Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest KJP

Cleveland: East Side Neighborhood Development

Recommended Posts

Hey, at least they're putting it on the sidewalk. But there's a Family Dollar only a block away. Wow.

And that's the exact reason I don't care for this being built I wish something better would be there...

 

Like what?  A Starbucks?

No but something that isn't a dollar store because one is a block away but I didn't know dollar stores boomed until I saw the story KJP posted so I guess it makes sense.  :|

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still, I do think the two stores are awfully close to each other. But it's a free country, and if someone wants to start a new business at such a disadvantage and increase the risk of turning one or both of the stores into a vacancy someday, that's their call. Too bad the neighborhood has to suffer for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just happy they're building it up to the street.  If all the dollar stores and drugstores did that, I wouldn't find them nearly so objectionable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just happy they're building it up to the street.  If all the dollar stores and drugstores did that, I wouldn't find them nearly so objectionable.

 

Now if we could just get them to build residential above! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still, I do think the two stores are awfully close to each other. But it's a free country, and if someone wants to start a new business at such a disadvantage and increase the risk of turning one or both of the stores into a vacancy someday, that's their call. Too bad the neighborhood has to suffer for it.

 

Just about every type of store does this for some reason- drug stores, discount superstores, groceries, hardware stores, they all locate as close as possible to the competition.  Makes no sense to anyone but them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never understood it either. Must be hubris, with one company thinking they are so much better than the competition that they can push them out of a good location. I for one don't distinguish between CVS and Walgreen's, or Family Dollar and Dollar General. Ultimately a neighborhood can only support one store, so at least one of them is going to close.

 

The South Broadway neighborhood also probably can't support two Dollar stores. The new Dollar General is probably the better located of the two, but I would have preferred that it be at the corner of Harvard and Broadway, which was once one of those mini-downtowns that Cleveland used to have all over the place at major streetcar intersections. And there was once a busy Pennsylvania Railroad station here too....

 

Cleveland-PRRHarvard-BroadwaySta-19.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stores like this and drug stores like to congregate at high visibility intersections where they can benefit from the traffic in either direction. They also prefer stand alone stores. Drugstores prefer this because it allows them room for their drive-thru pharmacies.

 

I think certain neighborhoods can support more than one store. Competition is good right? Maybe not the one the new dollar store is going in, but maybe the passing traffic changes that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a rule that all of our main streets have to be fronted with fences?  If so, time to get rid of it.  Can't tell if they're trying to keep wolves out or sheep in.  Or people out or people in.  Either way, it's inappropriate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^If you look very, very closely at the rendering, you can see that the fence keeps no one in and it keeps no one out.  It is merely decorative and there is nothing wrong with that, even if it isn't to your taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, there is something wrong with giving main street pedestrians the fence treatment while the entrance faces a parking lot.  Pedestrian-oriented design is not a matter of taste.  This is better than the typical dollar store, but we're not quite there yet.  The improvement is noted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The door is on the sidewalk and the parking is to the side which probably makes people feel more secure in that neighborhood than if the parking lot was in back. So I don't believe the fence deters from pedestrianism here as long as those are real windows facing the street and not decorative. But I am concerned the fence could be function as a net for discarded receipts, bags, wrappers, and other trash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Collinwood, off East 152nd Street, U.S. Metal Forms and Tubes, Inc. owns one commercial property and three residential properties which it is seeking to demolish.......

 

14607 Velour Avenue

14610 Ingalton Avenue

14612 Ingalton Avenue

14614 Ingalton Avenue

 

The company's properties were condemned by the city and the owner cited, which the company is appealing to get more time to be able to demolish the structures. See:

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/bbs/agenda/2012/AGENDA06062012.pdf

 

It appears that U.S. Metal Forms and Tubes, Inc. is seeking to develop a former industrial site at or near 1145 Galewood Ave. This structure has housed multiple users recently as the Collinwood Enterprise Center, a business incubator. I am not able to find more details about this project or the company, except that it is based in Beltsville, MD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the choice neighborhoods section at CMHA website.  Hopefully the demolition and redevelopment of the rest of the older project style buildings will come out of this.  The Central neighborhood has had quite a transformation and actually grew last census. With the new focus on the Forgotten Triangle area hopefully we will see the same in that area as well.

 

"The Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority (CMHA) has been awarded a $300,000 Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The planning grant will focus on the Central neighborhood adjacent to Cleveland’s downtown....Once completed, the plan will become the guiding document for the revitalization of the public housing units in the Cedar/Central Community, while simultaneously directing the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood and positive outcomes for families. The goal of this Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grant is to employ a comprehensive approach to neighborhood transformation."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was driving down Woodland yesterday and saw a sign saying E 115 and Woodland townhomes coming soon.  I searched CMHA website and found nothing...same with google. It was dark so I didn't really see the renderings or who was building it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This link mentions that the Town-homes will be a CMHA project..... :-(

 

Councilwoman Mitchell is also supporting and focusing on community and economic development in ward 6 in order to enhance the neighborhood to its full potential. She is fulfilling this objective by partnering to create economic benefits for Ward 6 and city residents by supporting projects such as the St. Luke’s Manor, Doubletree Hotel and Cleveland Metropolitan Housing Association’s East 115th-Woodland Townhome and Woodhill Homes Community Center projects.

 

http://www.clevelandcitycouncil.org/ward-6.aspx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2012/crr08-06-2012.pdf

 

Board of Zoning Appeals

August 6, 2012

9:30

Ward 6

Calendar No. 12-120:

11525-29 Buckeye Road

Mamie Mitchel

19 Notices

 

Cleveland Housing Network, owner, appeals to construct a four-story apartment building on a 240’ x 187.90’ corner parcel in a C1 Local Retail Business District; contrary to Sec-tion 355.04(b) a maximum gross floor area of 40,290 square feet is proposed and 20,234 is allowed; and by the provisions under Section 349.04(a) one accessory off-street parking space is required per dwelling and 23 spaces are provided contrary to the requirement for 65; and subject to Sections 352.08 through 352.11, a landscape plan/schedule is re-quired with a minimum 6 feet wide landscaping strip that provides fifty percent year-round opacity where the parking lot fronts on East 116th Street; and a building height of 40 feet is proposed contrary to Section 353.01(b) that limits the height to 35 feet; and a front yard of 25 feet is required where 10 feet is proposed contrary to Section 357.04 in the Cleveland Codified Ordinances. (Filed 7-12-12)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This looks like the best place to post this...

 

Cleveland's old Slovenian neighborhood hopes a popup spurt sparks a revival

Published: Monday, August 13, 2012, 6:00 AM    Updated: Monday, August 13, 2012, 4:02 PM

By Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer

 

In the old Slovenian neighborhood of Cleveland, empty buildings with pedigree hunker down in patient silence, as if waiting for the good times to roll again on St. Clair Avenue.

 

You can almost hear the shuttered Croatian Bookstore at East 64th Street whispering "shhh" to the nearby Slovenian National Home, where the dance floor still thrums to polka parties but where most of the storefronts -- like much of the block -- stand empty and still.

 

Neighborhood planners hope a bold business strategy infuses new vigor into a ghostly shopping district and rather quickly. Like, all at once.

The St. Clair Superior Development Corp., working with the Urban League of Greater Cleveland, will take a crack at creating a popup neighborhood with permanence. Offering merchants free rent and other enticements, the partners plan to welcome 10 businesses simultaneously next month on a two-block stretch of St. Clair and let capitalism work its magic.

 

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/08/clevelands_old_slovenian_neigh.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another business in that same area.....

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2012/crr08-27-2012.pdf

 

 

Board of Zoning Appeals

August 27, 2012

9:30

Ward 7

Calendar No. 12-135:

6321 St. Clair Avenue

TJ Dow

16 Notices

 

Jessica Harris, owner, appeals for an expansion of use to include entertainment (ballroom) and rental apartments in an existing three-story building, located on a 100’ x 134.32’ corner lot in a C1 Local Retail Business District, where the proposed entertainment use, a ballroom, is not permitted under the limitations in Section 343.01 and first permitted in a General Retail Business District, provided it is distanced not less than 500 feet of a residential district, a school, public library, church, playground, public or non-profit recreation center or from another enter-tainment center in accordance with Section 343.11(b)(2)(L); and a maximum lot area coverage of 10,000 square feet is proposed contrary to Section 357.04(a) and 6,716 square feet that is allowed; and no front yard is pro-posed contrary to Section 357.04(a) and a required depth of 26 feet and there is no rear yard proposed where a depth of 20 feet is required under Section 357.08(b)(2); and 11 parking spaces are proposed contrary to Section 349.04(e) and a required 68 off-street spaces; no landscaping is proposed along East 64th Street where the park-ing abuts the street and a 6’ wide landscaped strip is required according to Section 352.11 in the Cleveland Codi-fied Ordinances. (Filed 7-31-12)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Old remaining Garden Valley Housing Projects (how many other cities had projects with the same name?) are getting demolished finally.  Not sure when anything will go back in the place, but it should improve the looks of the area nonetheless.  They've been vacant for 3 years now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears to be the alley between 65th/66th and Quimby and Lexington, katty corner to the League Park ticket building.  That block has plenty of room for new housing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can multiple pop-ups turn around blighted strip in st. clair superior?

Thursday, August 16, 2012

 

Pop-up shops, business-plan competitions and storefront incubators have been successful at attracting new stores to trendy neighborhoods like Detroit Shoreway and Tremont. But can they turn around a blighted retail district and help sprout small businesses in a down-at-the-heels east side neighborhood?

 

That's the question Michael Fleming, Executive Director of the St. Clair Superior Development Corporation (SCSDC), is determined to answer in the affirmative ...

 

... More available at http://www.freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/stclairpopuphood081612.aspx

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pop-up shops, business-plan competitions and storefront incubators have been successful at attracting new stores to trendy neighborhoods like Detroit Shoreway and Tremont. But can they turn around a blighted retail district and help sprout small businesses in a down-at-the-heels east side neighborhood?

 

People sure do have short memories. Or they just can't see how neighborhoods can/do change. Detroit-Shoreway and Tremont were pretty dumpy places not too long ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is devoted to news and discussion about the redevelopment of mostly African-American neighborhoods, primarily on the east-side. It seems that many developments, including those of a large-scale, have been overlooked on this board.

 

If there are already threads about a particular development project, please continue to post articles in those threads. If not, feel free to post them here rather than in the random developments thread.

 

THANK YOU for creating this thread.

 

$30+ million in construction projects will be taking place in Central and Kinsman in 2011:

http://www.bbcdevelopment.org/2011/01/bbcs-major-construction-projects-in-2011/

 

That doesn't include the redevelopment of the Garden Valley Estates (now called Heritage View Homes).

 

BBC development on the east side? Lol

 

On a side note, I read a whimsical feature in the PD the other day about bringing retail to Mt. Pleasant... Kinsman has amazing urban fabric and didn't seem too rough during the day when I was lost looking for Shaker Square last month...but I didn't get the sense of neighborhood potential. Is this legit or just spinning the wheels for grants?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^It's hard to imagine much of a retail revival on Kinsman, IMHO, as the population density and spending power drops.  Those trends are unlikely to change anytime soon.  A good comp might be Buckeye Road, which has a large suburban-style shopping center, and then a bunch of street-front retail housing churches, social services, non-profits, day care centers, but relatively few private businesses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kinsman totally sucks from 55th to 93rd.  I drive it everyday.  The CMHA development looks nice but that's it.  That greenhouse facility being built near 55th is interesting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the pop-up neighborhood idea. I think each of these blighted neighborhoods needs a pillar of stability in them that can attract businesses, and private investment. Something people want to be near.  Something similar to how the Clinic and UH anchor University Circle, but on a much smaller, neighborhood scale. The question is what those pillars could be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Kinsman looks so much better from one end to the other (East 55th to East 155th near Lee) than it did in the 80s and 90s during the worst of the crack epidemic. Maybe some of you don't remember that, but I can remember it from 70s because my church was just north of there. Kinsman was a big Jewish neighborhood and my parents had some friends from there who were moving out in the 70s, but many of their businesses stayed until crack took over in the 80s. Sad how we use to run from neighborhoods when they changed, rather than stay and fix things up.

 

Anyway, in the winter of 2010-2011 I drove from downtown to UH's new Ahuja Hospital via Kinsman because I had some time to do it, and I was glad I did. There were lots of problem areas, but no bombed-out buildings with the windows and/or roofs gone, or piles of tire illegally dumped on vacant lots and people coming up to your car when you get stopped at traffic lights. Instead, I saw some vacant lots being tended to, old buildings in distress but attempts were being made to secure them, other old buildings that were fixed up and many new buildings, especially around East 79th and moreso, east of East 93rd. I've driven it several more times since, and seen more progress especially near 79th.

 

So it looks like the fall has stopped, but it's still got a long way to go to become a neighborhood people want to live in. It needs something to give it a hook. Perhaps its proximity to the huge urban gardens east of East 55th and along East 79th is that hook, combined with fresh food grocers providing wholesale and retail food markets and distributors in that area? I recall that being the purpose of Maingate, but I wonder if that could spread east along Kinsman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I dunno, this is the most god-awful thing I've seen in a long time. At E. 83rd & Carnegie...

 

DSCF6108.jpg

 

DSCF6104.jpg

 

DSCF6105.jpg

 

DSCF6103.jpg

 

DSCF6107.jpg

 

DSCF6109.jpg

 

DSCF6106.jpg

 

DSCF6110.jpg

 

 

Across the street, the Fiarfax neighborhood center is much better

 

DSCF6113.jpg

 

DSCF6114.jpg

 

DSCF6124.jpg

I'm liking the second building but that Rumi's Market building is just awful and uninspiring. The ball was dropped here, BUT it is better than looking at an abandoned building though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how it's been kept out of the press thus far, but CMHA broke ground this week on their new "solar farm" located adjacent to the new headquarters building on Kinsman.  You can just barely see it as you're heading east up the bridge over the railroad tracks.  Apparently it's going to be several acres of solar panels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the CMHA solar facility will include several areas of solar panels, between 3' and 6' tall.  I'm not sure the exact count, but there are a lot of them and it should make for a very impressive aerial photo when they're all done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think we missed this one ... More than 80 applications from prospective retailers ... in a stretch that I don't think is on many people's radar currently! Between this initiative taking off in a span of just a few months, the urban grazing program next to Quay 55, loft conversions of vacant housing, Asiatown master planning, Superior Ave. streetscape improvements and a ton of public art stuff, I think it may be about time for St. Clair Superior to get its own thread ... Or at least a merger with the Asiatown thread :D

 

Retailers are buying into a popup concept in the old Slovenian neighborhood

By Robert L. Smith, The Plain Dealer

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

 

More than 80 aspiring merchants have applied to be part of a popup neighborhood along St. Clair Avenue on Cleveland's east side, including hopeful proprietors of a cafe, a confectionery, an interior design firm and a dance studio ...

 

... More available at http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/09/retailers_are_buying_into_a_po.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×