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Guest mrnyc

Non-Ohio Transit News & Discussion

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ny water taxis at work downtown at the seaport neighborhood yesterday

 

 

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C7BE9C3D-B873-499A-9B3A-D25200E97854_zps18yrhtau.jpg

 

C868D32D-D0EE-4AE4-AA05-07E33E02A3F3_zpsr4c35qwh.jpg

 

 

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From what I've heard, this is a Cranley-style "pause" which will do nothing but add expense to the project. In the end, the central city connector will still be built. It doesn't make sense for Seattle to continue operating two separate streetcar lines with two separate car barns/maintenance facilities. It makes way more sense to build the middle section that links them and operate it as one line.

 

From what I know of Seattle, I do suspect that the First Hill Streetcar, as-built, was a bit of a mistake.  A streetcar on First Ave. makes a ton of sense, and having that then turn east on Jackson also makes a ton of sense.  But the circuitous way in which the line gets to Broadway is the killer of the functionality of this line, both now and after the First Ave. mile is built.  Right now, the Broadway section and the Jackson section of the First Hill line no doubt function as two separate services, with very few people using the meandering connection between the two areas.  I predict that the Jackson St. area will really take off after the First Ave. section is built, but the section of the First Hill line that is actually in First Hill will continue to serve lukewarm ridership. 

 

Seattle is really crippled by its innate road configuration and the fact that so many single-family homes are situated so close to its downtown.  The table has been set for a hellish housing shortage since single-family homes, no matter how humble, will protect their neighborhoods to the detriment of the region, to the end.  Just like San Francisco. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I've noticed is that it seems like Seattle is doing a lot more to densify and improve transit than San Fran did.  I'm not sure its enough and NIMBYism is rampant, but they seem better prepared than SF.  See: https://seattle.curbed.com/2017/9/29/16386922/seattle-apartment-vacancy-rate

 

See also:

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/real-estate/free-amazon-echo-2-months-free-rent-2500-gift-cards-seattle-apartment-glut-gives-renters-freebies/

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You can now get from downtown Miami to downtown West Palm in an hour with an expansion to Orlando planned. In Miami, Brightline is connected to Metrorail/the free Metromover and free trolley. Long, long, LONG way to go but Miami is beginning to get a little transit.

 

Brightline Service To Miami Begins May 19

 

"Brightline tickets to Miami are on sale this morning through their website. The official service launch will be May 19. As of this morning, departures from Fort Lauderdale to Miami were are priced at $10 for Smart Service and $15 for Select Service. Introductory fares of $3 and $5 are also being offered. Departures from West Palm Beach to Miami was also available, at a cost of $15 for Smart Service and $25 for Select Service."

 

https://www.thenextmiami.com/brightline-has-launched-tickets-sales-to-miami-today/

 

 

i was curious so i checked and the price seems right — for similar distance trip comparison examples its $9.25 off-peak or $12.25 peak from grand central to white plains on mnrr or $14 to morristown on njtransit.

 

 

edit — so its $21.25 off peak or $29.25 peak from penn to montauk on lirr, which is 120 miles. orlando is double that, about 240 miles from miami. so the fully built out brightline ride will come in at around $40-55 i would guess.

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8/17/2018

Pennsylvania plan calls for $64 billion in transportation projects

 

The Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission has adopted an updated 12-year transportation plan, which calls for $63.9 billion worth of improvements to railroads, transit systems, roads, bridges and airports.

 

The new program, which goes into effect Oct. 1, calls for $9.62 billion for public transit, $319 million for multimodal and $228 million for freight-rail projects during 2019 through 2022, according to a press release from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT).

 

From 2023 through 2026, the plan calls for $8.3 billion will be available for public transit, $348 million for multimodal and $229 million for freight rail. During 2027 through 2030, the plan calls for $9.25 billion for transit, $391 million for multimodal and $229 million for freight rail.

 

MORE:

https://www.progressiverailroading.com/rail_industry_trends/news/Pennsylvania-plan-calls-for-64-billion-in-transportation-projects--55390

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Google map of all trolley lines (streetcars, interurbans, etc) in the US that survived until the end of 1957:

https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1dHRvqE8gEzzcc_AGAYBj1q-X-WH_CekB

 

Most US cities had lost their rail transit by 1957, but not all. Trolley systems that lasted past 1957 (end dates where applicable): Boston, Newark, Philadelphia, Baltimore (1963), DC (1962), Johnstown PA (1960), Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Chicago, Milwaukee (1958), New Orleans, St Louis (1966), Waterloo IA (1958), El Paso (1974), LA (1963), SF, Portland OR (1958).

 

Look at how much Pittsburgh still had in 1957....

Pittsburgh_streetcars-interurbans-1957.thumb.JPG.a91897da82c1a0bef18bf04bbb0ab012.JPG

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located in the harbor just below manhattan, they want to redevelop part of governor's island to help pay for the parkland, making it year-round, etc., so the gondola transit plan is back in play:

 

 

Crain’s also noted that the city has already commissioned a second ferry to take construction workers out to the site. But that won’t be enough to transport future commuters to and from the development, even in combination with an expanded East River Ferry service. That’s why the Economic Development Corporation is in talks to put a gondola between Lower Manhattan and Governors Island, further mimicking the layout of Roosevelt Island, which is reachable via a gondola and the F train.

 

 

more:

 

https://archpaper.com/2018/08/governors-island-rezoning/

 

 

governors-island-rendering-trust-1024x0-c-default.jpg

 

 

 

https://archpaper.com/2018/08/governors-island-rezoning/

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I'm guessing this project won't include any affordable housing considering the views.

 

I also wouldn't want to live there if NYC gets a storm which tracks like Sandy did.

 

At this rate there is going to be condos on Ellis and Liberty.  8)

 

 

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^ i know, right?

 

no condos or housing on governors.

 

maybe a few dorms.

 

they are modeling it after lower roosevelt island with the tram and the newish fdr park at the tip and the bloomberg funded cornell campus.

 

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How much does #CarCulture affect transportation?

 

Metro fare evasion = $300 fine and 10 days in jail

 

Drive SOV in I66 HOV lane = $50 fine and no jail

 

It’s hard to not think this policy is legacy of #WhiteFlight  racism. Yet, somehow seeking parity is “controversial!” https://t.co/NhU2JOj2C7

 

Decriminalizing fare evasion on Metro is gaining more steam and growing more controversial. The rules could be changing in DC - but not VA or MD #wmata @nbcwashington https://t.co/WJGGXmqB6I

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well, hmmpfh!

 

Where Chicago Trounces New York: Fixing Mass Transit

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/18/nyregion/chicago-l-train-mta-subway.html

 

CHICAGO — Like New York’s subway, it is another century-old system struggling to keep up with the transit demands of a booming city. It, too, has been plagued by crumbling tracks, antiquated signals and unreliable trains that turn routine commutes into nightmares.

 

But the difference is that Chicago’s L has made a comeback, reversing decades of cost-cutting and neglect.

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