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Beyond the 3C's: Demolition Watch

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Anyone who thinks the Neighborhood Stabilization Program is not being used for second wave urban renewal is really fooling themselves. These have only been abandoned for a couple of years. There are literally hundreds of abandoned buildings in Toledo in worse shape in less desirable areas.

 

Article published March 09, 2010

2 historic buildings in West Toledo likely to be history

By JC REINDL

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

A pair of 120-year-old vacant apartment buildings in Toledo's Old West End neighborhood could soon be razed following a demolition vote yesterday by the Old West End Historic District Commission. Although aesthetically unique from the exterior, the three-story buildings of reddish-brown brick and decorative stone at 2127 and 2131 Collingwood Blvd. have suffered frm neglect in recent years and are crumbling — particularly inside...

 

The buildings, which date to 1890 and were once known as “Collingwood Manor” and “Georgian Manor,” suffer from multiple roof and ceiling leaks, a weather-exposed interior, hollowed-out walls, and filthy, trash-strewn conditions...

 

Mr. Mossing said he anticipates using Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant money for the demolition, which he hopes can happen soon...

 

Resident Robert Davis of Lawrence Avenue noted how the buildings sit along a very visible part of Collingwood and told commissioners he hopes someone can quickly redevelop the site. “To tear those buildings down and to leave the properties empty would be tantamount to walking around with your two front teeth out,” Mr. Davis said...

 

“It is going to be a humongous hole in what is one of the strongest streets in the neighborhood,” Mr. Sullivan said. “It's mind-numbing to me that we're going to take it down and decide what we're going to do with it later.”

 

READ FULL STORY AT BLADE SITE (thank God people are angry about this)

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100309/NEWS16/100309740

 

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Another demolition controversy in Toledo right now is the old United Way building on Jackson. United Way built a new building next door, is planning to tear down the old one, and wants to convert the lot into a park until possibly selling it. It has created a massive controversy in Toledo.

 

Article published March 12, 2010

United Way Demolition OK'd

City's plan panel rebuffs pleas by preservationists

By JC REINDL

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The United Way of Greater Toledo's controversial request to demolish its former headquarters downtown won narrow approval yesterday from the city's plan commission, rebuffing pleas by preservationists for a six-month reprieve...

 

"If we continue tearing down these buildings in the heart of our community, you're going to get a downtown that continues to look more like an office park or a strip mall," said Lucas County Commissioner Ben Konop, one of several speakers who lobbied the plan commission unsuccessfully for a six-month delay to allow time to aggressively market the building for re-use...

 

In discussing the old headquarters' fate, Mr. Gstalder attested to the building's poor interior layout and said he disagreed with claims that the angular brown masonry structure contributes to a dense urban setting...

 

In discussing the old headquarters' fate, Mr. Gstalder attested to the building's poor interior layout and said he disagreed with claims that the angular brown masonry structure contributes to a dense urban setting. The facility is rather a "campus building" that happens to be near downtown, he said. "This is a suburban building - it does not add to the urban core," Mr. Gstalder said. "What you're looking at is essentially a lovely sculpture but a failed building."...

 

Councilman Mike Craig said he was undecided. "It depends on the circumstances," Mr. Craig said. "There are other buildings I would rather save - one being the former Fifth Third Bank building on Madison Avenue. If you are going to have to pick your fights, that one really concerns me. It's an integral part of a block."

 

READ FULL STORY AT BLADE SITE (huge article with links to other articles and editorials about it)

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100312/NEWS16/3120330

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Anyone who thinks the Neighborhood Stabilization Program is not being used for second wave urban renewal is really fooling themselves. These have only been abandoned for a couple of years. There are literally hundreds of abandoned buildings in Toledo is worse shape in less desirable areas.

 

Article published March 09, 2010

2 historic buildings in West Toledo likely to be history

By JC REINDL

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

A pair of 120-year-old vacant apartment buildings in Toledo's Old West End neighborhood could soon be razed following a demolition vote yesterday by the Old West End Historic District Commission. Although aesthetically unique from the exterior, the three-story buildings of reddish-brown brick and decorative stone at 2127 and 2131 Collingwood Blvd. have suffered frm neglect in recent years and are crumbling — particularly inside...

 

The buildings, which date to 1890 and were once known as “Collingwood Manor” and “Georgian Manor,” suffer from multiple roof and ceiling leaks, a weather-exposed interior, hollowed-out walls, and filthy, trash-strewn conditions...

 

Mr. Mossing said he anticipates using Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant money for the demolition, which he hopes can happen soon...

 

Resident Robert Davis of Lawrence Avenue noted how the buildings sit along a very visible part of Collingwood and told commissioners he hopes someone can quickly redevelop the site. “To tear those buildings down and to leave the properties empty would be tantamount to walking around with your two front teeth out,” Mr. Davis said...

 

“It is going to be a humongous hole in what is one of the strongest streets in the neighborhood,” Mr. Sullivan said. “It's mind-numbing to me that we're going to take it down and decide what we're going to do with it later.”

 

READ FULL STORY AT BLADE SITE (thank God people are angry about this)

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100309/NEWS16/100309740

 

 

THis is a total waste. These are beautiful buildings in what should be Toledo's best neighborhood. I know that some government funds can and perhaps should be used to help rehab these, but where is the private money? Once these are gone, nothing even close will replace them.

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Back to: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100412/NEWS16/4120312

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Article published April 12, 2010

 

Downtown landmarks face challenge to future

Preservationists battle shaky economy

 

By JC REINDL

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

Keeping downtown Toledo's historic and unique building stock intact is a challenge of will and financial means - as was the struggle to get those grand structures off blueprints and in the ground.

 

"Scores of hotels were built on paper, but one by one, the projects fell through. No one could be found who would risk their money in the enterprise," The Blade wrote in 1908.

 

Full story at above link:

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Excellent article. I'm glad Joe McNamara is standing up against the defeatist attitude:

 

"I believe we can be an amazing city, but I don't believe that we can become an amazing city if we defeat ourselves by destroying our beautiful building stock," Mr. McNamara said.

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ALLIANCE - Moose Lodge: Acquired by the city and razed in May

 

2008_0119--0219.jpg

 

2009_0531Ytown0044.jpg

 

2009_0531Ytown0045.jpg

 

STEUBENVILLE - City Building Annex: Replaced by new city hall and will be demolished in June/July for greenspace

 

2009_0412East_Ohio0250.jpg

 

STEUBENVILLE - Coal's Hoagie Building: Restored in 1999 and destroyed by fire last year; to be demolished in upcoming months by the city

 

NK_Stuebenville1.jpg

 

SPRINGFIELD - Clark County Memorial Hall: Abandoned in 1985 and will become the site of a new downtown ice rink

 

2009_0606Spring0197.jpg

 

2009_0606Spring0198.jpg

 

MIDDLETOWN - Studio Theatre: Acquired by the city as part of a larger demolition project; the city is negotiating for a connecting property to demolish at the same time

 

2008_1105OSU0286.jpg

 

FOSTORIA - Miller Block Buildings - Rumored to be condemed and facing demolition

 

FostoriaDemolitions.jpg

 

CIRCLEVILLE - Smith Block: After much controversy, city council overturned the city's design review board to allow demoliton; the owners are currently open to selling the building and facing bank issues

 

2009_0412East_Ohio0417.jpg

 

2009_0412East_Ohio0422.jpg

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I haven't seen most of those towns, much less those buildings, but these buildings are excellent.  I expecially like the Clark County Memorial Hall.  Thanks for keeping us updated.

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The Morning Journal (morningjournal.com), Serving Northern Ohio

 

News

 

MAP: Downtown Elyria buildings to be razed

Thursday, June 3, 2010

 

By KELLY METZ

kmetz@MorningJournal.com

 

ELYRIA — Some county-owned buildings on Broad Street will soon be razed to become a parking lot for the Lorain County Transportation Center, Lorain County Administrator Jim Cordes said.

 

The buildings at 225, 227 and 229 Broad Street will be torn down as soon as the Lorain County Commissioners receive bids from companies, Cordes said...

 

URL: http://www.morningjournal.com/articles/2010/06/03/news/mj2829166.prt

 

© 2010 morningjournal.com, a Journal Register Property

 


These aren't historic properties by any stretch.  However, it seems stupid to knock down these buildings with federal stimulus money to create a parking lot (for a transportation center - ironically).  The properties on each side are already surface parking, so this will make almost a whole block of Elyria's main street into a parking lot.

 

http://maps.google.com/maps?source=embed&hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=101149184159321090384.0004880ef0340f2a52b7d&ll=41.367634,-82.102364&spn=0,0.006518&z=18&layer=c&cbll=41.367638,-82.102474&panoid=WCeR9MBCJGO24AioTCLvIw&cbp=12,331.12,,0,4.85

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^ holy crapola -- did i just read what i think i read from that article?!! g-g-g look at this re the buildings in question:

 

“We are taking all of them now and upgrading them for parking.”

 

:-o  :whip:  :shoot:

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Does anyone (Jeffrey) know about this property at 1620 Brown St?

 

HPIM4576.jpg

 

HPIM4577.jpg

 

New UD housing to be built on site of Frank Z car dealership

By Lucas Sullivan, Staff Writer 

Updated 7:25 AM Tuesday, July 13, 2010

 

DAYTON — The University of Dayton is expanding its footprint along Brown Street, partnering with a development firm to build student housing on the vacant Frank Z Chevrolet property.

 

The project is an effort to address record student enrollment. UD is expecting its largest freshman class in 40 years this fall and its graduate student enrollment is up 18 percent over the previous year.

 

The property at 1620 Brown St. , including parking lots to the south and west, was purchased in May for $3 million by the Miller-Valentine Group, according to the Montgomery County auditor’s website. The group will demolish all buildings on the property and, working with UD, build roughly 400 apartment-style, student-housing units, said Timothy Downs, city of Dayton’s deputy economic development director.

 

more: http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/dayton-news/new-ud-housing-to-be-built-on-site-of-frank-z-car-dealership-807601.html

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Yeah, it was the Oakwood Street Railroad trolley barn.  They back part was their shops.

 

What makes this operation special and of some note is the Oakwood Street railroad didnt buy trolley cars from outside car works, like most lines did.  They built their own right on site, in that building behind the red brick one. 

 

This was one of the very few (that I know of) streetcar lines that built their own equipment.  Presumably this was just assembly and they didnt actually cast wheels and build motors and such on-site. There's actually some photos of the interior of the operation showing their shops at work.  I think I posted a thread on this a while back.

 

Anway, this is actually rather a key project for Brown Street and it could really make or break the Oakwood/Dayton connection along Brown.  I'd prefer they'd find a way to keep the head shed along Brown, but infill has to be sensitive or the street will be screwed up.  Frank Z was sort of an ugly gap between UD area and the neat little business district in the vicinty of the Pine Club. 

 

 

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Where could I find those photos of the interior of the operation?  Thanks for the info.

 

I'd be happy if they kept the facade at the very least.  Hopefully they keep in mind some sort of "urban" aesthetic.  MVG's record at UD isn't awful but it's not exactly inspiring.

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2 historic buildings in West Toledo likely to be history

 

 

Are these still standing?

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^Good news. The much bigger worry now is Libbey High School. TPS wants it down ASAP to get state funds.

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Suit filed to reclaim downtown Toledo landmarks

Local company seeks foreclosure against California equity firm

The Toledo company that holds the note on the landmark Spitzer Building and the neighboring Nicholas Building downtown has filed a foreclosure action to reclaim them from the California-based private equity firm that owns the buildings.

 

The Spitzer Building Co. filed the foreclosure action Monday against Ergur Private Equity Group LLC and its principal officer, Koray Ergur, of San Francisco, seeking payment of more than $800,000 in outstanding loans, interest, and incurred maintenance costs for the Spitzer Building, 520 Madison Ave.

 

The suit alleges that the note has been in default since Feb. 13, 2010.

 

The company also filed suit against Ergur Group and Mr. Ergur seeking more than $300,000 in outstanding loans, interest, and incurred maintenance costs for the neighboring Nicholas Building, at 608 Madison.

 

 

Full story at: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20110125/BUSINESS05/110129715

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North Main street closed due to partial building collapse

 

MOUNT VERNON — After a section of the former Grohe building at 108 N. Main Street, fell to the sidewalk on Monday, building owner Mark Ramser is putting the wheels in motion to demolish the building.

 

“My plans were to demolish that building anyway. Now that time table has been moved up a little bit,” Ramser told the News this morning.

 

Demolition.jpg

 

http://www.mountvernonnews.com/local/11/04/05/corner-of-grohe-building-crumbles

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The old Ecki Building at the corner of Wayne and Wyoming in Dayton was recently demolished.

 

Demolition of Old Building Opens the Way to Development

 

"...Keith Klein, senior development specialist for Dayton, said 35,000 vehicles traveling daily through the intersection — near the University of Dayton — make it an ideal location for a restaurant, fast-food establishment, offices or other business.

 

With the land cleared, “people can visualize the potential of the site ,” Klein said.

 

Since 1929, a distinctive Spanish Colonial Revival-style building had stood on that corner."

 

I can "visualize" yet another craptastic suburbanesque big parking lot/little building thingy on the site.

 

 

 

 

 

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I can "visualize" yet another craptastic suburbanesque big parking lot/little building thingy on the site.

 

So can Mr. Klein, I'm sure.  He probably thinks that's a good thing.

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I think he's just spinning it.

 

But it's funny how this particular demolition violated Daytons own internal priorization system, which assigned the highest priority to damaged/abandonded buildings next door to or on blocks of inhabited buildings. 

 

Apparently there was an internal decision to jump this project to the top of their demo list, even if it didnt score high as a urgent demo candidate.

 

 

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Really bad news here. This is one of the best buildings in Uptown is on a very visible intersection, not the mention the building is gorgeous. The Ohio School Facilities Commission is unbelievable. Why do they have to rush every demolition?

 

Published: 4/27/2011

Old post office could be razed by end of year

Jefferson Center fate may hinge on historic building's occupancy

BY NOLAN ROSENKRANS

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The fate of Toledo's historic former post office building is in limbo. The Jefferson Center at 13th Street and Madison Avenue, which was once Toledo's central post office and is now owned by Toledo Public Schools, is scheduled to be demolished by the end of the year. But its fate largely depends on who, if anyone, will occupy the building in the future. The school district could pull the building off the wrecking-ball list. No final decision has been made on what will become of the building.

 

"We understand there will be some concerns with the building," TPS business manager James Gant said. "We understand what role it plays in the community."

 

The building, placed in 1972 on the National Register of Historic Places as the Old Central Post Office, was designed by classical design advocate and architect James Knox Taylor, the supervising architect of the Department of the Treasury who left his mark on hundreds of federal buildings across the United States. The Old Central Post Office opened in 1911. The school district bought the building from the federal government in 1966 for $1 -- on the condition that the facility be used for educational purposes -- and operated it until 1970 as the Jefferson Center for Vocational Rehabilitation.

 

The school was converted in 1970 into the district's alternative school. It was closed after voters rejected a 6.9-mill levy in 2000 that forced the district to cut about $15 million from its budget. The center, like Libbey High School in South Toledo, is scheduled to be demolished by the end of the year. If demolition is not begun by then, the district may lose funding from the Ohio School Facilities Commission for the work. TPS would then be responsible for any possible demolition, along with maintaining the building while it is still open.

 

CONTINUED ON BLADE SITE WITH PHOTOS

http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2011/04/27/Old-post-off-ice-could-be-razed-by-end-of-year.html

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Preservation of Jefferson Center gains ground

 

As long as the full Toledo Board of Education approves, the historic Jefferson Center — the former Central Post Office — will not come tumbling down.

 

At a news conference Tuesday, three school board members — President Bob Vasquez, Vice President Lisa Sobecki, and Brenda Hill — said they will present the full board with a resolution to remove the downtown building from the demolition list.

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2011/05/04/Untitled-BQNMRGKV-01N.html

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Looks like Ironton may lose its Memorial Hall:

 

2010_0306Portsmouth0273.jpg

 

City takes steps toward demolishing Veterans Memorial Hall

 

The City of Ironton is taking steps toward the demolition of Veterans Memorial Hall, a decision that came after members of a local veterans group decided to give up efforts to restore the 100-plus year-old building.

 

A structural evaluation of the building has been scheduled for Friday, Mayor Rich Blankenship said.

 

“Council’s wish at this time it appears is to obtain a demolition price cost,” Blankenship said Wednesday. “But the first thing we want to do is the evaluation.”

 

http://www.irontontribune.com/2011/04/25/coming-down-soon/

 

 

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^I have wondered if you could save the tower and front facade; you would not necessarily need the four outer walls.

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A few impending demolitions in Lakewood (a densely populated and built suburb of Cleveland)

 

http://gyroscopethattakesyouplaces.wordpress.com/2011/05/10/history-with-a-target-on-it/

 

One of the planned demos includes the Detroit Theater for a McDonalds ?!  :cry:

 

(found some discussion of the Mcdonalds on lakewood observer: http://www.lakewoodobserver.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=10083

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A couple buildings in Bellevue may disappear:

 

2007_0713Bellevue0182.jpg

 

Library moves toward demolition of vacant properties

 

In Jan­u­ary the Ohio EPA approved a Phase I grant request that will pay for the required ini­tial envi­ron­men­tal eval­u­a­tion of the vacant build­ings on Main Street/Route 20 (at San­dusky Street) owned by the Belle­vue Pub­lic Library. The grant appli­ca­tion was facil­i­tated by the Belle­vue Devel­op­ment Cor­po­ra­tion (BDC) with autho­riza­tion by the City of Belle­vue on behalf of the Library. The grant appli­ca­tion would not have been pos­si­ble for the Library with­out the col­lab­o­ra­tive efforts of the BDC, the for­ward vision of the Mayor, and the con­tin­ued sup­port of the City. Approval of the Phase I appli­ca­tion means that the project to raze these vacant build­ings can move for­ward at no cost to the Library or local community.

 

http://thebellevuegazette.com/local-news/library-moves-toward-demolition-of-vacant-properties-2/

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A fire in Downtown Cadiz has put this great building in jeopardy; fortunately the owner is working to save it.

 

37103175.jpg

 

Owner to shrink-wrap fire-damaged historic building.

 

CADIZ — Weeks after an historic Harrison County building was heavily damaged by fire, the owner is going to use an unconventional way to try to salvage it.

 

The building in downtown Cadiz caught fire in May. Fire officials called it a complete loss and said it would have to be torn down.

 

But the building’s owner, Tom Cole, said he’s going to try to save the W. Market Street building by shrink-wrapping it to prevent further damage.

 

http://www.timesreporter.com/communities/x1293695195/Owner-to-shrink-wrap-fire-damaged-historic-building

 

Photos of fire here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/58836420@N03/5694587152/#in/photostream/

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The Parker Hotel buildings in Hillsboro have been in flux for several years.

 

Hillsboro11.jpg

 

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Parker Hotel owner sues city for $2.6 million

City of Hillsboro threatening to tear down Hope's building

 

Alleging that the city is "guilty of undue aggravation" and damage to his reputation, Jack Hope has filed a motion suing the city of Hillsboro for more than $2 million.

 

Hope is the owner of the buildings at 131, 133, 135, 137 and 139 W. Main St. in Hillsboro, known by many as the former Parker Hotel and Carousel Lounge. The condition of the buildings has been a point of contention between Hope and the city of Hillsboro, resulting in litigation that ultimately forced the city to rewrite its ordinance on safety inspections.

 

http://www.timesgazette.com/main.asp?TypeID=1&ArticleID=179073&SectionID=18&SubSectionID=175&Page=3

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The school demolition program has picked up steam again. Gorgeous, structurally sound Jones Junior High is currently being demolished in order to become an urban prairie. It was closed a few years ago (the new school building a block away is also slated to close). The Old South End is pretty depressing. Few neighborhoods have been hit harder by the economy than this part of Toledo (not to downplay what's happening in the rest of the city). Not only has a lot been lost to arson, but these big, imposing school buildings are now being leveled. Libbey High School is next unless a miracle can stop it. Demographically, this part of Toledo is in freefall. The last census showed black, white, and Latino flight. For a long time, this was Ohio's largest Mexican barrio, but that might not be true anymore (though there are still some nice shops and restaurants that have beaten the odds). Overall, it's sinking fast, and it's a shame since it has a lot of potential. There are some interesting rowhouses, double-deckers, and Queen Annes scattered around the neighborhood. There are also some gorgeous Catholic churches in very close proximity to each other (makes a cool steeple skyline). A couple blocks of really nice commercial buildings are also still standing...largely abandoned. Time is ticking fast in this neighborhood. More great buildings will come down if they are not occupied soon.

 

Jones had a prominent location in the neighborhood at Broadway and Walbridge. It had this giant staircase at the main entrance. It was shoehorned into an irregular site on an angled street, so very cool:

 

img0032na.jpg

 

09jonesstairs.jpg

 

26jonestower.jpg

 

jonesg.jpg

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Lack of bids on Libbey could seal school's fate

BY NOLAN ROSENKRANS

BLADE STAFF WRITE

Published: 8/11/2011

 

In the end, there was no savior for Libbey High School. There was no wealthy benefactor, no university looking to expand, no developer to renovate the building.

 

"Is there a bid for the minimum price of $395,000?" Toledo Public Schools' lawyer Keith Wilkowski called out in front of the shuttered school.

 

No reply.

 

Nobody bid on Libbey Wednesday during a public auction, likely the last chance to save the school from demolition. Asbestos abatement begins Thursday and demolition is to start in December.

 

Libbey supporters showed up for support, hanging signs and unfurling banners. Some curious onlookers stoked their curiosity and left. TV crews trained their cameras, but nobody put down the minimum $395,000 for the more than 300,000-square-foot structure on Western Avenue in South Toledo. Jim Gant, TPS business manager, was not shocked.

 

"I'm not, unfortunately," Mr. Gant said. "I hoped for the best, but I'm not surprised."

 

The district closed Libbey in 2010 after years of declining enrollment. It costs about $160,000 a year for utilities and maintenance even while empty, according to district estimates, at a time when TPS is cutting teachers and salaries. If TPS does not begin demolition by the end of the year, the district may lose about $1.5 million in funding from the Ohio School Facilities Commission for the work.

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/Education/2011/08/11/Lack-of-bids-on-Libbey-could-seal-school-s-fate.html

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Findlay might demolish this handsome commercial block:

 

Findlay2.jpg

 

City facing decision on demolition

By LOU WILIN

 

Stuck with an absentee property owner apathetic about its collapsing downtown building, Findlay City Council faces a decision: whether to spend $100,000 to demolish 223, 225 and 227 S. Main St.

 

City administrators for years have tried to get the owner, Taurus Capital Management of Louisville, Ky., to fix or demolish the building, City Law Director David Hackenberg told City Council on Tuesday. But the company's lawyers keep stringing along city administrators.

 

City officials have tried to win the support of a bank that holds a mortgage on the building. However, with the mortgage payments being made, the bank appears to be indifferent, Hackenberg said.

 

http://www.wtol.com/story/15286473/findlay-debates-downtown-building-demolition

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Springfield may lose one of its tallest buildings:

 

spi2.jpg

 

Arcue building to be razed

By Tiffany Y. Latta, Staff Writer

 

SPRINGFIELD — The 94-year-old Arcue Building that was once said to be the landmark of the city’s central business district will soon fall to a wrecking ball.

 

The 37,000 square foot building at 6 W. High St. is under contract to be sold by Nov. 1 to Midland Properties, a local real estate firm that plans to demolish the building to make way for undetermined future development.

 

About 15 tenants who occupy businesses in the building were told a month ago they must vacate the building by Oct. 15. The building is scheduled to close Nov. 1 and will be razed in January.

 

Midland Properties President Tom Loftis said the building is structurally sound, but the cost to update the structure, which still has a manual elevator and lacks central heating and cooling systems, is not feasible, he said.

 

http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/news/springfield-news/arcue-building-to-be-razed-1254718.html

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