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Columbus: Franklin Park Trolley Barn Project

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<b>Ideas Sought for Franklin Park Trolley Barn Project</b>

By ScottUlrich | August 31, 2010

 

<img src="http://www.columbusunderground.com/archives/trolley-barn-3.jpg">

 

<img src="http://www.columbusunderground.com/archives/trolley-barn-1.jpg">

 

The Columbus Compact Corporation is seeking interested community members to help plan and execute the redevelopment of the Franklin Park Trolley Barn facility, located at the northeast corner of Oak Street and Kelton Avenue, just one block south of Franklin Park on the Near East Side.

 

As part of this effort, the Compact is organizing a group of interested and concerned stakeholders, called Friends of Franklin Park Trolley Barn, which has a page on Facebook. Anyone is encouraged to join this group and support this critical redevelopment effort.

 

READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/ideas-sought-for-franklin-park-trolley-barn-project

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Those buildings are a beauty to explore (if anyone hasn't).  And its location near Franklin Park is great as well!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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More about this project from the Dispatch...

 

Group wants to rehab trolley barn to anchor area's revitalization

Thursday, September 2, 2010

By Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Trolleys are long gone from Columbus streets, but a reminder of those days rests just south of Franklin Park.  A large brick trolley barn sits at Oak Street and Kelton Avenue, one of six buildings there that served the city's trolley system for decades before streetcars faded.  Now there's an effort to try to redevelop the site to serve not only as a neighborhood anchor but spur revitalization around it.

 

The Columbus Compact, a nonprofit development group, will host a public meeting from 10 a.m. to 2p.m. Saturday at Central Community House, 1150 E. Main Street, to gather ideas.  The Neighborhood Design Center, a nonprofit group that does planning and design work for inner-city neighborhoods, also is involved.

 

Full article: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/09/02/riding-the-past-into-the-future.html?sid=101

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Hmmm... if they weren't already doing the Wonderland artists colony, I'd say this would be an ideal location for something like that.

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With the North Market essentially operating at full capacity and with it being totally sustainable and independent of city funding, I think it's time to consider a second location.

 

Bring on the "East Market". ;)

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Officials hope to rescue old trolley site

Sunday, June 26, 2011 

By Mark Ferenchik, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

A complex of buildings that once housed Columbus streetcars did not endure the winter well.  Freezing and thawing and age have loosened bricks that then toppled from a wall.  Rotting wood is weakening roof trusses.

 

Now, officials are trying to determine whether the buildings are worth saving to be redeveloped into something else to benefit the struggling East Side neighborhood around them.  A $20,931 federal grant will pay for a feasibility study and business plan.  The city and the Columbus Compact Corp. - a private, nonprofit developer - applied for the grant through the Ohio Historic Preservation Office.

 

The six brick buildings at Oak Street and Kelton Avenue just south of Franklin Park were built between 1880 and 1920 to serve the city's streetcar system.

 

PHOTOS OF THE TROLLEY BARN COMPLEX

 

LOCATION MAP

 

READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2011/06/26/officials-hope-to-rescue-old-trolley-site.html?sid=101

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Judge gives trolley-barn owner an extension

Nonprofit also offers to buy East Side complex that has fallen into disrepair

By Mark Ferenchik, The Columbus Dispatch

Tuesday, December 4, 2012 - 5:54 AM

 

The owner of an old East Side trolley-barn complex said yesterday that she will work to bring it up to code after a judge delayed a hearing to hold her in contempt for not making ordered repairs.  Meanwhile, the nonprofit Columbus Compact Corp. made an offer yesterday to buy and save the buildings at 1610 Oak St. for $189,000.  Property owner Minnie McGee said she had not seen the proposal and had no comment.

 

Assistant City Attorney Kristen Kroflich had reopened a 2005 case against McGee after nearby residents and leaders complained about the condition of the buildings, built between 1880 and 1920 just south of Franklin Park. ... Franklin County Environmental Judge Harland H. Hale had scheduled a hearing yesterday but delayed it until Jan. 10 at McGee’s request.  Hale allowed community members to speak in court yesterday.  James Flannery, president of the Franklin Park Civic Association, told him that while neighbors are worried about the dangers posed by the crumbling buildings, he thinks the complex can be redeveloped.

 

Jonathan Beard, the president and CEO of the Columbus Compact, a community-development group, gave McGee a letter proposing to buy the buildings for $189,000.  That includes $75,000 to bring the buildings up to code and secure them in six months.

 

READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2012/12/04/judge-gives-trolley-barn-owner-an-extension.html

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Very nicely appointed facebook page from the "Friends of Franklin Park Trolley Barn" (linked below).  Good number of photos showing the Trolley Barn's current dilapidated state.  Also, a good number of renderings showing what a restored Trolley Barn site might look like.  Definately worth a look.

 

Friends of Franklin Park Trolley Barn - facebook page

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The property owner of the Franklin Park Trolley Barn complex at 1610 Oak Street had another hearing before Franklin County Environmental Judge Harland Hale yesterday.  Nothing got resolved at yesterday's hearing.  But a resolution to the complex's code issues might be coming soon - despite the headline from the Dispatch's report on the hearing: Trolley barn’s future is in limbo

 

A court ruling in yesterday's hearing was delayed by Judge Hale so he could research the legal difference between a building being within a nationally recognized historic district - which the trolley barn complex is - versus a building being individually listed as a national historic structure - which the trolley barn complex is not.  The judge also scheduled a site visit for January 25 and rescheduled the contempt hearing for February 28. 

 

In doing so, Judge Hale warned the property owner, Minnie McGee, that there would be no more continuances.  Furthermore, he seemed to be openly skeptical in yesterday's hearing about the current property owner's ability to either maintain or redevelop the trolley barn complex. 

 

From today's Dispatch article:  McGee submitted plans to the city’s building department on Wednesday for the first phase of a three-year process to restore the buildings.  Tom Shelby, McGee’s project manager, said the complex could become a marketplace.  He said it would cost $1.9 million to get the buildings in shape for developers to make further improvements and that he and McGee are trying to secure financing.

 

“Essentially nothing has been done,” Judge Hale said, adding that her plans are “farfetched.”  “You ain’t fooling me.  There’s no way you’re getting the millions to do this.  This place is either going to get redeveloped or sold,” Hale said.

 

After the hearing, McGee said she has no plans to sell the 3-acre site and every intention of making the necessary repairs.

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History Lesson: A tale of two trolley barns

By: Doug Motz

 

Many of the readers of Columbus Underground are incredibly interested in bringing alternative forms of public transportation to Columbus – specifically street cars and light rail. To get a sense of how the trolleys were connected into the very fabric of our daily lives a hundred plus years ago, it may be of interest to note that in 1904, our city was so well served by them that the Columbus Board of Trade wrote the following about them in their pamphlet titled Columbus Ohio:

 

“Emerging from the (Union) Station through the grand archway, passengers find themselves facing High Street on which a streetcar passes every half-minute bearing its patrons to such such parts of the city as their business or pleasure may suggest; while uniformed officials stand everywhere ready to give direction or make courteous answer to all interrogations.”

 

The pamphlet goes on to write that “the city of Columbus becomes a railroad center where its establishment is as beautiful to the eye as it is convenient for the conduct of the enormous traffic that daily makes draft upon its resources.”

 

Read more at: http://www.columbusunderground.com/history-lesson-a-tale-of-two-trolley-barns

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Eh. The Franklin Park trolly barn is simply just a hair too far from the revitalization that only recently made eastbound inroads from Parsons and Bexley isn't going to annex Franklin Park (unfortunate, considering what the city could do with it based on Main St. It's a goner and hopefully by the time improvements expand east on Oak and maybe even Main we'll see interest in developing this empty grass lot a la Harrison Park.

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There been alot of postings on the 2013 court hearings about the Franklin Park Trolley Barn that got wiped out in the UO server crash.  Here's a rundown of the hearings:

 

February 28, 2013 Hearing in the Franklin County Environmental Court

NBC4: Old Trolley Station Owner Held In Contempt Of Court

ABC6: Columbus Landlord Faces Daily Fines

10TV: Judge Orders Owner Of Franklin Park Trolley Barn To Clean It Up Or Pay

Dispatch: Nuisance property: Judge blunt with trolley-barn owner

 

April 8, 2013 Environmental Court Hearing

ABC6: Judge may force sale dilapidated property

Dispatch: Trolley-barn owner faces August 15 deadline for redevelopment plan

Dispatch: Trolley Barn site at risk of foreclosure

 

Since the April hearing, the Environmental Court Judge who had been hearing the case retired and a new judge has taken over the case.  Because of that, the August 15 deadline mentioned above got extended to September 9.  The Franklin Park Trolley Barn case is scheduled to be heard again, today at 1:30PM.

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A settlement was reached between the city and the Trolley Barn property owner during yesterday's hearing:

 

Deal means crumbling trolley barns on Near East Side will be sold

By John Futty, The Columbus Dispatch

Tuesday, September 10, 2013 - 5:35 AM

 

The owner of the dilapidated trolley-barn buildings on the Near East Side has six months to sell the property or face foreclosure by the city.  The owner, Minnie McGee, reached an agreement with the city yesterday during a break in a court hearing over the fines she has amassed for failing to correct code violations at the 1610 Oak Street property.

 

In the agreement, she concedes that the city is entitled to a judgment of $30,000 in civil-contempt fines that have been accumulating since an April 1 order was issued by the Franklin County Environmental Court.  However, the judgment won’t take effect unless she fails to find a buyer for the property by March 4.

 

The city can “execute the judgment in any manner that it chooses,” according to the agreement, which would give the city standing to foreclose.  “The property will be sold,” City Attorney Richard C. Pfeiffer Jr. said after the hearing. “Either she sells it or we will.”  The 3-acre property, which contains six buildings, will go on the market Tuesday with an asking price of $500,000, the parties agreed.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/09/10/deal-means-crumbling-trolley-barns-will-be-sold.html

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Bad times for Trolley Barn owner, Minnie McGee.  A bench warrant was issued for Ms. McGee after she failed to appear in court Friday on a housing code violation on a different property she owns.  That and she's still on the hook for a $30,000 fine she doesn't sell off her trolley barn property by March 4.  Below is the report from Channel 4:

 

NBC4: Bench Warrant Issued For Old Trolley Station Owner

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Great news about the Franklin Park Trolley Barn property!  The bad old owner has sold it to a good new owner.  No announced plans for the property yet.  But this is a BIG step in the right direction toward its redevelopment.

 


Real-estate broker buys trolley barns

Plans not yet known for East Side eyesore

By Mark Ferenchik, The Columbus Dispatch

Friday, April 25, 2014 - 10:15 AM

 

The crumbling trolley-barn buildings on the Near East Side have a new owner.  After months of negotiations and a years-long court odyssey, the owner of the site — Minnie McGee — has sold the property for $337,000 to Brad DeHays, the man behind the Rehab Tavern in Franklinton and broker/owner of Connect Realty.

 

The deal was completed on Thursday, said Peter Merkle, the broker who represented DeHays.  Merkle would not say what DeHays has in mind for the complex.  The sale price is the same as the value an appraiser had set last year for the 3-acre site at 1610 Oak Street south of Franklin Park that has six brick buildings erected between 1880 and 1920.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/04/25/trolley_barns_sold.html

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A little more about the sale of the trolley barn property from CU at http://www.columbusunderground.com/franklin-park-trolley-barn-property-sold-bw1.

 

The Dispatch also had a follow-up report/update on Saturday at http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/04/25/trolley_barns_sold.html in which the following was added from their Friday report:

 

"The deal was completed on Thursday, said Peter Merkle, the broker for DeHays.  He said DeHays plans a mixed-use development with residential, commercial and retail components.  Merkle said the plan calls for the trolley buildings to be preserved and incorporated into the project."

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:-o

 

Trolley barn complex could get Columbus Brewing taproom, Ray Ray's and housing under $21M plan

 

A $21.5 million plan could see abandoned trolley barns on the Near East Side converted into a new marketplace and residences.

 

The plan would see the former trolley barn complex of six buildings at 1600 Oak St. south of Franklin Park converted into a market that would feature restaurants and retail shops, with a series of outdoor patios and plazas connecting them in a $9 million rehabilitation. On an adjacent Oak Street lot, a $10 million, four-story, 78-unit residential complex would be constructed, with a small "pocket park" serving both developments.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2017/10/11/trolley-barn-complex-could-get-columbus-brewing.html


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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:-o

 

Trolley barn complex could get Columbus Brewing taproom, Ray Ray's and housing under $21M plan

 

A $21.5 million plan could see abandoned trolley barns on the Near East Side converted into a new marketplace and residences.

 

The plan would see the former trolley barn complex of six buildings at 1600 Oak St. south of Franklin Park converted into a market that would feature restaurants and retail shops, with a series of outdoor patios and plazas connecting them in a $9 million rehabilitation. On an adjacent Oak Street lot, a $10 million, four-story, 78-unit residential complex would be constructed, with a small "pocket park" serving both developments.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2017/10/11/trolley-barn-complex-could-get-columbus-brewing.html

 

The Dispatch article has renderings:

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171011/possible-trolley-barn-project-could-bring-restaurants-market-residences-to-near-east-side

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The developer for the Franklin Park Trolley Barn complex applied for Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits, but was turned down for the latest round announced this week.  The developer, Brad DeHays of Connect Realty, says he will reapply for the next round of tax credits in the spring:

 

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171219/state-turns-down-tax-credits-for-near-east-side-trolley-barn-project

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The developer for the Franklin Park Trolley Barn complex applied for Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits, but was turned down for the latest round announced this week.  The developer, Brad DeHays of Connect Realty, says he will reapply for the next round of tax credits in the spring:

 

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171219/state-turns-down-tax-credits-for-near-east-side-trolley-barn-project

 

And they were approved this time around!

 

Trolley barn, auto dealership awarded historic tax credits to aid renovation

 

"Two long-vacant East Side properties, including the former Columbus trolley barn complex, received state financing approval Wednesday that will allow the properties to be renovated.

 

The state awarded Historic Preservation Tax Credits to the two projects:

 

• The Columbus Electric Trolley Barns, 1600 E. Oak Street. Developer Brad DeHays, with Connect Realty, plans to convert the crumbling complex into a food market, brewpub, barbecue restaurant and offices. The $20 million project, which received $2 million in tax credits, also calls for building 103 apartments immediately south of the trolley barn buildings.

 

• The McClure Nesbitt Motor Co., 1503-1507 E. Main Street. Columbus Compact Corp., a nonprofit East Side developer, plans to convert the former auto dealership into a theater, art gallery, music studio and event space topped by 11 second-floor apartments. The $2 million project received $250,000 in tax credits."

 

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20180620/trolley-barn-auto-dealership-awarded-historic-tax-credits-to-aid-renovation

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The developer for the Franklin Park Trolley Barn complex applied for Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits, but was turned down for the latest round announced this week.  The developer, Brad DeHays of Connect Realty, says he will reapply for the next round of tax credits in the spring:

 

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171219/state-turns-down-tax-credits-for-near-east-side-trolley-barn-project

 

And they were approved this time around!

 

Trolley barn, auto dealership awarded historic tax credits to aid renovation

 

"Two long-vacant East Side properties, including the former Columbus trolley barn complex, received state financing approval Wednesday that will allow the properties to be renovated.

 

The state awarded Historic Preservation Tax Credits to the two projects:

 

• The Columbus Electric Trolley Barns, 1600 E. Oak Street. Developer Brad DeHays, with Connect Realty, plans to convert the crumbling complex into a food market, brewpub, barbecue restaurant and offices. The $20 million project, which received $2 million in tax credits, also calls for building 103 apartments immediately south of the trolley barn buildings.

 

• The McClure Nesbitt Motor Co., 1503-1507 E. Main Street. Columbus Compact Corp., a nonprofit East Side developer, plans to convert the former auto dealership into a theater, art gallery, music studio and event space topped by 11 second-floor apartments. The $2 million project received $250,000 in tax credits."

 

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20180620/trolley-barn-auto-dealership-awarded-historic-tax-credits-to-aid-renovation

 

103 apartments is great in that area.

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Two Columbus Projects Awarded State Historic Tax Credits

 

The Ohio Development Services Agency announced today that two Columbus redevelopment projects – both on the Near East Side – were awarded Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits.

 

One was a proposal from Brad DeHays of Connect Realty to turn a long-vacant former trolley barn into a public market. Restaurants, offices and plazas are also planned for the site, which is located at the northeast corner of Oak Street and Kelton Avenue.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/two-columbus-projects-awarded-state-historic-tax-credits-bw1

 

Trolley-Barn-Market-Interior.jpg


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Plans for East Market at Trolley District Take Another Step Forward

 

The renovation of the Trolley Barn site on the city’s Near East Side took another step forward last night during a Near East Area Commission planning committee meeting. Representatives from developer Connect Realty presented updated plans for review, which now include a full parking plan and more information on the apartment site development on the south side of Oak Street.

 

“We got a good reception at the meeting last night and I think everyone understands the time we’ve taken on this, and that we’re making a massive investment in the neighborhood,” explained Brad DeHays, Founder of Connect Realty. “We’ve received support via email from different associations and we hope to continue to garner support.”

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/plans-for-east-market-at-trolley-district-take-another-step-forward-we1

 

Trolley-Barn-update-06.jpg


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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$30M trolley barn project beginning to move foward

 

Trolley-Barn-update-01-1150x550.jpg

 

A long-sought East Market could well have the funding it needs to finally get off the ground. Now the work begins.

 

Thursday night, Brad DeHays of Connect Realty brought the first sketches of the "Trolley District" – his plan for the Columbus Electric Trolley Barn – to the Near East Side Commission. The $30 million project aims to convert the former trolley barns into a new market and apartment complex that could spur development in the area.

 

A $2 million award in state historic tax credits announced this year was a major boost for the project, and DeHays says he's got a team of investors aboard. The project now begins moving through the approval process and also faces a ballot issue before proceeding.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/20/30m-trolley-barn-project-beginning-to-move-foward.html


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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The Dispatch published renderings of the Trolley Barn project but it's behind their paywall. The project will break ground soon.

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Even with a $250,000 state grant DeHays is now seeking to divert 70% of his downtown projects' property taxes (already abated) to fund the market. He's asking the school board for a 30 year plan. It'll divert $187,356/year to fund the market for the first 15 years. Then after those original properties' abatements run out, the market will be getting $405,359/year from diverted school funding.

 

"Without the market, the project won't happen."

 

https://www.dispatch.com/news/20191011/trolley-barn-redevelopment-seeks-tax-subsidy

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I'm not entirely opposed to finding some additional funds for this project. I would prefer they find more independent sources of funding but this being a pretty transformative and significant preservation project, I think it deserves a little more attention than your standard project. 

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Columbus City Council to vote on tax incentive for trolley barn development

 

screen-shot-2018-07-20-at-21901-pm*750xx

 

The $30 million project to redevelop the Columbus Electric Trolley Barn into a mixed-use development including a new East Market is the first in the city up for a new type of redevelopment incentive.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/12/16/columbus-city-council-to-vote-on-tax-incentive-for.html

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"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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The immediate vicinity deserves reactivation and this project is capable of doing it. I was just walking around Wolfe Park on Sunday thinking, "This is such a spectacular part of town." But without businesses that serve the public it can't reach its full potential. Sure the large-format Turkey Hill and Rusty Bag are around but it needs more.

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MODERATOR NOTE:  The Dispatch just posted an article about the status of various development projects around Columbus and Central Ohio.  The status of some of these projects have already been posted in other threads.  For those projects that haven't already been updated, I'll post an update from the article in the appropriate thread.

 


Here's an update of the Franklin Park Trolley Barn project from the below linked article:

 

https://www.thisweeknews.com/business/20200523/some-major-columbus-development-projects-on-hold-while-others-move-forward

 

Quote

Work also is moving ahead on the redevelopment of the Trolley Barn site in Franklin Park, a key project in the revitalization of the Near East Side.

 

“When this happened, there was a period of unknowns when we slowed down because we didn’t want to put people at risk,” said Brad DeHays, with the developer Connect Real Estate.

 

“We were supposed to open at the end of the year. That will be a tough timeline to hit,” he added. “The next six months will determine if we can get back to our original schedule.”

 

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