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Article published June 15, 2010

 

Wyandot County solar project finishes early

Alternative-energy site started in September

Toledo Blade

By ALIYYA SWABY

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The largest solar power field in Ohio has been completed three months early. The Wyandot Solar project near Upper Sandusky now can supply electricity for more than 1,400 homes.

 

Juwi Solar Inc., which built the power-generation project, announced yesterday it finished its work that began in September on an 83-acre site in Salem Township near an American Electric Power substation.

 

It started supplying two American Electric companies - Ohio Power Co. and Columbus Southern Power - with 12 megawatts of power on May 26.

 

Full story at:  http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100615/BUSINESS01/6150397

 

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Toledo moves to reinvent itself from Glass City to Solar City.By Judy Keen, USA TODAY

 

TOLEDO — This city is trying to swap its Rust Belt

image for a new identity as a hub of solar-energy

research and production.

 

The mission is being led by an unusual partnership

of business, academia and government that could

be a model for other aging industrial cities. "We are

ready to do anything; we are ready to try anything,"

says University of Toledo President Lloyd Jacobs.

 

Like many manufacturing cities, Toledo has

struggled with the loss of jobs and tax revenue, but

it has taken pieces of its past as the glass capital to

create a new future in solar energy.

 

Full story at: http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/energy/2010-06-15-toledo15_CV_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

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Wow.

 

"The impetus for collaboration came when Toledo's per-capita income, in the nation's top 10 in the 1970s, sank to the bottom 10 by 2000."

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Article published June 15, 2010

 

Wyandot County solar project finishes early

Alternative-energy site started in September

Toledo Blade

By ALIYYA SWABY

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The largest solar power field in Ohio has been completed three months early. The Wyandot Solar project near Upper Sandusky now can supply electricity for more than 1,400 homes.

 

Juwi Solar Inc., which built the power-generation project, announced yesterday it finished its work that began in September on an 83-acre site in Salem Township near an American Electric Power substation.

 

It started supplying two American Electric companies - Ohio Power Co. and Columbus Southern Power - with 12 megawatts of power on May 26.

 

Full story at: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100615/BUSINESS01/6150397

 

 

I would prefer to see these installed on the roofs of large structures rather than taking up arrable land.

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This highlights some of the challenges facing U.S. companies, especially in green energy. Why go through government red tape here when China is awaiting you with open, loving arms?

 

Clean Energy: Why Is China Ahead of the U.S.?

Solar Start-Up in New Jersey Said China Gave Them a Deal They Couldn't Refuse

By KI MAE HEUSSNER, ABC News, June 16, 2010

 

Chuck Provini, a former Marine with no fewer than 19 military decorations, considers himself a "good American and a patriot."

 

He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, served as a Marine Corps captain in the Vietnam War and has lived his whole life in the United States. But now that he's the president of a growing solar technology start-up, he's finding himself in a difficult position: He must leave the United States behind.

 

His company, Natcore Technology, based in Red Bank, N.J., holds the license to technology that makes solar panels cheaper, more efficient and less toxic to the environment. He said he tried to commercialize the technology domestically, but while bureaucracy and red tape stalled talks with state and federal officials, conversations with Chinese officials sped ahead.

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Wow.

 

"The impetus for collaboration came when Toledo's per-capita income, in the nation's top 10 in the 1970s, sank to the bottom 10 by 2000."

 

Not news to anyone who lives around here (and it's gotten much worse since 2000). We've seen the city go from one of the best in America to one of the worst. But I don't think most people outside Toledo know how drastic the economic decline has been (every bit as severe as Detroit, even more pronounced in terms of income). A lot of people don't believe that Toledo was a wealthy place as recently as the 70's and 80's. During the 80's, there were six or seven Fortune 500 companies in the city limits, and large banks that have since been swallowed up. Toledo had a lot of corporate clout for a market its size.

 

It's the most overlooked story of economic decline in America. Detroit steals all the spotlight. The issue in Toledo is way too much reliance on education. The competition for jobs is incredibly fierce as a result of this. The plus side is that if you can make it in Toledo, you can make it anywhere. Metro Toledo has the highest college enrollment rate (aged 18-24) of any metro area in America! Yet it has one of the lowest rates of college grads over the age of 25. Hmm, I wonder why that is...

 

Welcome to Toledo reality:

 

A study released Sunday from the Brookings Institution places the Toledo metro area at the top of that higher education, stay-in-school trend - with 60 percent of area 18 to 24-year-olds enrolled in higher education as of 2008.

 

That was the highest percentage of any of the nation's 100 largest metro areas, according to the study. And it compares to just 45 percent in 2000.

 

On the negative side, young people could be seeking degrees merely to escape the current Toledo economy and are planning to leave the area and take their degrees with them. Some sobering, even depressing, economic statistics from the same study show falling income this decade in the Toledo metro area. From 2000-2008, median household annual income fell to $44,548 from $51,998, or by 14.3 percent. That was the third-largest rate of decline of the 100 largest metro areas. The average median hourly pay also fell to $17.14 from $18.64, or by 8 percent. That was the fourth-biggest rate of decline.

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/article/20100509/NEWS16/5090315

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This is very relevant for Cleveland.  We have lots of graduates with engineering and science degrees but no place for them to work.  As a result they leave the area taking with them the investment in made in them by the community.  It comes down to jobs, jobs, jobs.  When are we going to learn that jobs is job #1.  Social justice, equality, etc. etc. is all meaningless in a failing economy.

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Report yields surprising results about Cleveland's solar energy market

July 14, 2015 UPDATED 20 HOURS AGO

By DAN SHINGLER 

 

It looks like Cleveland might be a better market for solar energy than some have predicted. It’s better than Chicago, for example, as well as Pittsburgh and Charlotte. It’s even a better market than sun-drenched Houston.

 

That’s according to San Francisco-based BuildZoom, at least.

 

BuildZoom is a website that helps homeowners, businesses and others to find qualified contractors for construction, remodeling and rehab work. To do its work, it looks at building permits to help determine what licensed contractors are doing around the country. BuildZoom looked at more than 75 million permits in doing its research.

 

Recently, it decided it could also use its database to produce some statistics on solar energy installations as well, and it issued a report showing where solar is hot around the United States, as well as which contractors are the biggest when it comes to solar installations. It found some surprising results, about both Cleveland’s solar market and the market for photovoltaic installations in the United States generally.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150714/NEWS/150719923/report-yields-surprising-results-about-clevelands-solar-energy


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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Not Ohio specific....

 

There are now twice as many solar jobs as coal jobs in the US

http://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2017/2/7/14533618/solar-jobs-coal


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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Not Ohio specific....

 

There are now twice as many solar jobs as coal jobs in the US

http://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2017/2/7/14533618/solar-jobs-coal

 

"Now, mind you, comparing solar and coal is a bit unfair. Solar is growing fast from a tiny base, which means there's a lot of installation work to be done right now, whereas no one is building new coal plants in the US anymore. (Quite the contrary: Many older coal plants have been closing in recent years, thanks to stricter air-pollution rules and cheap natural gas.) So solar is in a particularly labor-intensive phase at the moment. Still, it’s worth thinking through what these numbers mean."

 

Also, if a utility gets 30% of its energy from coal plants, are they counting 30% of their employees?

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Does anyone know if there are active Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs in Northeast Ohio? The only search links I can find are from 2010 and dormant.

 

I own a south facing, slate roofed house in Shaker Heights. I would like to replace the roof with Tesla slate-style solar shingles + 1 or 2 Powerwall batteries. PACE financing would smooth out the cost. Goal would be to install enough battery capacity to eventually charge 2 electric vehicles with >200 mile range batteries.

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Random idea: solar companies should put some big solar installations in by Washington DC airport and other big city airports so that when government officials and businessmen from flyover country visit they see them and get normalized to the idea and encourage solar back home.


www.cincinnatiideas.com

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