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the fairly new city ferry service is expanding again:

 

 

NYC TRANSPORTATION

 

NYC FERRY

NYC Ferry will launch service to Staten Island, Coney Island

 

The ferry service will hit all five boroughs by 2020

 

By Amy Plitt@plitter  Jan 10, 2019, 12:54pm EST

 

 

 

 

more:

 

https://ny.curbed.com/2019/1/10/18177078/nyc-ferry-transportation-staten-island-coney-island

 

Announcement_Map_1024x1024.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, mrnyc said:

nj gov murphy wants the pa to bump up replacing the newark airport airtrain.

 

it opened in 1996 with a lifespan of 25yrs. 

estimated cost is $2.1B — only maintenance was in the pa’s 10yr plan:

 

https://www.nj.com/politics/2019/01/murphy-calls-for-a-brand-new-2b-airtrain-at-newark-airport.html?outputType=amp

Every government infrastructure project should include maintenance estimates in their cost for new infrastructure.  That's why Ohio is so over-extended in its ability to maintain all the lane-miles of roadway and bridges.

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13 hours ago, mrnyc said:

get ready for omny.

 

mta is rolling out its metrocard replacement system starting next week.

 

it will be on 4/5/6 stations between grand central and atlantic yards.

 

metrocards dont go away until 2023:

 

https://nypost.com/2019/02/22/mta-to-begin-pilot-for-metrocard-replacement-next-week/

 

I hate this. The next thing you know we'll have to get a chip implanted in our foreheads to ride the subway. I don't know if you ever pick up discarded Metrocards, but occasionally it's worth the effort (and humiliation lol). I've found a few over the years with varying amounts of money still on them. A couple of weeks ago I picked up one resting against a bus window and there was $20 on it! 

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ha ha yeah rip mta tokens 1953-2003 and rip metrocards 2003-2023.

 

they both had good runs of 50yrs and 20yrs.

 

i'm glad mta is kind of late in the game with touchless fare cards because they will be able to use multiple payment systems, like your own credit card, a branded card, gift card, etc., or also an official mta sponsored card, instead of just one type. or so i have read, we will see.

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20 minutes ago, mrnyc said:

ha ha yeah rip mta tokens 1953-2003 and rip metrocards 2003-2023.

 

they both had good runs of 50yrs and 20yrs.

 

i'm glad mta is kind of late in the game with touchless fare cards because they will be able to use multiple payment systems, like your own credit card, a branded card, gift card, etc., or also an official mta sponsored card, instead of just one type. or so i have read, we will see.

I remember when the fare was 50 cents (which is probably what it's still worth😒,if that!), and on weekends they had an offer in which you could get a round trip for that price. When you bought a token you would get a slip of paper that looked like one of the old bus transfers that you would present to the token booth attendant on the return trip, who would then buzz you through the gate. 

 

 

Edited by eastvillagedon

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The Seattle Center Monorail will begin accepting payments via ORCA card. This also means that trips on the monorail will now be eligible for transfers, so if you ride the monorail from Seattle Center to Downtown and then hop on a bus, streetcar, or light rail vehicle within two hours, that transfer is free (or vice versa).

 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but this likely makes ORCA the most widely accepted transit fare payment system in North America, as it is accepted by 10 different transit agencies (Community Transit, Everett Transit, King County Metro, King County Water Taxi, Kitsap Transit, Pierce Transit, Sound Transit, Seattle Streetcar, Washington State Ferries, and now the Seattle Center Monorail). And it's probably the transit card that is accepted on the most modes (bus, streetcar, light rail, commuter rail, monorail, and ferry).

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The Clipper Card in the Bay Area is used for 22 transit agencies...but there is no monorail.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Wow, I had no idea there we so many different transit agencies in the Bay Area. Is it really necessary for there to be an Eastern Contra Costa County Transit Authority and a Western Contra Costa County Transit Authority?

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Just wait for the new commuter rail transbay tube in 15 years...there are currently three commuter rail services, some own their tracks, others don't.  At least there isn't a state boundary to deal with, like Cincinnati. 

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14 hours ago, taestell said:

And it's probably the transit card that is accepted on the most modes (bus, streetcar, light rail, commuter rail, monorail, and ferry).

 

SEPTA Key in Philly is accepted for bus, trackless trolley, streetcar, subway-surface, subway, elevated, commuter rail, and light rail. Can we count all those separately? 🙂

 

No monorail or ferries though. Unfortunately the River Link Ferry is run by DRPA. 

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2 hours ago, taestell said:

Wow, I had no idea there we so many different transit agencies in the Bay Area. Is it really necessary for there to be an Eastern Contra Costa County Transit Authority and a Western Contra Costa County Transit Authority?

 

Do you really want Antioch to socialize with...Richmond?

 

759998_1909210_3280x4928-920x584.jpg

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"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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For all the crap MTA has gotten in planning circles recently I was still really impressed when I was in the city a couple weeks ago. I mean, I guess I have a low bar coming from Ohio, but the trains seemed efficient enough and the newer buses in the fleet were incredibly nice. 


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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2 hours ago, mrnyc said:

mta allegedly figures out a way to shave $1B off the $6B second ave subway phase two — by using the old tunnels and cutting back at 125th st:

 

https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/ny-second-avenue-subway-tunnel-reuse-savings-20190416-ewnrkgj7xjcvlpxx6iua45sgka-story.html

 

 

Interesting.  If built in this fashion, the 116th St. station is going to be an anomaly not just on the Second Ave. line but for the entire system.  It's unclear to me, looking at these images, if they're going to be able to keep the walls between the center and outer tracks intact or if there won't be enough space to enable efficient boarding. 

 

It looks to me like they're going to have to take the roof you see here off in order to build a mez:

116-2.thumb.jpg.ad9a1a81d69638406361dad9c607c473.jpg

 

 

Yeah, those openings look a little too short, aside from being too close together.  Add 50" to where these guys are standing and they'd be hitting their heads to board trains. 

116-3.thumb.jpg.f04ce1d9901ef7daf4881be7d90cffef.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

116-1.jpg

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They would retro fit the station and reduce from 3 tracks to two.  So one of the outer tracks would be platforms on this already complete 10 block section.  This section runs from E 110-120.

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I travel to Milwaukee regularly for work. On my last trip I rode their new streetcar, the Milwaukee Hop. It goes from the  lower East Side (which is just northeast of downtown) to the multimodal transit center in the southwest corner of downtown. It’s 2.1 miles and the ride from end to end took just under 20 minutes. (Note that there are 7 Amtrak trains a day to Chicago from the transit center.)  The city is trying to extend the line from the train station north through the western part of downtown 2.5 blocks to the convention center in time for the DNC next summer. (That seems like an aggressive timeline to me - we’ll see how they do.)  There is also the already planned lakefront loop set to open next year. There are a couple museums on the lake near the terminus of that line along with several of Milwaukee’s tallest buildings. 

 

Here are some pictures. The last picture is the streetcar parking garage under I-794 across from the Amtrak station. 

 

E06BF264-088D-451D-A069-EAEA0D5838F2.thumb.jpeg.216866b797b192643001fae35d1f78eb.jpeg

 

55BC4274-6E07-410B-9261-8A5D9EE5F84C.thumb.jpeg.41a9c3953d1735fa0afd56e7fe5cd263.jpeg

 

DC09FACB-BCD1-4002-B96F-B86A739C7829.thumb.jpeg.811eb02fd92132491fad2b35502b34f3.jpeg

 

FB603C4F-3D75-431E-841A-F5B27A8E9795.thumb.jpeg.a634c2caffc0b30c4ca10c8ee2b7b36b.jpeg

 

 

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That was an interesting article. The costs are just beyond the pale these days (for instance, the Long Island Rail Road project was almost $4 billion a mile of track). Someone, many someones, should have been locked up for that.

Edited by TBideon

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More on the Milwaukee streetcar proposed extension. 

 

https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/politics/2019/05/01/dnc-milwaukee-plans-extend-hop-streetcar-2020-convention/3641691002/

 

Milwaukee plans to extend the streetcar route to the Wisconsin Center District convention hall just in time for the 2020 Democratic National Convention.

 

Mayor Tom Barrett on Wednesday unveiled plans to extend The Hop to Wisconsin Avenue by next summer. He also announced engineering plans for two additional legs that would stretch the streetcar route north past Fiserv Forum into Bronzeville and south into Walker's Point.

 

The extension plans would amount to a major expansion of the 2.1-mile streetcar loop, adding about 2.4 miles of additional route. 

 

The plans must first be approved by the Common Council.  If approved, the $28 million Wisconsin Avenue extension would be about 0.4 mile long, Public Works Commissioner Jeff Polenske said.

...

The mayor wants to pay for the Wisconsin Avenue extension locally through tax increment financing by amending six existing TIF districts, which essentially means the project would not affect the property tax levy.

...

The $124 million project so far includes five streetcars, 18 stations, tracks, overhead wires and a maintenance facility.

 

Construction of the project is funded with a $55 million federal grant and money generated by Milwaukee tax financing districts.

 

The $3.2 million annual operating budget will be covered by fares, advertising revenue, federal grants and cash from city parking meters and parking lots.

...

Rides on the streetcar are free for the first year under a $10 million, 12-year sponsorship with Potawatomi Hotel & Casino.

 

Tracks also have been laid for a lakefront loop that would open in 2020. That line would extend through the Couture, a high-rise apartment tower planned by Barrett Lo Visionary Development LLC.

 

*******

Notes on image: Blue is existing line, Green has track laid but is waiting to open for a high rise development over one section, gold with white dots is immediate extension (hoping to complete before DNC next summer), gold w black dots is next extension, white w gold dashes is longer term planning. 

 

376BFBD2-2D06-4B34-A2D2-2D0B0BA04395.thumb.jpeg.871c3b28a6832ebc197342c1a8d8ecdd.jpeg

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Company proposes ‘flying solar pods’ as new public transit alternative in Madison

 

5cf5e2b38bc4e.image.jpg?resize=750,431

 

One company thinks the future of Madison’s public transit system is 20 feet above city streets in tiny solar-powered pods.

 

Transit X, a Boston-area company, claims it could revolutionize city transportation with a 108-mile network of lightweight “flying solar pods” that would each carry four to five passengers all around Madison on elevated railways.

 

The proposal was met with skepticism Monday at a city Transportation Policy and Planning Board meeting, where a transit planner’s review included 10 reasons the project isn’t currently feasible in Madison.

 

According to Transit X, the proposed 7,103 pods would travel up to 45 mph, be within a five-minute walk of 95% of the city population, have 700 stops and be operational within a year or two. Transit X also proposed a smaller, 31-mile network with 1,916 pods for the city to start with.

 

The company claims it would develop the micro railway at no cost to the city, as the project would be privately funded.

 

Transit X founder Mike Stanley said he thinks the pods are a “silver bullet” that will eventually eliminate the need for buses, cars and other forms of transportation.

...

The planning board said it would continue to monitor Transit X’s progress and might look at its proposal again when it has more evidence that the project is realistic. But for now, the city will keep its focus on developing Bus Rapid Transit.

 

“I would never say something’s not possible because it’s great to think about different ways of doing things, but just this particular model at this time is unproven,” said Ald. Keith Furman, 19th District. “It just doesn’t seem realistic, unfortunately.”

 

More insanity below:

https://madison.com/wsj/news/local/govt-and-politics/company-proposes-flying-solar-pods-as-new-public-transit-alternative/article_69fd2bf1-5979-56f7-9fd7-12c8c28c8e2e.html


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Increasingly, I think these rail and transit replacement ideas are being touted by rail and transit opponents to try and kill rail and transit projects. Unfortunately it's been very successful here in Ohio where elected officials have no idea what a modern passenger train looks like so they fall under the spell of totally tubular trains or fruitloops or these cough drops or whatever.

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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On 6/4/2019 at 4:13 PM, ColDayMan said:

Company proposes ‘flying solar pods’ as new public transit alternative in Madison

 

I love public transit, but Madison WI is probably one of the best walkable and most beautiful downtowns in the the US. This would be ugly.

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so all that hand wringing and hoo ha and no l-pocalypse.

basically, hanging the wires and bondo-ing up the tunnel bench wall is fine.
 

 

Speedy cable installation latest step forward in fast-moving L-train East River tunnel repair job Brooklynites once dreaded

By CLAYTON GUSE

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS |

JUL 28, 2019 

 

It took a contractor just two weekends to finish a big chunk of the L-train East River tunnel repair project, which the MTA says is moving along swiftly.

 

Workers hung 40,000 feet of cable along a wall of the Canarsie Tunnel’s northern tube during the two weekends over the last month. Construction crews will install cable racks on the other half of the tunnel in the coming months.

 

 

more:

https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/ny-l-train-snake-tray-cable-racking-work-20190728-lg3finx3v5eurhtlcczg6obpiq-story.html

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Phoenix votes to keep light rail

A proposition that would have halted light-rail projects and redistribute voter-approved funds to other transportation projects is defeated in a special election.

 

https://www.masstransitmag.com/rail/article/21094643/phoenix-votes-to-keep-light-rail

 

In the end, it wasn’t even close. Phoenix, Ariz., voters, for the fourth time since 2000, took to the ballot box in a special election on Aug. 27 to vote down Proposition 105, which would have stopped existing and future light-rail expansion plans in the city.  

The city says approximately 180,636 ballots were cast, which is the highest number in a Phoenix Special Election involving only ballot measures. Unofficial election results show that 62.33 percent of the votes were against Prop 105 while 37.67 percent were in support of it with approximately 15,000 early ballots remaining to be validated and processed.

 

 

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