides we all know the West side already has more stable neighborhoods that's why they only lost 9% of their pop. while the east side lost 22%. How about building homes/apartments that will attract new people to make things even?

 

Who are you directing this message toward?  City leaders?  You think "if they build it, people will come" applies to new construction on the abandoned east side?  East side neighborhoods are so decimated they lack basic demographics to support things like a grocery store or solid neighborhood establishments.  Building some new townhome developments is not going to change this.  Plenty of wasteland on the west side too, check out the Stockyard areas, W25th to W65th south of I-90... 

 

Good leadership is spending tax dollars in a manner that produces returns.  Some of those east side neighborhoods need to go into the landbank and sit for a decade or so, focus on rejuvenating what areas are already on solid footing and can prosper.  If that's Tremont/Detroit Shoreway/Ohio City and University Circle, so be it.

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No new public housing is being built. This is to modernize/replace what already exists.

 

Actually what's going back at Cedar Estates will be less dense that what was built in the 1930's.  City Architecture recently did a master plan for this area, I haven't seen it yet though.  The initial goal was to put some market rate apartments mixed in with the subsidized public housing, similar to what's done at Tremont Pointe.  Some thought the area could support it, since it's on the fringe of downtown, sandwiched between CSU & Tri-C.  We'll see.

If that's the case then I support it but just having public housing outright is bad in my eyes but that's just me being from the east side and tired of seeing the same old thing over and over. If a different approach like this is happening though I support it

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Then again, some of those east side areas have become so rural that they're about as close to starting afresh as a developer would be with an exurban development far out in Geauga County or Ashtabula County which also have little supportive infrastructure and services. The only difference is there's a stigma associated with building inside the doughnut hole. So you start by building an oasis with some services available there. Then you build another. And another. And soon you have a viable urban community again.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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^except the surrounding population is still in decline.  Things need to stabilize a bit before it makes sense to rebuild.  Big picture, the west side areas like Detroit Shoreway & Edgewater are still losing residents, albeit nowhere near as fast as the east side.

 

The east side has seen a substantial amount of reinvestment too in the last ten years or so.  All the new apartments and single family homes in Hough, all the new single family homes built under Jane Campbell between Central & Community College...

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^except the surrounding population is still in decline.  Things need to stabilize a bit before it makes sense to rebuild.  Big picture, the west side areas like Detroit Shoreway & Edgewater are still losing residents, albeit nowhere near as fast as the east side.

 

The east side has seen a substantial amount of reinvestment too in the last ten years or so.  All the new apartments and single family homes in Hough, all the new single family homes built under Jane Campbell between Central & Community College...

 

And I believe my approach is how you stabilize it -- one small oasis at a time. It's how you defeat the chicken-egg dilemma. Stabilization cannot be done with the existing housing stock, most of which is too far gone to refurbish.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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^except the surrounding population is still in decline.  Things need to stabilize a bit before it makes sense to rebuild.  Big picture, the west side areas like Detroit Shoreway & Edgewater are still losing residents, albeit nowhere near as fast as the east side.

 

The east side has seen a substantial amount of reinvestment too in the last ten years or so.  All the new apartments and single family homes in Hough, all the new single family homes built under Jane Campbell between Central & Community College...

 

I mentioned arbor village before, but mclovin seems to think is public housing or that the people who live there are low income. 

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Then again, some of those east side areas have become so rural that they're about as close to starting afresh as a developer would be with an exurban development far out in Geauga County or Ashtabula County which also have little supportive infrastructure and services. The only difference is there's a stigma associated with building inside the doughnut hole. So you start by building an oasis with some services available there. Then you build another. And another. And soon you have a viable urban community again.

 

This is the only way it can work, though "soon" may be a stretch.  One more factor, you have to have the political will to protect and police your oasis aggresively, at times stretching the law vis a vis "loitering" and the like. 

 

Also, to resist any of the lingering resentment towards "gentrification".  With the exception of Little Italy and possibly Shaker Square and Asiatown, your options over on the east side are "gentrified" and "blighted".

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^except the surrounding population is still in decline.  Things need to stabilize a bit before it makes sense to rebuild.  Big picture, the west side areas like Detroit Shoreway & Edgewater are still losing residents, albeit nowhere near as fast as the east side.

 

The east side has seen a substantial amount of reinvestment too in the last ten years or so.  All the new apartments and single family homes in Hough, all the new single family homes built under Jane Campbell between Central & Community College...

 

I mentioned arbor village before, but mclovin seems to think is public housing or that the people who live there are low income.

Yes I did and after I found out what it really was I took back my statement and got on board with it.

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^except the surrounding population is still in decline.  Things need to stabilize a bit before it makes sense to rebuild.  Big picture, the west side areas like Detroit Shoreway & Edgewater are still losing residents, albeit nowhere near as fast as the east side.

 

The east side has seen a substantial amount of reinvestment too in the last ten years or so.  All the new apartments and single family homes in Hough, all the new single family homes built under Jane Campbell between Central & Community College...

 

I mentioned arbor village before, but mclovin seems to think is public housing or that the people who live there are low income.

Yes I did and after I found out what it really was I took back my statement and got on board with it.

 

toldyouso_zps370dc851.jpg

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q & a: kevin robinette, architect on imperial ave. memorial project

Douglas J. Guth | Thursday, January 17, 2013

 

It's been more than three years since the bodies of 11 women were discovered at 12205 Imperial Avenue in Cleveland. The home of convicted serial killer Anthony Sowell has since been demolished, but the empty lot where the property stood is a grim and ugly reminder of the violence that took place there.

 

Over the past year, the Imperial Coalition, a grassroots task force led by religious, city and community leaders, has been working with residents and relatives of victims on ways to reclaim the neighborhood. Talk has centered around the possibility of designing and building an "exterior space" at the Imperial Avenue parcel, an effort assisted by the Cleveland chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

 

 

http://www.freshwatercleveland.com/features/kevinrobinette011713.aspx

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I still think its patently absurd to essentially say we should abandon the east side for another decade, as if that'll solve the problem magically. Those who know the real history of the city of Cleveland know that abandonment of the east side is one of the reasons the East Side is in the shape that it's in now. I'd agree that there are some East Side areas that are in worse shape than others (Glenville, Kinsman, Central, etc.) and as a result, will take longer to fix. But then there are other neighborhoods on the East Side (South Collinwood, half of Hough, Saint Clair-Superior) that really only need a clear plan and a concentrated effort to redevelop. And there are other neighborhoods (like Euclid Park and East Blvd) that are beaming with potential and can be points of real strength. So not only is the idea to essentially let the East Side rot insulting, but in certain cases, it's unnecessary. I think we cannot forget that we are talking about real people here. Real people live in these neighborhoods. Someone mentioned about how some in Cleveland are suspicious of gentrification, but this is why. People know when you don't give a damn about them, and they respond in kind. And from a couple of the commenters here, it sure seemed like that's the attitude. This is why native Clevelanders don't trust redevelopment supporters like us.

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This is the only way it can work, though "soon" may be a stretch.  One more factor, you have to have the political will to protect and police your oasis aggresively, at times stretching the law vis a vis "loitering" and the like. 

 

Also, to resist any of the lingering resentment towards "gentrification".  With the exception of Little Italy and possibly Shaker Square and Asiatown, your options over on the east side are "gentrified" and "blighted".

 

Unless the new and old property owners agree to assess a fee on themselves for localized security, cops walking the beat, trash pickup/beautification, etc. as has been done in Ohio City, Gordon Square, Kamms Corners, UC, Shaker Square and other non-downtown neighborhoods. Each oasis can be managed hyper-locally or if there is enough of a critical mass, then the CDC could oversee it.

 

Those who know the real history of the city of Cleveland know that abandonment of the east side is one of the reasons the East Side is in the shape that it's in now.

 

And those who know the history of urban policies by the State of Ohio over the past 50 years or so know that a neighborhood often has to die (or at least go on life support) before it can be revitalized. Only then can you tap funding resources to start over. In Ohio, no property can compete with a large/clean/green/lien-free piece of land at the urban fringe -- unless it is in the urban core. So in Ohio, a neighborhood has to die, have its obsolete/decayed structures be demolished, the vacated lands cleaned by nature or man, all the liens removed, the multitude of small properties assembled into much-larger properties until they are ready to compete with developable properties that exist at urban fringe.

 

Some neighborhoods can be saved before they fail, or at least their decline slowed way down by keeping the housing stock and commercial districts fresh and physically competitive. But until we stop dragging the urban fringe farther and farther out from the geographic center of metro areas that haven't grown in population in 50 years, we're just forcing the chairs to move around on the deck of a motionless ship.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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This is the only way it can work, though "soon" may be a stretch.  One more factor, you have to have the political will to protect and police your oasis aggresively, at times stretching the law vis a vis "loitering" and the like. 

 

Also, to resist any of the lingering resentment towards "gentrification".  With the exception of Little Italy and possibly Shaker Square and Asiatown, your options over on the east side are "gentrified" and "blighted".

 

Unless the new and old property owners agree to assess a fee on themselves for localized security, cops walking the beat, trash pickup/beautification, etc. as has been done in Ohio City, Gordon Square, Kamms Corners, UC, Shaker Square and other non-downtown neighborhoods. Each oasis can be managed hyper-locally or if there is enough of a critical mass, then the CDC could oversee it.

 

Those who know the real history of the city of Cleveland know that abandonment of the east side is one of the reasons the East Side is in the shape that it's in now.

 

And those who know the history of urban policies by the State of Ohio over the past 50 years or so know that a neighborhood often has to die (or at least go on life support) before it can be revitalized. Only then can you tap funding resources to start over. In Ohio, no property can compete with a large/clean/green/lien-free piece of land at the urban fringe -- unless it is in the urban core. So in Ohio, a neighborhood has to die, have its obsolete/decayed structures be demolished, the vacated lands cleaned by nature or man, all the liens removed, the multitude of small properties assembled into much-larger properties until they are ready to compete with developable properties that exist at urban fringe.

 

Some neighborhoods can be saved before they fail, or at least their decline slowed way down by keeping the housing stock and commercial districts fresh and physically competitive. But until we stop dragging the urban fringe farther and farther out from the geographic center of metro areas that haven't grown in population in 50 years, we're just forcing the chairs to move around on the deck of a motionless ship.

 

I don't disagree with anything you said. In fact, something you touched on is part of my point. The east side, by and large, IS on life support already. That process you talked about has already taken place in most of the east side. Collinwood is really one of the only somewhat stable neighborhoods on the east side (not counting University Circle). Now is the time to REBUILD, not to be content with continued decline in perpetuity.

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And waiting for Columbus to make things easier for us isn't the answer either. I don't believe (and I'm not sure most believe either) that we've done all we can to stabilize the east side neighborhoods that can be stabilized. In fact, I'm sure of it. If that wasn't the case, then I'd be more inclined to agree that our hands are tied. But I don't believe that's the case, not by a long shot.

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